acess denied on many pages

January 27, 2019 at 06:52:36
Specs: all, all
On some pages I get access denied. I can use a VPN to get around it, so I always figure it was my IP. Well turns out a new ip is not fixing it, so I tried on my server (ubuntu). Some pages work?

Error I get on computers

Access Denied

You don't have permission to access "http://www.homedepot.com/" on this server. Reference #18.79133b8.1548513916.632fd5c

examples
I'm able to get to usps.com on my linux box but on my computer in the house I get access denied.
I'm not able to get to homedepot.com on my linux box and not on my computer in the house (access denied).

I tried turning off ufw on linux but I get the same results. How could the domain know what computer I'm on if I'm using nat?

Even if I by pass the linux server I can not get to these pages but in all cases my mobile data will, or a vpn will. I have over 20 device on this network and they all have the same issue.


See More: acess denied on many pages

Report •

#1
January 27, 2019 at 13:18:09
Have you turned the router power off for half a minute - it can sometimes help?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#2
January 27, 2019 at 13:27:35
Both sites you mention give a 301 redirect to their https sites, so try going to https://www.homedepot.com/. If that works, something's blocking your redirects. If it doesn't, something's wrong with your SSL.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#3
January 27, 2019 at 15:19:37
Are you in an Asian country? I'm in the Philippines and get the same access denied.
It seems Home Depot blocks certain IP address pools

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 27, 2019 at 15:23:26
Also check that a proxy setting hasn't been invoked... I find "occasionally" on my Mac (el capitan) that somehow a couple of proxy settings are invoked (not by me) and then some, but not all, sites are unable to connect...

A very long shot I appreciate, but who knows..?


Report •

#5
January 27, 2019 at 16:27:43
Hi guys, I found a way around my IP dilemma. I ordered a static IP to force a change. After that, the IP had to be changed and all sites now work. I'm not sure why the server was allowing some pages to work, this is all very strange. Though it truly is some sort of national block IP list these companies are using.

The other odd thing is that my dynamic IP never changed. I have had the same IP for many months. Thus the need to go static to force the change. Going to drop the static and go back to dynamic hoping someone else has that IP now.

None of this would have ever been needed if ATT was competent. Al I needed, is what I asked for, a new dynamic IP.


Report •

#6
January 27, 2019 at 16:41:31
One way to force a change for the IP address your isp dishes out to you is to power down the router for a while. Go fora walk, or have a longish tea break...; then power up the router, and there’s a good chance your IP address will be a new one. Ocassionaly one might need to dothe power down for anhour or three; even overnight...

But your approach seems to be another option, albeit a PIA to effect?


Report •

#7
January 28, 2019 at 10:18:58
Further to #6 I've found that if you have a dynamic address you can force a change "almost immediately" by powering off the router and putting it back on again. I've found it handy on freebie download sites that force you to wait for an hour or so to use them again unless you pay. They monitor your IP address so you just change it....

Aw shucks I must have criminal instincts.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#8
January 28, 2019 at 10:24:01
I had multiple 24 hours power outs. I live in FL, and hurricanes kill power for days. Damn IP never changed.

Report •

#9
January 28, 2019 at 13:55:15
ulaouao

I am in the UK so maybe things are different here or perhaps it depends on the server. I can change the address at will at any time although I can't control what it will happen to be, just a different one.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#10
January 28, 2019 at 14:00:16
"I had multiple 24 hours power outs. I live in FL, and hurricanes kill power for days. Damn IP never changed. "
That I never heard of before. Years ago when we were just switching over from dial ups to cable, there were times that hackers picked up or maybe followed IP addresses and launched attacks to overwhelm the router's firewalls and you could not do much during that (maybe they found some who just plugged their computers into the modems and got it bad until they learned better). We always just unplugged the router for a minute and plugged it back in and were up and running in no time. Eventually I guess the ISP's would better protect against these so they stopped as far as I can tell but for a long time, I reset the IP address every few weeks like that.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#11
January 28, 2019 at 14:09:59
The other way sites keep a tab on when you visited is via a specific type of cookie. It’s in effect a tracker with a time stamp.

If one deletes that cookie the site doesn’t know when last you were there. That type of cookie is used by sites trying to lure, trick you into signing up for whatever, or accepting the first price offered for say a flight etc... when you go back within their time frame, as st inthe cookie, that initial offer has gone and you’re being offered others - which invariably are less attractive; but you can’t get the first one. Delete the sites cookies and you ‘re back to a first time visit situation...


Report •

#12
January 28, 2019 at 14:39:48
Yeah this is new to me also, att uverse. My other ISP always change it for me, monthly. I should have the dynamic back soon, ill play with the suggestions.

Report •

#13
January 30, 2019 at 12:45:58
Get this, just had my static ip for a day or two and we just now changed back to dynamic, STILL! got the same damn dynamic number. This is friggen dumb!

message edited by ulaoulao


Report •

#14
January 30, 2019 at 12:50:17
Ok something occurred to me. The modem is connected to a mini battery backup, that may just be enough to hold a charge to cache the IP. Although I did try rebooting the modem by pulling its power, that may not be enough. So going to disconnect it while we go out to eat. Here is hoping.

Report •

#15
February 3, 2019 at 09:24:29
Turns out att techs and support do not know how their network works. After getting a few new modems and going to static and back it turns out the DHCP is a fixed DHCP. When you sign up they assign you an ip and it follows you evan if you move. The only way to change it is to cancel the service and open a new service.

Report •

#16
February 3, 2019 at 09:37:39
Not so good then but it seems your delving paid off. Thanks for letting us know.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#17
February 3, 2019 at 09:42:27
Paid off, but not paid back. At this point they should pay me for doing their tech job.

Report •

#18
February 3, 2019 at 16:27:06
If you're sure you're IP blocked,try using a free vpn or proxy, like Tor. If it works through that, then you are IP blocked. If not, it's something else. If you have to fix SSH to get your vpn/proxy working, you probably aren't IP blocked, and you fixed your access to all sites.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#19
February 3, 2019 at 20:48:34
Look at pricing for competing services, you may be better going with a cable service instead, etc.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#20
February 4, 2019 at 05:49:40
VPN, was my workaround as mentioned above. Just sick of it.

I do like cable better but Spectrum took over and they really are bad. Going to stick with att and fight this but if I don't get it, it's back to Spectrum. Google never could get in to my area, that would have been nice.


Report •

Ask Question