Best dial up ISP provider other than PeoplePC & AT&T Dialup

February 7, 2013 at 13:36:57
Specs: Vista Ultimate, SP2, 3.0Ghz/2Ghz
I am helping a friend get set up with a dial up ISP provider. He can only afford dial up right now. After doing some research, I came up with People PC and ATT Dial Up. I know that People PC provides some security software with their service; I'm not sure what ATT provides. Can anyone recommend one or the other? Can anyone recommend a good dial up provider that I didn't mention? Thanks.

See More: Best dial up ISP provider other than PeoplePC & AT&T Dialup

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#1
February 7, 2013 at 14:32:16
Try Localnet. Only $10/month & no special software is required (they'll supply it but you don't need it). Just configure Windows dial-up networking & use IE, Firefox, etc. For security, install one of the freebies - AVG, Avast, or Microsoft Security Essentials. I advise against Netzero or People PC. AT&T is OK but IMO, Localnet is better.

http://www.localnet.com/coverage.cgi

http://www.localnet.com/index.php


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#2
February 8, 2013 at 07:08:08
He used to have localnet but would consistently have dropped connection issues. The problem with the freebies is you have to update them; forget it with a dial up connection! I want to free him from having to do updates and have the ISP take care of that on their end. I put Microsoft Security Essentials on the PC thinking he may be able to use that but I seen where some updates are 70MB in size. Forget that with a modem connection!

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#3
February 8, 2013 at 07:38:09
The problem with the freebies is you have to update them

Having used several free antivirus programs as well as several pay-for-play types over the last 15+ years I can tell you one thing both types have in common is that you must always keep updating the virus database on them.

If you didn't update, how would your AV software "learn" how to find the new viruses written since you installed it?

Simply put, there is no such thing as an AV program that doesn't require updating.

If your friend works somewhere where they have highspeed he could look for a solution that has downloadable "network updates" for the AV software that he could then put on a USB memory key and take home and apply. I'm not sure anybody really does those anymore but you never know. I know several of the AV programs that you have to pay for used to do that for businesses. But it's not something I'd expect to see in the free stuff.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
February 8, 2013 at 10:57:07
AVG have, or at least used to have the facility to download updates for network installation.

There was a configuration item that allowed the user to take updates from the Internet or a local disk. Of course, if they ar taken from a local disk they cant be done automatically, they have to be done manually.

But as CurtR says, there is no such thing as an AV that doesn't need updating. If you didn't they would be useless after a week or two considering the speed at which viruses evolve.

I dont think you are going to get an ISP that is going to run an AV Scan on everything that passes through its servers. It would be horrendously slow and complicated. The best you will get is an EMail providers that will check Emails it receives.

Stuart


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#5
February 10, 2013 at 19:06:30
Folks,

Thanks for your responses. I know virus programs need to be constantly updated. But the problem is my friend will only have a modem connection and downloading any kind of updates is not possible. Been there. Done that. It would take forever. Most things on the internet today expect a user to have some kind of broadband connection. Forget it if you're still using a modem. But due to budgetary constraints, a dial up connection is all he can afford. I will look further into ATT since I already investigated People PC. Thanks again.


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#6
February 10, 2013 at 19:15:23
Just thought of something. The connection jacks in my friends home were coroded and had to be replaced. The phone company says all is fine now. But this makes me think wheter the problem he's been having with dropped connections was due to the faulty wall jacks in the first place! I can call him on the phone with no problem; when he gets on the internet, that's when the dropped connections start. Who knows what causes it but it may be due to the ISP and also he's located in a remote area that's probably not close to a local office of the phone company. He lives about ten mile outside of Reading, PA. He says his neighbors also have connection problems. It may be something he just needs to live with.

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#7
February 11, 2013 at 07:48:05
First off, you were given an idea for updating antivirus software by me and StuartS followed up with a confirmation that this can be done with AVG.

Second, I lived on an acreage 30 miles from the city prior to moving where I am now. I used dialup for the year and a half to two years I lived there. I never had issues with dropped connections. I did have issues with the connection being much lower than I'd like (ie: 24.4 baud instead of 56.6) but that was due to the distances we were spanning. I had the phone company tech out twice checking my lines for interference and putting a filter in place. None of which improved my situation. But, that might help in your friend's situation so maybe he can get their tech out to test the lines for noise and interference.

If he's still having the issue after they leave, have him try a different modem.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#8
July 8, 2013 at 13:24:22
Sometimes you have to get back to the basics. Try America Online. It has been around for years and it is very dependable. Plans starting at $11.99 a month. Hope it works out!

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