cat5e crossover transfer rate of ~400 KB/s?!

November 14, 2010 at 12:59:07
Specs: Windows 7, a lot of both
I'm trying to move ~10gb worth of data from my desktop to my laptop. Both comps have Realtek PCIe GBE cards, which I assume are gigabit cards. I've connected my computers via Cat5e crossover cable, and I'm getting utter sh*t transfer rates. I'm talking 400 KB/s steady, and just over half a meg peak.

Both machines are Windows 7. Both Machines are on the same homegroup/workgroup. Both machines have 7200 RPM hdd (though we're not even close to transfer speeds where hdd RPM should be an issue). I've turned off anti-virus software on both machines (just in case). I shut off wireless on my laptop to ensure the ethernet connection is used. I've hard-set both machine's ethernet cards to full-duplex 1.0gb. I've set up the connection with using this guide here:

http://en.kioskea.net/forum/affich-...

Something is wrong with the connection. What gives?


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#1
November 14, 2010 at 13:01:00
reterminate your crossover cable.

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#2
November 14, 2010 at 13:05:14
thanks for the reply, but why should I have to reterminate my crossover cable? I just bought it from radio shack about 30 mins ago. Just to clarify, it's a legit crossover cable, i.e. not a regular ethernet cable.

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#3
November 14, 2010 at 13:10:55
oh ok I figured you had terminated it yourself.

Disable the windows firewall service on both machines.

right click my computer > manage > services and applications > services > windows firewall service > right-click > properties > startup type "manual" > click stop button > apply > ok > restart


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Related Solutions

#4
November 14, 2010 at 13:41:24
wow, ok. we're up to 11 MB/s. That's no gigabit, but it's better. so:

1) Why am i still getting diminished transfer rates?

2) If this is the highest rate i can get, is there a way to keep the W7 firewall from killing my LAN transfer rates without disabling it?


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#5
November 14, 2010 at 13:46:18
that's a good question. I would have to play around with it to give you a good answer. To be honest, the windows firewall is something of a mystery to me, even though I've been working with it for years. Disabling it is just a quick way to get it out of the way temporarily.

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#6
November 14, 2010 at 13:57:18
How strange. I wonder if I should have restarted after I hard-set both ethernet adapters to Full Duplex 1.0 gigabit? Well, either way, this is a usable transfer rate and it'll do for now. Wish I could see something higher though..

...ok scratch that. This must be from a different problem. I think this is going to be very interesting.

What I'm trying to do is move a folder with hundreds-of-thousands of very small .wav files from my desktop to my laptop. 2.56 gigs in all. When I just tested my transfer rate with the new setup (sans firewall), I did so by transferring a single large file instead of my original attempted file transfer. I did this because it would save the time that windows takes to "discover" all of those small individual files (about 10 minutes). Well the single large file transfer rate is what was recorded at 11 MB/s steady. I just attempted my original file transfer again thinking my slow transfer rate problem was fixed, and, with the exact same setup, my transfer rate is back down to 300 KB/s territory. This must be an issue with transferring a large number of small files in a single folder. Data is data. I wonder why there is a difference.

Any thoughts on this?


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#7
November 14, 2010 at 14:34:09
yeah multiple small files will always slow down the transfer. There's more overhead.

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#8
November 14, 2010 at 14:49:11
I compressed the folder containing the files and now i'm back up to 11 MB/s. I think i just learned a valuable lesson about data compression :) Thanks for your help, jowah.

Still would like to know why i'm not seeing higher transfer rates, though. If anyone has any insight into that, I would appreciate it.


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#9
November 14, 2010 at 14:50:19
Anytime Jazz. Hey maybe you should try setting the NICs back to auto-negotiate now.

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#10
November 14, 2010 at 14:52:52
one step ahead of ya, haha. no dice.

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#11
November 14, 2010 at 15:05:53
dang.

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#12
November 14, 2010 at 15:15:14
it would be interesting to run a ping to the windows box from the linux box since linux ping shows more accurate ping times. If the times are all erratic then that might give a clue as to another type of comm problem. You could TTY into the linux terminal with putty and then just do

ping 192.168.100.2 or (whatever your windows box ip is)

it's remotely possible that another network connection is conflicting with the crossover network if they are both using the same class c subnet. Now that I think about it, another way to test that would be to disconnect all other network connections on both machines except for the crossover cable.


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#13
November 15, 2010 at 09:23:27
The pinout for a 1000 Mbps crossover is different from that of a 100 Mbps crossover.

For a 100 Mbps, you only have to change the orange and green wire pairs. For 1000 Mbps, you have to change them all. Have a look at your crossover cable ends. If the Blue and Brown pairs have not been crossed, your cable will max out at 100 Mbps and will not achieve 1000 Mbps.

If it is a true 1000 Mbps crossover, then I would say it seems most likely to be a NIC issue you're having.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#14
November 15, 2010 at 13:44:49
nice. I did not know that.

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#15
November 15, 2010 at 14:02:23
One thing to consider with regard to the crossover. If yours is wired for 100 Mbps only, you should still be able to achieve a 100 Mbps connection from PC to PC.

Since you weren't connecting even at 100 Mbps, I suspect the real issue is one, or both, of the NIC's.

If it is a NIC issue, it will be a little tougher to troubleshoot unless you have another PC or a laptop with a known good 1000 Mbps NIC in it. If you do, you connect (with a 1000 Mbps crossover) to PC 1 and then to PC 2. If 1 connects at 1000 and 2 doesn't, the NIC in 2 is the problem.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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