2 routers different DNS to fake location to watch movies

October 25, 2012 at 09:42:34
Specs: Windows 7
Hi
Have a look at the diagram showing my router/modem setup here: http://screencast.com/t/TYtzQf1qLAs.

I'm not sure the proper terminology or how to say this but I would like Router A to broadcast 1 IP and and Router B to broadcast another.

For "business" reasons I need my "normal" IP on router A and for "pleasure" reasons, I want to have different DNS on router b.

I'm in canada and I'm using a DNS service to make it appear like I'm from the US... however, I only want router B to do this.

Possible?


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#1
October 25, 2012 at 10:07:50
Link doesn't work

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#2
October 25, 2012 at 10:16:19
My bad! Try this link for the diagram: http://screencast.com/t/TYtzQf1qLAs

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#3
October 25, 2012 at 10:27:54
If I'm understanding your needs correctly you want to end up with 2 separate networks that don't speak to each other that are sharing one internet connection.

If this is correct, the big question is, your modem, is it a combo unit (ie: combination modem, router, and access point) with 4 LAN ports, or is it just a modem only.

If it's just a modem only, you're going to need a 3'd router in order to accommodate two more, separate networks each requiring it's own router as well.

Router 1 would be connected directly to the modem with the other two routers connected to it's LAN ports. Those uplinks would go to the "WAN" (external, internet) port on the downstream routers and would be configured with different subnets. NOTE: if your modem is actually a combo unit the same applies and it's Router 1.

Router 1
LAN Settings:
IP: 192.168.1.1
SM: 255.255.255.0

Router 2
WAN Settings:
IP: 192.168.1.2
SM: 255.255.255.0
LAN Settings:
IP: 192.168.2.1
SM: 255.255.255.0

Router 3
WAN Settings:
IP: 192.168.1.3
SM: 255.255.255.0
LAN Settings:
IP: 192.168.3.1
SM: 255.255.255.0

You would configure DHCP on router's 2 and 3 to give out IP's within their associated LAN subnet.

For more info click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “Add a second Router to your LAN

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
October 25, 2012 at 10:39:24
if it matters my modem has ports in the back so I'm guessing it's a combo modem? in that case do I proceed with your instructions and assume router 1 is the modem?

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#5
October 25, 2012 at 12:06:05
I would verify that it is a router as well as a modem first and if it is, then yes, that would be router 1.

You can google the model name to find out the specifics about the specifications of the unit.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
October 25, 2012 at 14:42:48
Thanks Curt!
It's a Cisco DPC3825. Just googled it and it is in fact a modem/router... that being said woudl I need all 3? Could I use the Cisco (what I thought was the modem) and a second router?

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#7
October 25, 2012 at 15:19:27
Yes you could, however, if you do that, whatever devices are connected to the second (downstream) router would also be able to access all devices on the 1st router.

So if you only have one network you wish segregated, you would connect those devices to the downstream router.

If however you want both networks separate from each other, then you'd require one router per network.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#8
October 25, 2012 at 19:04:28
When you say "connected to the second" you mean physically with a cable or wireless?



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#9
October 26, 2012 at 07:19:04
Either or, or both at the same time............wired and/or wireless clients.

Keep in mind, if you want separate, segrated networks, the SSID's on both downstream router's should also be different so as to make it easier to figure out what to connect each wireless device to. I would recommend SSID's that easily identify each network. "Work" and "Home" or something like that.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#10
October 26, 2012 at 08:58:36
Also, would it make it easier to remove one of the routers... for example can I have this setup: http://screencast.com/t/D1kCxysz5Z and accomplish the same thing?

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#11
October 26, 2012 at 09:18:08
As I said in response #7, if you only want one segregated network, then you only need two routers and the second (downstream) router will be separated from the rest of your network.

Here's the thing. With the above setup (two routers) whatever is plugged into the downstream router will have access to the network contained on the upstream router because in order for the LAN side of router 2 to have internet access, it will have to have a route to that network in order to reach the DNS/Gateway. This route is created by the router when you connect and properly configure it.

In your diagram you have "DNS Service" beside the network on the right hand side. Why is that?

Once you have the downstream router configure correctly, it will get it's DNS from the upstrream router.

Here's the two router, one separated network:

Router 1 (connected to internet)
LAN Settings
IP: 192.168.1.1
SM: 255.255.255.0
DNS/Gateway are handled internally by router

DHCP Enabled = Yes
DHCP Scope: 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.199

Router 2
WAN (external) Settings
IP: 192.168.1.2
SM: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1
DNS: 192.168.1.1

LAN Settings
IP: 192.168.2.1
SM: 255.255.255.0
DNS/Gateway are handled internally by router

DHCP Enabled = Yes
DHCP Scope: 192.168.2.100 to 192.168.2.199
Further DHCP Settings for router 2 are:
DNS/Default Gateway = 192.168.2.1

Transitions from LAN side to WAN side in both cases are handled internally by the router. Because the WAN side of router 2 is configured to connect to the LAN side of router 1, this gives all clients connected to router 2 access to the LAN clients of router 1. This is necessary in order to give them internet access. However, LAN clients on router 1 DO NOT have access to clients on router 2.

