Can't Get Online When Bypassing Router

October 27, 2011 at 15:07:04
Specs: Windows 7
I'm trying to remove my router from my home network and connect my computer directly into the line coming into the house. I'm doing this to, among other things, run some tests to evaluate the impact of my router on my bandwidth.

However, removing the line seems to be causing problems. Everything is fine when I'm behind the router, but once I unplug the line from the router and plug it directly into my computer, I can't connect to the internet. I get a "limited or no access" error on my Local Area Network. Once I reconnect the router, though, everything's fine.

I've tried several things. I've tried turning off the Windows Firewall to no avail (I have no other firewalls on my computer). I've checked to make sure that "Obtain an IP address automatically" and "Obtain DNS server address automatically" are checked, which they are. I ran ipconfig /release and ipconfig /renew only to receive the following error:

"An error occurred while renewing interface Local Area Connection : unable to contact your DHCP server. Request has timed out."

I'm running Windows 7 behind a Linksys WRT54G router. My line is (I think) fiber-optic, since there's no modem anywhere in the house, just a small beige termination box. I've posted dumps of ipconfig /all with and without the router. What do I need to do to get online without the router? Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks.

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ipconfig /all when behind router

Windows IP Configuration

Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Smith-PC
Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Dell Wireless 1395 WLAN Mini-Card
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-22-5F-3B-A5-3D
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Marvell Yukon 88E8040 PCI-E Fast Ethernet Controller
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-21-9B-EE-EB-C2
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::6188:b51c:7db5:5f9f%10(Preferred)
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100(Preferred)
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Thursday, October 27, 2011 5:06:39 PM
Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Friday, October 28, 2011 5:08:19 PM
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 234889627
DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-13-AE-CA-4D-00-21-9B-F0-AC-D8
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 205.152.37.23
205.152.144.23
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Tunnel adapter isatap.{61CF12D3-650E-42DE-B94B-A4C846AB53C2}:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:0:4137:9e76:4c2:1389:beac:3c1f(Preferred)
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::4c2:1389:beac:3c1f%13(Preferred)
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : ::
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled

Tunnel adapter isatap.{A49D4761-54FB-48DA-9E00-8E41ADDBB82B}:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter #2
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

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ipconfig /all when router removed from network


Windows IP Configuration

Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Smith-PC
Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Dell Wireless 1395 WLAN Mini-Card
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-22-5F-3B-A5-3D
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Marvell Yukon 88E8040 PCI-E Fast Ethernet Controller
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-21-9B-EE-EB-C2
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::6188:b51c:7db5:5f9f%10(Preferred)
Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address. . : 169.254.95.159(Preferred)
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 234889627
DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-13-AE-CA-4D-00-21-9B-F0-AC-D8
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Tunnel adapter isatap.{61CF12D3-650E-42DE-B94B-A4C846AB53C2}:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter isatap.{A49D4761-54FB-48DA-9E00-8E41ADDBB82B}:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter #2
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------


See More: Cant Get Online When Bypassing Router

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#1
October 27, 2011 at 15:11:57
it might be because of your ISP. I have Comcast and can do it, but I don't know about yours.

Did you get any software from your ISP? that might be why too.

Edit: If that beige box is not a modem, that could be why too. What type of router are you using?


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#2
October 27, 2011 at 15:15:58
As I mentioned, I'm using a Linksys WRT54G router. I've never installed software on my computer from either my router or my ISP. And my understanding is that you don't need a modem for a fiber-optic line, only for cable.

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#3
October 27, 2011 at 15:22:05
First off, a fibre optic connection requires a fibre optic network interface. Do you have one of those? If not, then you're not going to connect.

Second, upon looking at your ipconfig output with router removed I see the following:
Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address. . : 169.254.95.159(Preferred)

The 169... is callled an APIPA address and that tells me you're not connecting to the DHCP server. The APIPA address is assigned when you don't receive one from DHCP.

If you have a fibre optic NIC in your computer and you're not getting a proper IP address from your ISP's DHCP server you need to call your providers support line. Chances are it's a simple case of they register MAC addresses and your routers MAC is registered to that connection (and it works) and your computer's MAC isn't. If that's the case, they can fix that up for you. If that's not the case, they are the best people to contact to resolve this issue.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
October 27, 2011 at 15:25:57
That is why I asked what ISP you are using. Some do record.

