Solved Cant install osx on macbook pro after clean

July 26, 2016 at 05:48:12
Specs: osx, 1ghz? /512mb
Hi a friend gave me a macbook pro and said it was cleaned but cant work out how to install/reinstall osx. It wants to install yosemite via the internet. I have plugged in the ethernet cable. Sorry mac's are not my field so will do my best to describe whats happening. Whatever i do it asks for my apple id which i have entered and it didnt like it. Maybe its after the former owners id? I tried to use a snow leopard dvd but i am getting no further with that either. OK booted machine and is shows the 'osx utilities' and the choices r1.restore from time machine backup, 2. reinstall os x 3. get help online and 4. disk utility. Tried everything and getting nowhere

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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✔ Best Answer
July 28, 2016 at 01:19:36
Specs for a Macbook Pro

https://support.apple.com/kb/sp583?...

I was correct first time.. The max RAM for a Macbook Pron is 8Gig - not 16Gig...

The Mac Mini is max RAM of 16Gig.

Hard drives in both models are standard laptop size, although thickness may vary depending on age of model. If you have a thinner 7.5mm drive likely you'd need to include a packing spacer (normally supplied with a new drive - especially Crucial branded SSD). If the drive is 9.00mm the spacer is not required; but wise to keep safer nonetheless; as you may wish, one day, to put the drive into an external case and that case may require the packing out spacer...

message edited by trvlr



#1
July 26, 2016 at 06:40:49
As I understand it - If your friend has left his ownership details (aka ID in Apple land) active with regard to this Macbook then no way you can install or use the Macbook. Your friend has to in effect deregister the Mac from his details and then you can hopefully reregister as yours...

Apple is pretty strong on this aspect; and they will need confirmation from the previous owner that you are now the legit owner; and he (again) has to advise them that his ID is no-longer active/required etc.

However... these links discuss an approach one can take that apparently works:

https://discussions.apple.com/docs/...

http://apple.stackexchange.com/ques...

They're more or less the same info but in varying details; and with a link or three included (in the second link).

Incidentally I'd be inclined to go for el Capitan as it's considered by many to be better than Yosemite.


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#2
July 26, 2016 at 06:54:49
Oh thanks i will email him as maybe he is unaware. I presumed he knew the ins and outs of the mac world. Oh thanks i was wondering about El Capitan as i know its the latest. I guess this being an old macbook pro i thought it would be slow if the lates osx is on it?

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#3
July 26, 2016 at 10:34:07
If you dig around the Apple site, there is a list showing which models of Macs will be OK with el Capitan.

My Macbook Pro is a late 2010 model. It runs el Capitan fine. I would recommend loading yours with max RAM; logon to crucial.com to find out which of their sticks to use. If you can get the Mac to boot up to a desktop, and thus run safari (Apple's default browser) you can then elect to have crucial scan the system and make their recommendations re' various upgrades - SSD included.

So perhaps also consider an SSD to replace the standard hard drive; it will make a difference in the overall performance. Again crucial will suggest which. I'd then go check online (Amazon especially) for best price. Go for at least 500Gig, perhaps even larger?


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#4
July 27, 2016 at 01:13:00
Oh yes i have seen a page ages ago because i was searching to give advice for someone else.
Yes more ram i can see would be good as it is slow to boot.
Oh thanks i am thinking to give this machine to another person that really needs it so will give them the advice about the hard drive.

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#5
July 27, 2016 at 02:39:13
http://www.apple.com/uk/osx/how-to-...

http://tinyurl.com/onav5sg

are essentially giving the same info re' which models etc.; but with other info too...

The links I proffered earlier may be useful in rebuilding the system - whether or not your friend gets involved in the process (removing his ID for the Macbook with Apple-land) though I would still encourage him to remove his ID association regardless. It will make rebuilding and installing software much easier.; as otherwise you or anyone else can only use some of the system as is; and not upgrade etc... (if I interpret correctly the info in the earlier links).

The slightly older Macbooks have the benefits of: a CD/DVD drive, access to RAM slots (one can thus upgrade), and similarly replace/upgrade the hard drive. Current models are in effect sealed - there is no end-user upgrade option; and of course no CD/DVD unit. A good reason to keep them going as long as possible.


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#6
July 27, 2016 at 05:12:20
OK found out my mac is this one http://www.everymac.com/systems/app...
Havent heard from the friend yet. I know he was moving house so maybe thats why.
Yes I want to get the max use out of any hardware :)

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#7
July 27, 2016 at 07:23:15
Similar to mine; and it ought to run el Capitan no problems. But upgrade RAM at least; and ensure you have enuff space on the hard drive for the OS and apps etc - and some file storage. 320Gig is OK - I'd prefer at least 500Gig - if not 750Gig or 1Tb - preferably SSD of course (price differentials are not that great). But also - as per any computer - ensure you regularly duplicate/copy/safeguard critical data off the system...; in-case of any problems anon...

Incidentally amend my RAM numbers in above posts. I was forgetting mine (as does yours...?) came with 4Gig installed by default; and I upgraded mine to 16Gig when I went over to Mavericks and then el Capitan. Brain had gone back to my olde (and still running XP-Pro) Acer 1692wlmi specs... More RAM at least means better performance; and SSD likewise (certainly boots faster and reduced battery drain too...).


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#8
July 28, 2016 at 01:06:45
Cool thanks. Still havent heard from the person i got the mac from.
Oh wow i didnt know i cud put in that much ram. Sounds good. I guess replacing the hard drive would get rid of the problem of the former owner...i have never pulled an ssd out of a machine before. Oh now i remember he was gunna contact me when he had some other hard drives. They looked like they were 3.5" though. He said he had to wipe them first. Maybe he is just too busy to look at phone or emails. Ah well sounds like i am best of waiting

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#9
July 28, 2016 at 01:19:36
✔ Best Answer
Specs for a Macbook Pro

https://support.apple.com/kb/sp583?...

I was correct first time.. The max RAM for a Macbook Pron is 8Gig - not 16Gig...

The Mac Mini is max RAM of 16Gig.

Hard drives in both models are standard laptop size, although thickness may vary depending on age of model. If you have a thinner 7.5mm drive likely you'd need to include a packing spacer (normally supplied with a new drive - especially Crucial branded SSD). If the drive is 9.00mm the spacer is not required; but wise to keep safer nonetheless; as you may wish, one day, to put the drive into an external case and that case may require the packing out spacer...

message edited by trvlr


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#10
July 28, 2016 at 01:24:32
Ah cool thanks :)

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#11
July 28, 2016 at 01:37:51
Just to clarify... I was referring to hard drive models in my last post, not Macs. Laptop drives come in the two thicknesess; and SSD usually are the thinner regardless these days. Either thickness will fit wherever (spacer used as required).

Macs will also run Windows; via Bootcamp (Apple's boot manager and free) in a dual boot arrangement; or Parallels (creates virtual machine for the Windows to run within Mac OS.

You can also run Linux the same way - Mac and Linux dual boot or Linux in a VM via Parallels.

In Parallel VM you can share data between the two OS; in Bootcamp/dual boot it's one OS at a time, thus no access to Mac OS files.


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#12
July 28, 2016 at 01:45:57
Oh yes i understoof about the hard drives thanks.
Yes thanks i understand about the OS's.
Yes i am primarily a linux user on my desktop :)
Yes dabbled with dual booting years back...i hope that is easier these days as was problematic years back...or maybe me he he. Not enough knowledge back then

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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