Solved Linux to use for Toshiba Satellite A100

Gateway / Mx6436
March 10, 2015 at 12:00:52
Specs: XP SP3, 3Ghz, 4GB Ram
I have a Toshiba Satellite A100 (1.7Ghz duo core, 1GB of memory) kicking around that isn't good for anything and was wondering how Linux works when it comes to naming files.

I am still working with the frustrations of categorizing files and folders using Windows XP and how it will automatically rename files and folders once a certain amount of characters have been reached. Is Linux more forgiving when it comes to this glitch? I understand that Linux, or I should say some Linux, distributions work with OpenOffice so I am wondering which distributions work this laptop.

Another possibility would be if there is a recommended Virtual Machine that will allow me to run a Linux Distro on a different computer running at 2.4Ghz with 4GB memory on a Windows XP SP3 machine for a workaround to have one less computer on.

I don't know what it is about Linux distros and why I haven't been able to load one successfully onto one of my old computers hard drives. I can usually get live distros to load, but to get distros to load onto a hard drive why do I need to know commands, it should just load automatically, seriously!


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✔ Best Answer
March 10, 2015 at 16:50:26
Linux limitations are similar depending on the disk formatting:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compar...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filena...

Anyhow, installing Linux is relatively easy. 1st you'll need to decide on a distro that will work with your hardware. Being that you only have 1GB RAM, you should stick with distros with a lightweight desktop environment such as LXDE or Xfce. Once you've decided, download the ISO, burn it to a CD or DVD using the appropriate software (e.g. ImgBurn), then boot off the disk. You can either start the installation immediately, or boot into Linux & start the install from within live session. There's usually a shortcut on the desktop or somewhere in the start menu.

I'm currently running Zorin OS 9 Lite on 10+ yr old HP laptop with an AMD A64 3200+ & 1.25GB RAM.

http://zorin-os.com/tour.html

message edited by riider



#1
March 10, 2015 at 12:19:39
Just curious. I never had that issue about file renaming files on XP. Are they really long file names? I had more trouble with Windows 7 onwards which sort files automatically, rather than in XP when it only does so on refresh or when you go back to them.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
March 10, 2015 at 12:47:40
I am counting the amount of characters in the names of these files and as far as I can tell they only add up to about 200-225 characters, short of the max 260 characters allowed for files. This includes the drive it is on, and all folders until it has reached the file. It is not so much that they are long as I have cut pasted folders to rename them then to place them back with their shortened names, but they are organized so that files are under certain categories where I would be able to search them easily browsing folders and not using the "search" main folder function.

How is Windows 8 with naming files?

Last attempt, and this is about my third attempt in 7 years, I remember downloaded Mint and not being able to load it because I couldn't figure out the commands or it just wouldn't load on my IBM T41, or which I have disposed of.

Ultimately having it on my main computer that runs XP would be best. Having another computer running for occasional use is not to thrilling a thought. From what I can see Linux distros aren't compatible with each other when it comes to choosing applications to install. And of course learning a new operating system could be more trouble than help.

Which distro would you recommend?

message edited by sluytman


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#3
March 10, 2015 at 13:00:01
"How is Windows 8 with naming files"

They've been OK with me (although that might not mean much as I didn't have any issues with XP either. Win 8 still has that auto-sort which is OK if you don't do a lot of file/folder sorting - then it can be a confounded nuisance (to me anyway). However I have a stand alone file manager for use when I'm doing a stack of renaming - that has an option to turn off auto-sort.

I'm not really a Linux person but I have always thought installing it to a HD was pretty well an automatic process, provided you use one which is intended to be installed. It's after that when deeper (or perhaps I should say "different") knowledge is required.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#4
March 10, 2015 at 13:23:32
I have heard that Linux distros are specifically designed to work with different systems but when looking at the computer requirements it usually will say "any intel/ amd", so I think that it is more "download and discover for yourself" of which can be quite time consuming. I wanted to say frustrating but if it didn't work the first two times it won't work.

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#5
March 10, 2015 at 13:38:29
Maybe - I'll leave you to the Linux brigade on that. Good hunting.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#6
March 10, 2015 at 16:50:26
✔ Best Answer
Linux limitations are similar depending on the disk formatting:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compar...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filena...

Anyhow, installing Linux is relatively easy. 1st you'll need to decide on a distro that will work with your hardware. Being that you only have 1GB RAM, you should stick with distros with a lightweight desktop environment such as LXDE or Xfce. Once you've decided, download the ISO, burn it to a CD or DVD using the appropriate software (e.g. ImgBurn), then boot off the disk. You can either start the installation immediately, or boot into Linux & start the install from within live session. There's usually a shortcut on the desktop or somewhere in the start menu.

I'm currently running Zorin OS 9 Lite on 10+ yr old HP laptop with an AMD A64 3200+ & 1.25GB RAM.

http://zorin-os.com/tour.html

message edited by riider


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#7
March 10, 2015 at 18:30:40
Interesting wiki link posted.

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#8
March 17, 2015 at 12:27:03
Unfortunately Zorin does not work. When attempting to load it onto the computer I get a "EDD: Error 8000 reading sector 484423"(new line)"Boot:" prompt, making me 0 for ∞ when trying install Linux.

Xubuntu 14.04 seems to load onto this machine

message edited by sluytman


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