Also, curt, since he was using a linksys WRT54g, the fiber is being converted to RJ45 by whatever that box he mentioned is

You will need to contact your ISP as Curt mentioned. It is probably the best way to solve this.


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#5
October 27, 2011 at 15:34:06
My ISP is BellSouth. Here's a photo of the box in question:

http://tinypic.com/r/nz16ab/5

The white line is the line coming in from outside. The black line is the line going up to my router. Am I correct in calling this a termination box?


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#6
October 27, 2011 at 17:41:58
It's a converter. It is taking whatever line you have coming in and converting it into RJ45 ethernet

The line coming in through looks like it is small and flat. The picture isn't clear, but is that what it is?

This is a fiber line:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_uyUCaW-qs...

I would bet that the reason you can't use your computer without the router is either because of the ISP or that box.


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#7
October 28, 2011 at 07:31:08
The line coming into the box doesn't have a plug. The bare wires connect with some small electronic components to form an Ethernet port, from which the black line going out connects with the router. So a converter sounds like an appropriate description. We got our line 10 years ago, so the converter may be using technology that's a little outdated. Still, it's a relatively simple-looking piece of technology, and my intuition tells me that it's having much of an impact on my ability to connect directly.

From what I'm hearing, it's difficult to connect to a direct internet line without some piece of technology (a router or modem) sitting between me and the internet. It seems to me that there was a time when we didn't have a router, so I'm guessing that we had some settings on our computer that went away when we got the router. (Reaching back that far into my memory, that sounds familiar.) I think that doing a direct connection will require either a) moving some settings from my router back onto my computer, or b) contacting my ISP. It's really too bad, though, that a router can't just be a piece of simple plug-and-play technology with any type of network connection.


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#8
October 28, 2011 at 09:10:12
It's impossible to tell from your picture if that is a fibre optic cable or copper. It looks like copper to me. If you unplugged the black cable and took a picture of the end that plugs into the box, then I would be able to tell you what it is (ie: copper or fibre)

If it is fibre optic then the box is a "media converter" as it converts from copper to fibre and vice versa. There is another name for them as well but at the moment I can't think of it.

From what I'm hearing, it's difficult to connect to a direct internet line without some piece of technology (a router or modem) sitting between me and the internet.

Correct. Some kind of device is required to convert the signal from what it is travelling over the phone line (2 wire or one pair) to the network cable (8 wire or four pair). This is done with a modem. Modem = Modulate/Demodulate.

The same is true for a coax (cable) setup.

In a typical ADSL setup you have a phone line that goes into the modem and a network cable coming out of that which can either go into a router or a computer. A lot of ISP's now issue clients a "combination" device that is a modem/router/wireless access point all in one. If you have a combo unit and remove it then you won't get any internet...........period.

Again, at this point in time, your best bet is to call your ISP and ask them about the your connection and the equipment.

It's really too bad, though, that a router can't just be a piece of simple plug-and-play technology with any type of network connection.

Actually, they usually are. I've worked with quite a few different makes and models of SOHO Routers utilizing both cable (coax) and ADSL (phone line) and they all were pretty much plug-and-pray and worked as soon as they were plugged in. There are minor differences in account types between different providers, but for the most part, it's PnP. You however have likely changed something on your computer, or more likely in my opinion, removed a necessary component (ie: the modem) and that's why your connection isn't working.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#9
October 28, 2011 at 18:58:21
I can tell you without a picture that the black cable is just a standard RJ-45 Ethernet cable. It goes directly from the converter box straight into the router. There are no wireless or router capabilities on the box in question, so I'm guessing that it's just a simple network hardware converter.

When I said plug-and-play, I meant that it's too bad that I can't just remove the router from the network and connect directly with no fuss. It's too bad that my computer settings have to be different depending on whether or not I have a router. I would think the computer would be smart enough to detect whether or not it's talking to the internet via router and change its own settings accordingly.

Your explanation of a modem makes sense, and I may call the ISP in the near future anyway.


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