Solved Access computer in LAN outside subnet mask

June 12, 2012 at 13:08:18
Specs: Windows XP
I have old interface hardware with Static IP 10.2.2.200 and on the same switch I have computers with IPs of 10.4.1.0
If I change subnet to 255.0.0.0 old hardware with 10.2.2.200 will be accessible.
The problem is that I would like to have 255.255.255.0 as subnet but it should still be possible to access 10.2.2.200.
Can I add Static route for oldhardware in XP without adding gateway settings?
The most simple would be to put all on same subnet but it is not possible due to a various reasons.
The computers are running Windows XP

See More: Access computer in LAN outside subnet mask

Report •

✔ Best Answer
June 13, 2012 at 05:38:28
Rightclick the LAN-Connection, choose properties.
Choose Internet Protocol TCP/IP, click properties.
At the general page, the first manually configured ip address is shown.
Click Advanced button.
On IP-Addresses, click add, to add an additional ip address.
You don't need to add another gateway address, cause by adding a secondary ip address, you are in the same subnet as the computers in question.
Therefore an additional gateway address is not needed.
Click Ok til all windows are closed.

Should work.



#1
June 12, 2012 at 13:42:52
If the computers are not on the same subnet then you need a router for them to communicate with each other; a switch is not enough. What's the problem with just using the 255.0.0.0 net mask? It is the natural one for a class A network.

The point of subnetting is to isolate networks; that is exactly what you have done. Now you want to undo it.


Report •

#2
June 12, 2012 at 14:14:59
Thanks for the reply ijack,
I don't see any direct problem with the 255.0.0.0 just curious of what problems it can cause, the solution seemed to good to be true :-)

What can cause problems with this netmask is that their are also redundant ethernet ports on the same PCs with range IP 10.4.2.0 and for whatever reason someone connect to the wrong LAN port the 10.4.2 traffic will start flowing in 10.4.1.0 network since the netmask will allow this traffic?


Report •

#3
June 12, 2012 at 14:38:07
using 255.248.0.0 would be more precise. It gives you a range of 10.0.0.0 - 10.7.255.255

with that subnet mask then yes 10.4.1.0 would be talking on the network. But that really doesn't matter since its talking on the network and you would never notice the difference.

I would have set the 2nd nic to be dhcp client and avoided the whole mess assigning static ips on the 2nd nic causes.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
June 12, 2012 at 16:14:39
You can also simply add a second ip address of the subnet 10.2.2.0/24 to your network card.

Report •

#5
June 12, 2012 at 23:59:55
Paulsep,
This is what I want, but can you be more precise on how to achieve this on a windows XP machines?

Report •

#6
June 13, 2012 at 05:38:28
✔ Best Answer
Rightclick the LAN-Connection, choose properties.
Choose Internet Protocol TCP/IP, click properties.
At the general page, the first manually configured ip address is shown.
Click Advanced button.
On IP-Addresses, click add, to add an additional ip address.
You don't need to add another gateway address, cause by adding a secondary ip address, you are in the same subnet as the computers in question.
Therefore an additional gateway address is not needed.
Click Ok til all windows are closed.

Should work.


Report •

#7
June 13, 2012 at 12:47:27
Thanks,

I am not sure how it's working in detail with 2 ip on the same network interface, never seen that done before and from what I know it should not be possible.

I don't like it when i don't understand how things works but it seems to work fine so thanks again.
Have to stay up late and google it i guess.


Report •

#8
June 13, 2012 at 13:10:52
How does this address this issue of if the user plugs the network cable into the wrong nic? It doesn't

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#9
June 13, 2012 at 14:49:35
As far as I have understand from subnet rules it does.

I can now have netmask 255.255.255.0 on all interfaces.
This means that if someone plugs in LAN2 10.4.2.0/24 in the LAN1 10.4.1.0/24 this information will not be received in LAN 1 port because the mask will isolate it.


Report •

#10
June 13, 2012 at 15:06:14
I see. You didn't supernet. You just added both subnets to the same card. That will work.

Might want to review your ip plan. Its gotten messy and its going to bite you in the butt down the road.

Best of luck.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

Ask Question