Building a two-PC WinXP LAN

November 23, 2011 at 11:14:47
Specs: Windows xp, E5200, 4GB DDR-II RAM
I want to build a local network in an office.
The network will be between two Windows XP Pro machines that are sharing internet access via a LAN modem (an optical cable enters the modem and then two regular LAN cables exit the modem and enter the two PCs).

The goal is the two machines to be able to exchange files.

What should I do?
Just turn on file sharing for the folders that need to be shared?
Or do I need to have a separate LAN cable between the two PCs?

Needless to say that the two machines must be the only two on that network.
They should be the only two that access to the shared files, with no outside access to the network.
In other words: it must be some sort of a private network of only these two computers.

Any tips on how to do that?
Thanks!


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#1
November 23, 2011 at 12:11:28
Is the LAN modem also a router?

If not, then you'll want to get one and put it between the modem and the clients. With both client computer's network interfaces set to get their TCP/IP settings from the DHCP server on the router, they will both be in the LAN and able to share. The only thing left to do is to share a folder (or folders as the case may be) and connect to it.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
November 23, 2011 at 12:36:42
Quite honestly, I don't know if the modem is a router as well...
It was installed by the ISP and I don't know much about it other than it is supplying the two PCs with internet.

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#3
November 24, 2011 at 07:25:58
If you could supply us with the make/model of the router, we could find out. Mind you, you could search that information on google as easily as I could..........

I suspect if it is supplying the two PC's with internet, it's likely a "combination device" (combo) that is a mode, router and wireless access point all combined into one device.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
December 2, 2011 at 17:47:01
Hi again, I noticed one thing: when I do an IPCONFIG on each of the computers, the IP that shows is the IP on the internet, not the local IP (i.e. 192.168.1.1 or something).
This must mean something???

Maybe there is no real LAN connection going on between the two computers, only an internet connection?
I'm really confused.


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#5
December 3, 2011 at 08:11:37
Please respond with the Make and Model of your router.

On both computers open a command prompt window and enter the following command:

ipconfig /all

Put the output of both in your response along with the other information requested.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
December 3, 2011 at 11:35:27
I created the same Workgroup for both machines but they only see themselves in that group. They don't see the other computer in the group.

I have no idea what make or model the router is - all I know is that it was installed by the ISP. I will try to get the info the next time I go to that place.

Regarding the IPCONFIG - it shows the internet IPs, not the internal LAN IPs of the machines.


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#7
December 3, 2011 at 12:39:01
If they are Internet IPs then they cannot both be the same. If they are different then they are probably local addresses. They do not have to be 192.168.xx.xx That is a Class C address. They could be a Class A address which starts with 10.xx.xx.xx. Some manufactures use Class A addresses by default. Most use Class C.

Knowing what these IP addresses are would help a lot. But ipconfig /all will tell us that.

Stuart


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#8
December 3, 2011 at 21:07:10
Hi, the IPs on the two machines were different. They were the actual IPs of the computers on the internet. There was the name of the ISP next to each of the IPs.

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#9
December 4, 2011 at 03:18:33
So basically, the modem provided by your ISP supplies a different public IP address for each PC. The simplest solution would be to get a router. Drop one of the modem connections. Connect the other modem connection to the router WAN port and then each PC to a router LAN port. You will need to configure the router of course.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#10
December 4, 2011 at 13:29:14
^ Yes, this is the case, thanks for your help.

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