Best Hub/Switch to monitor employees surfing

February 9, 2010 at 07:25:32
Specs: Windows XP
I am having a problem with employees surfing sites for porn and facebook. What is the best switch/hub to monitor what they are surfing in real time? I only need 8 or 16 ports

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#1
February 9, 2010 at 14:43:44
I never knew that a switch had monitoring capabilities.

If the job is getting done, don't worry about it.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
February 10, 2010 at 09:27:47
Employers can be held accountable for their employees actions. Surfing porn and facebook are not what staff are being paid for. Ignoring it is the wrong approach.

You can not monitor internet traffic with a switch or a hub. You need a firewall appliance that does web monitoring.

Something along these lines
http://www.barracudanetworks.com/ns...


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#3
February 10, 2010 at 10:34:35
Spending $500 & living in fear doesn't sound like the right approach either.

I've been a boss many times on many jobs & if the employees were doing the work, I would overlook small things.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#4
February 10, 2010 at 11:31:21
I don't believe you would pay staff to view porn on company time and equipment.

Allowing such behaviour can land you in court for sexual harrassment. Have you not been to sexual harrassment training?

There is far more to be afraid of than the cost of $500. It is the compromise or destruction of your network caused by these employee actions. Both porn and facebook are great sources for trojans/virus/hacker tools embedding.


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#5
February 10, 2010 at 12:33:43
I agree about being concerned, not afraid, of trojans from facebook & porn sites but there are MUCH BETTER ways to handle it than the adversarial path the original poster wants to take. Never make your employees adversaries.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#6
February 10, 2010 at 18:27:26
There is no question here about making the employees adversaries. It is simply a matter of setting required standards of behaviour when it comes to use of company time & resources, and outlining the consequences of non-compliance. A written IT usage policy document is a common thing these days.

1st offense verbal warning. 2nd offense written warning.
3rd transgression dismissal.

Compliance can be made mandatory by use of firewall devices with inbuilt filtering to lock out unwanted URLs, or be left as a voluntary thing but with monitoring capability.

I used to have a netgear router that would send me a log of all URLs visited by each client in my home network. ( I used it to keep an eye on what my kids were doing ) Same principle applies here. As business owner/manager you have a responsibility to to protect yourself and your business from the consequences of IT meltdown, and as wanderer said in response 4, to protect yourself and other employees from possible harassment litigation.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#7
February 10, 2010 at 19:12:37
How one sets required standards is very important. Your 1 2 3 approach is a good way to heighten tension between management & workers.

The idea is to reduce tension but most bosses don't know that.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#8
February 11, 2010 at 02:23:59
We can disagree on management styles but unless you delineate a boundary no one will know when they cross it.

The technical answer the OP seeks can be found however.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#9
February 11, 2010 at 05:59:52
Not to be adversarial or contrary but guapo my friend, your point of view, while admirable, leaves the owner of the company in line for possible litigation as well as criminal charges.

If you look into the legalities you'll find that the owner of a piece of computer equipment used in an illegal fashion can be held liable for any criminal actions that particular piece of equipment is used for.

So let's say one of your employees is a real good hacker who, in his free time at work likes to oh I don't know, try to hack into other peoples servers. Who do you think the police will be talking to when that activity gets traced back to your place of business? If you have no logs that you can use to point at the person responsible, YOU will be held responsible.

Personally, as much as I'd like to be nice to my employees and have them like me. I'd much prefer to have them respect me and log their internet activity because you know what, if it comes to a choice between having people I can replace like me and allowing myself to be charged criminally for something one of them did............well, I'm going to log activity, use those logs to hand the person responsible to the police and then replace him/her and I won't apologize for doing it I'm sorry to say. And, I'd sleep just fine at night to boot!


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#10
February 11, 2010 at 16:03:03
"What if" situations can be discussed forever but my point is that I always tried to get the employees on my side.

The type of job didn't matter. I've been a contractor for a small business computer network, a foreman for a cleaning contractor in a high rise office building & a contractor on small construction jobs.

No matter what, setting boundaries by use of threats, were last resort. Most bosses use them first. I don't & never will.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#11
February 12, 2010 at 07:49:39
Hey guapo, I'm not talking about "what if" situations. It has happened.

Believe me, I like your way of thinking and would totally prefer to work for someone who treats his employees the way you do over the idiot who thinks you have to flog the workers and make them work under constant threat of losing their jobs (I've worked for people like that).

I'm just saying that there is a very good reason the vast majority of businesses, especially bigger ones, cover their butts and log all web traffic, emails and phone calls.

I don't think the two are mutually exclusive either. I believe you could be a great employer and still log. The simple truth is, logging doesn't affect anybody who is doing what they should be. If you, as an employee at a company are using your computer for work and work only, then you won't ever have anything to fear from logging.

The only people that could and would affect are the ones trying to do things they shouldn't, like waste time and your $$$ surfing porn, chatting online, or possibly trying to hack.


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#12
February 12, 2010 at 13:05:10
I really don't have any more to say about my position on the subject but I have one observation.

It couldn't have been a big problem because the original poster hasn't returned to find a solution.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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