As I stated above, if you want to separated networks, you would need 3 routers.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#12
October 26, 2012 at 09:28:57
Can you explain what is the downstream and the upstream router? I think I'll be able to better understand this knowing what hey are.

The "DNS Service" is a service that asks me to change my DNS entries on my router so that I can appear to be surfing from the US. This is so that I can watch those free tv streaming channels which are not available from canada.

however, I don't fully trust those DNS as they could be sniffing for secure/sensitive data... which is why I broke up my network in 2 as shown in the diagram... that way all sensitive data will only be sent through devices connected to router 1 "omis" and all the devices used for "streaming media" or connected to the second router "butloo" will never have sensitive data going through it.

Obviously, the important part here is to make sure the DNS service never sees the data flowing through the "omis" router.


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#13
October 26, 2012 at 13:48:37
All my posts above are moot and useless in light of this last post of yours so ignore them.

First off let me just say, I'm not sure I'm buying this stuff about needing to fake a US IP address to access a free TV show. If they're giving it away for free, they don't give a crap where in the world it's transmitted to. Considering the US has much stricter censorship than Canada, it's much more likely to have online TV shows from Canada blocked in the US than the other way around.

I live in Canada too so why don't you post a link and I'll see if I can't connect and stream this TV show of which you speak without faking a US IP address.

Having said that.................I'm trying to figure out how to explain this to you so it makes sense.

Without knowing what you mean by "sensitive data" I'm going to be the optimist and assume you mean something like making online purchases and you're worried about your credit card information.

Assuming the above scenario, let's say you sit at your computer and you're going to simultaneously:
- Connect to your TV show
and
- Purchase something online.

You have one router and all data passes through it to the internet. First, you connect to your TV show and start streaming it. It is it's own discrete connection and data stream.

Then you open your web browser and connect to your bank. An encrypted session is created that is also a discrete. The information you send to the bank does not leave that encrypted session and jump magically over into the other data stream to be picked out by this DNS service. The DNS service and the TV show you'r streaming is never aware of it.

If you open 10 tabs in Internet Explorer and go to ten separate websites, your data isn't broadcast to all 10. Each is independant and discrete with only the data relating directly to them going to them.

So what I'm saying is, you don't require a "secure" or "separate" subnet at home to hide your "sensitive data" from the DNS service. They can only be aware of what you send them directly. So you don't need extra routers and such.

Yes, it's possible you'll have to connect to a DNS service in order to stream a TV show from the US but you can rest assured that you can do so safely without the DNS service seeing any of your "sensitive data"

Keep in mind though, that all data leaving your network has to go through your ISP in order to get to the internet. It is after all your gateway (door) to the internet. Also, keep in mind they can, and do, keep logs of all traffic. So if you're doing something you don't want others to know about, don't kid yourself and think you can hide it, you can't.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#14
October 26, 2012 at 14:47:14
I think there is also a misunderstanding about how this works.

Changing what dns server is being used on either side of a router makes no different as far as what country you are coming from.

That is detemined by your wan/public ip. You can't change that. Period.

This is not to be confused with using a VPN service that allows you to connect to a US server and come out it to the internet with a US ip address. Some routers, I have read, support doing this on their wan interface.

This is used around the world to avoid censorship in places like Iran and China. Its also used to get around country web site access restrictions which is what we are talking about here.

If you change "dns service" to "vpn service" everything makes sense.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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#15
October 26, 2012 at 18:29:43
Curt
check out www.hulu.com. Try to watch a tv show and you'll get this error: http://screencast.com/t/7zn4VJaM9ip5

In terms of censorship... yes I'm aware that my ISP and probably some fancy government agency can see what I'm doing and quite honestly, I have nothing to hide (except for my passwords and my banking info). All I'm trying to achieve here is have access to those free channels only available from the US.

I googled a bunch of dirty way where you can hijack your IP (google Gpass or proxy list DOT org) but who knows who's behind those addresses and I simply don't trust it. That's why I thought having 2 routers would do the trick


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#16
October 27, 2012 at 07:40:55
Ok, I checked it out and you're correct. They will only stream to the US. Call me old fashioned but, I watch TV on my TV (gotta love being able to record right to my satellite reciever) where the screen is ever so much larger and I have a nice home theater system connected. This is why I had never heard of hulu before.

Read wanderer's post. He's 100% correct about the IP, not DNS, being what they (hulu.com) check to verify your location. I missed that because I was all concentrated on something else.

In fact, he's 100% correct about everything he said.

I was also right in my last post about you not needing any special setup beyond a single router.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#17
October 28, 2012 at 07:22:36
google this and review the services available to you

us vpn service free

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


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