2nd router -subnet for data traffic isolation

August 2, 2011 at 22:07:24
Specs: Windows Vista
I want to create a home surveillance system using IP cameras but want to avoid overwhelming my main LAN with intense data traffic from the cameras.
Here’s what I am looking for:
I have a few IP cameras and a NAS which supports a video surveillance server. It works fairly well but there is massive network chatter when the cameras are active, which impede my main LAN speed.
So I want to separate my LAN in 2 sections served by different network switches for heavy traffic isolation (not for security purposes).

I have a main wired/wireless router sitting behind my cable modem which serves most of my LAN needs (let’s call this LAN-1).
I have a second router which I want to use it behind router-1, to create a sort of a nested LAN that connects only the wireless IP cameras and the NAS/video surveillance server, so that all the heavy communication between the surveillance devices stays at this level (we can call this LAN-2).

The trick here is that I do need to be able to access the NAS from LAN-2 using the computers connected by LAN-1. Besides the NAS, I obviously want to be able to reach the surveillance server or view individual IP cameras from LAN-1 or even, hopefully, the internet from a remote location.

Please help. Thank you in advance.


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#1
August 3, 2011 at 07:36:20
Click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “Add a second Router to your LAN

You're going to want to use the scenario for separate subnets which include interconnecting the two routers "LAN port to WAN port".

If you put the surveillance system on the downstream router and create a static route between subnets on router2, then you should have no problem segmenting it's traffic away from your LAN and still be able to access it from the LAN.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
August 3, 2011 at 19:50:18
Curt, thank you for your prompt reply. So router-2 DHCP is enabled so that it will give 192.168.1.xx addresses to its own clients.
One question regarding static routing:
My router contains the following fields for configuring routing.
-a route name and designator for user reference
- Destination LAN IP
- Subnet Mask
- Gateway
- Interface (LAN & Wireless or WAN).
The way I picture a route is to link an origin address to a destination address or, the way I would prefer for my application - from any LAN client to any of the LAN-2 subnet IP cameras or surveillance server.
Well, I only see a destination in my router settings.
Could you please give me a couple of pointers considering my application and my router fields in order to open the LAN-2 clients to the ones from LAN? Do I also need to create multiple routes for all the clients variants?
As you see, I am pretty new at this.
Thanks a lot.

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#3
August 4, 2011 at 07:49:43
I can't see routing tables differing too much from one device to another although what you're posting is odd to my way of thinking.

Here's an MS article on routing as per the command prompt window in XP:

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/...

Give it a read. If it still doesn't make sense, then do some googling on the subject of adding routes in a routing table.

Typically you add a route from one network to another. I suspect from the looks of what you posted above, your router is assuming you're always going to be routing from the subnet on it's LAN and uses that as the default "source". If that's true, that's too bad as it isn't as flexible as if it were a normal routing table.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
August 4, 2011 at 22:18:54
No matter what i threw at Router-2: nothing worked.

I got it working though, but only after I linked the two subnets by creating a static route on Router-1, looking like this:
- Destination LAN IP: 192.168.1.0 (LAN-2)
- Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
- Gateway: 192.168.0.2 (WAN IP for Router-2)
- Interface: LAN&WLAN

Here's where I found my clues:
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.ph...


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#5
August 5, 2011 at 07:10:38
I'm glad you got it figured out. I see I'm going to have to revise my tutorial again. To be honest, I had quite forgotten that to have the traffic flow in both directions on router 2, you had to put that route in router 1.

My guide was for separating the subnets so I was only thinking about the flow through router 2 as going towards router 1 only.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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