Solved Bring internet access to metal pole barn 200 feet from house

June 5, 2015 at 09:13:52
Specs: Windows 7
I have a metal pole barn 200 feet from my house where I would like to have internet access. When I built the barn 7 years ago I ran power to it through underground conduit. Anticipating this I put another run of conduit in the trench with a POTS line and Cat5E cable. I used the POTS to provide phone service to the barn up until we dropped our landline but the network cable has sat unused, terminating in the barn and my basement. If I move my router to a spot the network cable will reach in the house, can I hook that line to the router in the house and add a second wireless router in the barn using your "add a second router to your LAN" instructions? Will there be conflict between the 2 wireless signals if a weak signal from one of the routers reaches the area served by the other router? Sometimes I had a buzz in my phone line out in the barn. I think it might have been a grounding problem. The barn has its own ground rod. It doesnt have a separate ground line running back to the service entrance. Would that cause interference?

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#1
June 5, 2015 at 13:26:34
✔ Best Answer
You will be adding a wireless access point to your network. This can be done with another wireless router or a range extender set up as a wireless access point and you will set it up with the same wireless account name and access ('password') with the fixed IP address of the new router or range extender in the same range as the original router but a slightly different number (192.168.100.01 and 192.168.100.11 or similar). The router or range extender will probably not include the full instructions for this in the box but you will have to download it from the mfg's website in the form of the full manual (that's what I had to do). I am using a D-Link DAP-1650 for this purpose but actually in the same house and it works well. If set up properly you should be able to walk between buildings and your portable device should hand off from the access point to the router seamlessly. I hope that this helps you.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
June 5, 2015 at 13:34:20
I do not know exactly the code/laws about the grounding the out building so you probably would want to take that up with a licensed electrician. Is the conduit metal or plastic? If metal because a metal conduit may be usable to support a ground connection or you may be able to feed through a ground connection if not, but an electrician would be able to tell you what is proper. They might be able to give you a bit of advice in the way of a consultation/quote to resolve an issue and that should not be expensive and may be free.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
June 5, 2015 at 22:04:51
Regarding the ground situation: I did the work with the help of a friend who is an electrician. It is up to code but I have heard since that a ground running back to the service entrance is becoming recommended more and more because the separate ground can cause noise in electronic circuits and trip GFCIs. I just heard that somewhere but am not sure if it is really so.

The conduit is plastic so of no use in providing a ground. I might try pulling a ground wire through the conduit if I can confirm it would be needed and would meet code, but it sounds like a lot of trouble for a maybe.

I mentioned it because I was concerned that if it really was the cause of noise in the landline it would cause a problem with the Cat5E cable too. I've had no other electrical issues other than sporadic buzz in the landline. I was hoping someone here might know before I call an electrician. I guess I'll just give the second router a try.

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#4
June 5, 2015 at 23:43:42
If the telephone cable is unshielded (or shielded but not grounded) and in close proximity of the power cable, induction can occur, even on a short distance. Did that buzz happen when a high power was drawn in the barn? Electrical motor/machinery etc.. ?

A POTS line house-entrance usually has an overvoltage protection that needs to be grounded. If the overvoltage protection has already fired in past lightning storms it maybe partly damaged and one wire may have a low resistance to ground. This can also affect quality on the telephone line.


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#5
June 8, 2015 at 05:25:14
Thanks sluc. That makes sense. The conduit with the POTS and CAT5E is inches away from the conduit with the power line. I guess I was hoping a few inches of dirt would provide shielding. While we had the land line we lost phone service on at least two occasions during lightning storms. In both instances the repairs were made at a phone company access box at the main road about a quarter mile from the house. Imagine that, a metal box poking up out of the ground on the edge of 80 acres of soybeans would be prone to lightning strikes!

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#6
June 8, 2015 at 05:53:22
Another suggestion, aside from a surge protector on the power line, seriously consider a surge protector that has Cat5 protection as well for both ends of that run between buildings in case a lightning strike somewhere nearby causes a surge through a wire somewhere that might then damage some of your equipment.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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