Solved Best PoE Switches You've Used, or Worst

Any / ANY
July 31, 2010 at 21:11:20
Specs: Any Win, XEON/1GB
I haven't worked with too many PoE switches yet, but I'm starting to work on projects involving IP security cameras that are PoE capable.
I'm looking for feedback from anyone who's had experience with PoE switches and which brands they liked best, or even which ones they found were flops and would avoid like the plague.
Thanks fellow networkers.

"Please vote if my suggestion or solution helps. Thanks!"


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#1
August 1, 2010 at 03:20:46
DLink don't you ever try there products ever! You can try Vyatta and Cisco.

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#2
August 1, 2010 at 05:28:14
✔ Best Answer
I really like the the Baystack 5520 PoE switches we've been using at work.

Originally the manufacturer was Baystack. Then Nortel bought them out and the switches became "Nortel Baystack 55x0". Nortel fell on hard times and now a company named Avaya owns them. I'm not sure if they'll keep the "Baystack" part of the name or not but I like the hardware a lot and really like how easy they are to configure.

But, you're looking at just over $5,000.00 per 48 port switch.

If you don't have a big budget for a high-end switch your best bet is to use PoE injectors. You can even buy rack mount PoE devices which are a lot cheaper than an entire new PoE switch. So if you have plenty of ports available on your switches but need to run PoE to some devices, I'd say monetarily speaking, injectors would be the way to go.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
August 1, 2010 at 07:13:40
Thanks for the feedback so far. I started working again for a security company and we're starting to work on more IP related camera projects. The previous IT person implemented a Linksys SRW248G4P 48-port POE switch powering 28 cameras. We're already having some problems with camera frame rates, and while I can't say for sure it's the switch, I'm not really enthused about the Linksys and would probably have preferred something else, no matter how much Cisco attempts to brand the Linksys line as "Cisco Linksys".

"Please vote if my suggestion or solution helps. Thanks!"


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Related Solutions

#4
August 1, 2010 at 07:35:07
I'm also dealing with that kind of project about security cameras but we haven't tried PoEing our cameras to far but I want to implement it in our future clients to we could use the full ability so some of our PoE cameras. So far we are still using Coax and video balun with UTP cables on it. Question Analyst have you tried outdoor wireless in your cameras?

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#5
August 1, 2010 at 12:12:52
I haven't implemented any myself, but at the company I work for they installed a few using EnGenius EOC1650 outdoor AP/Bridges with the previous IT guy and the president of the company says it worked.
When I worked for them before a couple years ago, I did some experiments using outdoor access points recording a Sony SNC 550 PTZ camera to a Sony NSR recorder. The AP's were across the street from each other, almost diagonally across a 6 lane highway with grass median, and not very high up so traffic would go between the AP's. I was able to get about 5 to 6 frames a second MJPEG at VGA resolution I think and fairly good PTZ control. There was intermittent packet loss between the two AP's.

I also did a pretty cool experiment where I had our outside Samsung GVC PTZ camera sending a video stream up through a Kyocera router which used a Verizon PC Aircard for Internet access, then come back down to our office on a T1 line recording to a trial edition of OnSSI running on a virtual Windows XP instance. I was able to get between 2 to 3 frames a second VGA using MJPEG, but the PTZ control was a little choppy.

"Please vote if my suggestion or solution helps. Thanks!"


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#6
August 1, 2010 at 19:32:14
Cool setup. Well we are experimenting on very far connectivity a connection that stretches more than 25kms. I proposed to use Radwin IP Backhaul Winlink 1000 coz I heard Radwin is pretty reliable when it comes to wireless. I told my project coordinator that we need to prove the concept first that the AP's can send 29fraps D1 with a compression of MPEG4/AVC(H.264). We are going to use Samsung Network Cameras. What do you think? Will it work?

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#7
August 2, 2010 at 04:56:45
As long as it can provide the throughput for video stream, don't see why not. Is your company going to install it or a contractor? My preferance is let the experts come up with the solution and put the onus on them for making it work. Figure out what the minimum throughput (not bandwidth) it is you need and tell the contractor that is what you want, then it's up to them to make it work.

"Please vote if my suggestion or solution helps. Thanks!"


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#8
August 2, 2010 at 08:56:20
Actually we're going to set it up on a client. Yeah I all studied that part and I just want a proof of concept and present it to the project managers. It would be so cool if this runs smoothly.

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#9
September 29, 2010 at 15:58:52
Just as a follow-up, it turned out the problem with frame-rates we were having was not with the Cisco Linksys PoE switch after all, but the DVR vendor used an incorrect calculator for spec'ing our hardware needs and the system was under-powered for the amount of processing we were asking it to do. To their credit they fixed the problem at their own expense, even flying someone out on their own dime, so we got that resolved. Would still like to try something else like maybe a Netgear, and not sure we want to try and sell a $5000 switch. Even though the Linksys seems to be working, we used some smaller 8 port ones that refused to take new firmware and the config pages were buggy, and Cisco want's to do their proprietary crap by making you register just to download firmware for the Linksys "business lines" just like they do their regular switches.
Thanks again everyone for your inputs.

www.USACCTV.com


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#10
July 9, 2013 at 07:57:32
Since I originally made this post, I've tried several brand and wanted to give my feedback here:

Cisco PoE switches weren't terrible, but they had some flakiness I saw before in my enterprise networking days days where sometimes you have to statically set port speeds and sometimes it just didn't want to uplink with other brand switches. They also didn't seem to hold up as long as some other brands we tried.

Netgear was easier to work with and lifetime warranty is great, but they had limited selection is form factors for our needs.

Trendnet was ok but same story; their power budgets weren't very big.

Best overall we've found so far for our applications is Etherwan switches. All the form factors we need, they seem pretty solid, VLAN and 802.1x options available and pretty helpful support. Most importantly most of their models give fill 15.4 or 30 watts per port, not limited power budgets. Just wish their warranties were a little longer.

www.USACCTV.com


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