can a workgroup switch make a network crash

January 30, 2011 at 05:23:58
Specs: Windows 7
I work in a school department and wanted to hardwire two computers in my class using a workgroup switch. I only had one data port in my class. The tech guy told me the switch could cause the entire network to crash. Is that true? I thought a switch was just a passthrough device.

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#1
January 30, 2011 at 07:16:40
You can't add hardware to the existing network, especially if you are trying to split the signal from a wall jack.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
January 30, 2011 at 07:22:57
The switch has no software and when I hooked it up I had internet on both computers for a month until the tech guy found out. Is he making a bigger deal than it really is?

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#3
January 30, 2011 at 07:31:05
Whether you can add another computer the wall jack is dependent on what the wall jack is connected to and how it is configured. If there is a router at the other end using DHCP then there is no reason why a switch cannot be added.

If there is a file server with network addresses configured manually then adding a switch will cause problems. Probably not cause the network to crash but could cause problems on that particular node as two computers try and use the same IP address.

It could be done but would require the co-operation of the System Admin and it looks like the System Admin doesn't want to provide his co-operation.

Stuart


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#4
January 30, 2011 at 07:31:28
I also spoke to someone from Cisco and they assured me that it was not true. however they are trying to sell products. The response I got from them was that there is no user interface and no firewall, so there is no conceivable way for the device to make any configuration changes to the network. Who is right?

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#5
January 30, 2011 at 11:28:20
If you already had it working for a month, why are you asking the question? You didn't say that in your original post. What did the admin do after that month to stop it?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#6
January 31, 2011 at 07:49:58
The tech guy told me the switch could cause the entire network to crash. Is that true?

Yes, it's very true. You could easily cause a loop that shuts down part, or all of, the network.


The switch has no software and when I hooked it up I had internet on both computers for a month until the tech guy found out. Is he making a bigger deal than it really is?

No, he's not. If you knew anything at all about that network, or networking in general you'd know this.

First off, if you're not the IT guy, you have NO business plugging anything in anywhere without prior approval from the IT person/department.

It's a simple enough process to discuss your needs with the IT people before attempting to take matters into your own hands. Where I work, you would have been fired for what you did and escorted off the property immediately because you're not a member of the IT department.

What I find particularly offensive about this, and you, is, you don't know squat about the network and networking yet you seem to think you're smarter than the person(s) that manage and administer the aforementioned network. You thought it was ok to just do as you please. If you didn't get canned, you should thank the good Lord above for the reprieve because I can promise you, had you done something similar here, you would indeed have been fired immediately.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#7
April 6, 2011 at 20:41:25
Hey Curt I was just wondering if you could go into detail about how it could create a loop and shutdown part or all of the network?

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