Adding a second network.

September 28, 2012 at 22:48:22
Specs: Windows, 32gig : )
Hi guys.
I'm a newb at this stuff and hope someone will take pity on me and point me in the right direction?

In a nutshell, we run a SBS2008 server at work with 20 users. Our company has a domain name which, via DNS hosting is pointed to our static IP. Email address's are handled via the server using Exchange 2007. Documents and files are stored on a data drive on the server (lets call it Server 1). We have now setup a second business with a different domain. I now have 10 users who will need access to the files on Server 1, but will run under a different domain (and need different email addresses) and need to have access to files stored on Server 1 and the new Server 2. The current setup is simple. ADSL comes into the server room and goes to a modem/wireless. From there it goes to the server which handles the DHCP. The server is in turn connected to a 24 port switch which then feeds the workstations. I have access to purchase another server and whatever hardware is required. No amount of Googling matches my scenario hence my question. What I'm really after is a mudmap showing setup or the right way to set this up.

Happy to accept any suggestions or criticism from all.

Kevson


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#1
September 29, 2012 at 06:51:04
So in a nutshell, you want to have two separate domains that will be:

- sharing a single internet connect
- domain 2 needs access to the file server in domain 1

I'm no expert on Exchange and email so I'm not going to comment on that. I suspect you can run both domain's email through a single exchange server, but can't say for sure. Hopefully someone else can help you with that.


Questions:

- Are the two domains within in the same Forest or are they completely separate?

- Other than access to the data server 1, do you need/require access between the two domains or do you need them segmented and separate?

- You said your internet goes into a "modem/wireless" Are you referring to a "combination" device that is a modem, router, and wireless access point all in one? If so, is this a SOHO level device?

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
September 29, 2012 at 07:00:13
Upon rereading your post I noticed something I missed the first time:

From there it goes to the server which handles the DHCP. The server is in turn connected to a 24 port switch which then feeds the workstations.

If that server isn't doing RRAS, routing or anything other than providing DHCP for your network, you could actually have your setup as follows:

Internet >> Switch >> Server(s) & Clients

You don't actually have to have all traffic flowing through the server since DHCP client broadcasts will reach the DHCP server setup as I outlined above.

Setup that way, it would remove one choke point in your network and take that load off the server. Ideally, you never want to put any unnecessary load on a server and unless there's a specific reason for setting it up the way you did, running all traffic through that server is extra (unnecessary) load.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
September 29, 2012 at 14:54:49
Hi Curt.

Thanks for the reply so quickly!

As you described, we have 1 office with say 30 workstations. company A has a domain address of upstairs.com and the new company (you guessed it) is downstairs.com. All users will eventually need access to both companies data. I believe your right regarding hosting both domains on the same server (as I currently have this working) but unless I am missing something, the send address will always be the primary domain name for that server. No amount of research shows me how I can change the default domain for users. I could setup emails elsewhere but that defeats the purpose and an extra server as you mentioned will split the load placed on the current server.

The modem/wireless is just our internet connection and the wireless is used by several when they work outside of their office.The server handles all the DHCP and DHCP is obviously disabled on the modem.

The modem is configured as 192.168.1.1 and the server is 192.168.1.2 - all workstations flow from there - 192.168.1 .3, *.4 etc.

I drew myself a mudmap and while it looks simple, experience has shown me it won't be.

I had the adsl coming in the building to the modem - then the server was plugged into the modem as was the router. All workstations were then connected to router. For the additional server / domain, I imagined it would be as simple as adding a second server and router (connected to the modem) and simply connecting the workstations to the second router and that would be it. A second NIC would be required on each workstation I guessed.

Then I thought about subnets and that the 2 networks couldn't see each other. And then.....

At this point, I decided to ask in this forum as reading previous discussions, you guys seem to be switched on : )

Basically, I just need pointing in the right direction otherwise I'm going to end up spending weekends and nights trying to work out where I *ucked up.

Happy to listen to anyone with an idea.

Kevson



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#4
September 30, 2012 at 07:24:34
I suspect the simplest way to set this up would be with two routers and two switches.

Assumptions:
- Domain A (upstairs.com) is the original domain and is already connected to the internet
- Domain A is using 192.168.1.0/24
- Domain B will be using 192.168.2.0/24

Requirements:
- Full network access to services between the two domains
- Full internet access through a single external connection

Domain A (upstairs.com)
Router 1:
LAN IP: 192.168.1.1
SM: 255.255.255.0
DHCP enabled = Yes
DHCP Scope = 192.168.1.100 through to 192.168.1.199
DHCP Default Gateway IP (as given to clients): 192.168.1.1

Domain B (downstairs.com)
Router 2:
LAN IP: 192.168.2.1
SM: 255.255.255.0
DHCP enabled = Yes
DHCP Scope = 192.168.2.100 through to 192.168.2.199
DHCP Default Gateway IP (as given to clients): 192.168.2.1

I would have two separate switches, one for each domain.
I would daisychain router 2 to router 1 and I would interconnect them LAN port on router 1 to WAN port router 2

I would then connect one switch to each router and that domain's client computers and printers (etc) to the appropriate switch.

You would have to configure a static route from the 192.168.1.0/24 domain to the 192.168.2.0/24 domain on router 2 so that you would have full communication between subnets. By default, 192.168.2.0/24 would have communication to 192.168.1.0/24 when you setup router 2.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#5
September 30, 2012 at 17:51:51
Perfect!

Many thanks Curt.

It's a Public Holiday here in Oz today and I'm almost tempted to go in to work and start on this : )

I'll be sure to post the results as soon as it's up and running,

Appreciate your assistance.

Kevson.


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#6
October 1, 2012 at 03:34:02
HI,

Routing and switching is good in Networking.

Thanks


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#7
October 1, 2012 at 07:47:49
Good luck!

Do pop back and let me know if you get it working and if not, get back to me and let me know and I'll do what I can to help.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#8
October 2, 2012 at 12:54:19
I had to chime in here.

Be aware that there can only be one SBS server on a domain. If you add another SBS server to an existing SBS domain, they will begin shutting down every hour after 7 days. This is to allow for Migration scenarios.

You can, however, add multiple domains to Exchange 2007/SBS2008, but only one can be the primary and this is what all users will use as their default "send as" domain. So while you can have both upstairs.com and downstairs.com on the same Exchange/SBS server, and receive mail properly for both (assuming you have the proper MX records configured) your users will still end up as sending mail from either user@upstairs.com or user@downstairs.com depending on the global primary setting.

Another problem in this scenario is that even though they are two separate companies, they need access to the same data. This is the hard part as SBS does not support either implicit or explicit trusts with other domains or forests. Does either company have to actively modify data from the other, or is downstairs.com simply going to be using the data from upstairs.com as a historical reference.

If both need to modify data, you may have to look at some sort of cloud solution for data storage that can be accessed by both companies regardless of their domain membership. If it is only for archival purposes, then you can have 2 separate companies, each with their own server, network, and simply sharing an internet connection.

Let me know your thoughts or if you need more clarification.

-----
IT Desktop & Network Consultant - MOS Master Certified, MCP, MCSA, MCITP - Windows 7, CCNA Certificate Pending, A+, Network +

::geek::


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