Can I have a G and N router with one modem?

Linksys Wrt54g wireless router
January 10, 2011 at 06:42:52
Specs: Windows XP
Can I connect a G router and an N router to one modem and have 2 separate wireless networks? I'd like to use an N router for some apllications (4G iPod, video streaming), but still use the G for older computers, iPods and laptops. Is it possible?

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#1
January 10, 2011 at 07:35:11
Most wireless N routers will be backwards compatible to G also so you shouldn't need two separate devices.. Just ensure whatever you purchase can do both.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
January 10, 2011 at 08:28:14
I wondering, though, if the G devices will slow down the N router? I guess my "dream setup" would be to be able to have two separate networks where I could choose either the G or N router depending on the device, and set the G for G-only and the N for N-only. I have currently the WRT54G and the E2000 routers, along with the cable company provided router.

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#3
January 10, 2011 at 09:58:36
I wondering, though, if the G devices will slow down the N router?

People always wonder that and that simple answer is no, G will not slow the N down.

I've been working with computers for a long time now and if there's one thing I've learned, it's to always follow the KISS principle. Setting up dual routers when you don't have to is adding a layer of complexity you do not need. It means more time and effort to configure everything and if something breaks (as so often happens) it means that much more stuff to have to look through to troubleshoot the issue.

If you feel you absolutely have to make your home setup more complex than it needs to be, feel free. But simply put, it's unnecessary if your N router is backwards compatible to G.

I guess my "dream setup" would be to be able to have two separate networks where I could choose either the G or N router depending on the device, and set the G for G-only and the N for N-only.

Look, this is very simple. If you have an N adapter on your laptop and an N WLAN is available, you connect on N. If however, your adapter is G capable (most are) and there is no N but there is a G WLAN, then it will connect at G.

G cannot connect to N but if your WLAN device is N and G capable (most are) then it can connect to said device at G.

So your "dream setup" is actually how things work without having to "set" anything to G only.

Remember, by design, all network adapters always connect at the fastest possible speed, not the slowest

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#4
January 10, 2011 at 11:23:42
Thank you for the concise answer.

The reason why I asked in the first place is because the N-router is selectable dual band, and I was concerned with not being able to take advantage of the 5 mHz band. I was thinking that having a two router setup would allow the use of this band without having to keep switching back and forth on the N router.


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#5
January 10, 2011 at 12:39:27
Setting the router to 5 MHz over 2.4 MHz won't give your clients any more bandwidth.

Read the specs on your N router. Does it operate at both N and G while set to 5 MHz? If yes, then no worries, set it up at 5 and run it. If not, if it can only do G and N while set to 2.4 MHz, it won't make any difference to the actual service provided to clients. N clients should still connect at around 100 Mbps and G at around 54 Mbps.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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