2 Router-Security Questions:

Ultimate Windows 7 ultimate 64-bit
December 19, 2010 at 04:58:00
Specs: Windows 7-64
Any guidance on these router-access-security issues I'm facing?

(1) INTERNET-ACCESS PROBLEM:

I'm guesting in another person's flat. She has broadband and, hooked up to it by cable, she has an ASUS RT-G32 Wireless Router, for which she has lost all paperwork. My computer can connect to it and access the net wirelessly, but her ASUS router has NO encryption -- meaning that using it wirelessly is NOT secure.

At the same time, I also have my OWN ENCRYPTION-ENABLED Netgear Wireless -G54 Router WGR614, which my notebook computer is already programmed to access, much as it had successfully done in a previous location where my computer had successfuly wirelessly -- and securely -- accessed the net via this Netgear router.

So, THE PROBLEM:

The wireless connection, and full access to the net, via her ASUS router (which is connected to her broadband cable), works fine. But when I connect MY Netgear router directly to her broadband cable, and my computer connects wirelessly to my Netgear router (-- it does log-in properly to the router, same as would happen at my previous location --), there is NO internet-access.

And when I comand my computer to investigate the broblem, it says that there's a problem with the router and suggests unplugging the router and waiting and then plugging the router in again and trying again. Well, I've done that, and it doesn't help.

SO THE QUESTIONS ARE:

Why is it that HER router (connected to her broadband-cable) gives me wireless connection to the net, but MY router (connected to her broadband-cable) gives me wireless connection ONLY TO MY ROUTER and NOT to the net? Is there something I can do to make my MY router wok directly with her broadband, so that I can ditch using her router entirely?


(2) RELATED ROUTER-SECURITY PROBLEM:

As a consequence of the above situation, I've "piggybacked" my Netgear router on top of her ASUS router -- so that my router takes a cable-feed directly from her router and re-transmits the signal -- and then I've had my computer log in securely to MY router; and this gives me access to the net.

BUT THEN I HAVE THESE QUESTIONS:

Is this way of my accessing the net -- via a secure wireless link to MY router (which takes its signal from HER router) -- really secure? Or, since my router is taking the signal (via a cable) from her INSECURE router, is my access to the net, and my transmission or reception of any data, or even any data on my computer, NOT secure after all?

NOTE: One piece if information that might be helpful: Normally, to access my Netgear router's settings, I would go to URL 192.168.1.1, and my router's log-in page would come up. But now, when I do that -- and even though I've made sure that I'm logged-in to MY router's signal and not hers -- the ASUS log-in page (identifying itself as RT-G32 and asking for a username and password) comes up. ... But even so, it seems to me that I should not need to log-in to my router's settings anyway, to resolve the above issues -- or should I?

Any guidance on these issues would be appreciated.


See More: 2 Router-Security Questions:

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#1
December 19, 2010 at 05:47:39
There are a number of issues at work here and since you are getting your internet from your flatmate anyway why didn't you just download the user manual for her router, log into it's user interface and set up security encryption?

If you would prefer to use your router instead of hers then try this. Connect a PC directly to the modem. It should get internet. Run ipconfig /all in Command prompt box and write down the IP and DNS details.
Now turn off the modem, attach your router's WAN port to the modem. Attach your PC to the router LAN port. Then turn on modem. wait 1 minute. Turn on router & wait 1 minute. Turn on PC. Do you get internet? Open web browser and log into your router's admin interface and look at the WAN settings page. Is it getting an IP from the ISP?

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#2
December 19, 2010 at 06:24:03
Why is it that HER router (connected to her broadband-cable) gives me wireless connection to the net, but MY router (connected to her broadband-cable) gives me wireless connection ONLY TO MY ROUTER and NOT to the net?

You need to correctly configure your router to interface with hers before you'll get internet on your client connected to your router. If you click on my name above in my response and read my "how-to" guide on adding a second router you'll see info on how to correctly connect it with a network cable. Pay attention to the "LAN port to LAN port" scenario.

If you're connecting your router wirelessly to her's, you would have to bridge the connection.

Is there something I can do to make my MY router wok directly with her broadband, so that I can ditch using her router entirely

Yes, plug her broadband connection into your WAN port and see if it works. If it does, problem solved. If not, you may need to call her ISP for connection specific settings to apply to the WAN side of your router.

Oh, you could google for a manual or setup guide for her router. A search string like "make/model + manual" or "make/model + setup guide" should suffice. But I would try your router first.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
December 19, 2010 at 07:12:40
Richard,

Thanks for the suggestion. However, as to your suggestion that I attach m computer to the modem, THERE IS NO MODEM, only the broadband-cable and the 2 routers.


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Related Solutions

#4
December 19, 2010 at 09:04:25
compare the ip address you get with each router.

Are they in the same subnet? If they are you can't route thru your router due to this. You would need to change your lan subnet to something different

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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#5
December 19, 2010 at 15:08:00
" THERE IS NO MODEM, only the broadband-cable and the 2 routers."

Right there is the explanation for why you cannot get internet by connecting your router to the broadband cable. There absolutely has to be a modem. I'll bet your flatmate's unit is a combination modem/router. Since yours is only a router it cannot communicate directly with the broadband.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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