Best Linux for servers?

March 21, 2012 at 05:45:12
Specs: Windows 7
I got a server currently using windows 7, but i want to use the license on a other pc.
So i was thinking to install linux on the server.
Got a few questions regarding that.
1. Can i expect any trouble when using a Linux server with windows 7 workstations?
2. What Linux would be the best choice for this?

The server is being used for internal backups, and in the future some web applications.


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#1
March 21, 2012 at 07:20:58
If you ask 10 people, you will get 10 answers as to which Linux is best. I would probably use FreeBSD which is Unix, not Linux but that's another story. Any of them should work for backups. What web applications do you want to run?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
March 21, 2012 at 07:35:15
The web application is a appointment system, which uses the same database as the current windows application.
So it's a website which connects to a sql database for data storage.
And i am hoping to run the mysql on that same server also.
Since Mysql supports linux it should not be a problem.

I have used Linux before, but like you said there can be 10 different answers.
So i did use a lot of different ones also.
Though never on a server.


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#3
March 21, 2012 at 09:43:18
+1 for FreeBSD. It's the most stable of the common free operating systems and is an excellent platform to run web servers and database servers. An additional advantage is that you can use the ZFS file system.

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#4
March 21, 2012 at 12:24:01
I am going to install FreeBSD do some testing on it.
Thanks for your opinions.

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#5
March 21, 2012 at 16:02:44
I think I'd also keep an open mind to a few other choices. Opensuse, and any of the Red Hat clones come to my mind. Openindiana may even work.

There are some pre-made distros like freenas and openfiler that also may suit your needs.

In any case it may be best to stick with one rather than jump around later.

As guapo states, there is not any one of us that would fully agree to what may be best. Best may be a combination of hardware support, software support and technical ability.

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#6
March 21, 2012 at 16:12:02
Yeah i understand, i personally used opensuse and redhat alot.
But as said, never as a server.
FreeBSD i never really tried, but i am going to give it a try.
Got a few days to test, so i can try a few.
And stick to whatever i like most.

Was installing FreeBSD a few minutes ago.
But ran into a problem, for some reason its not picking a boot device.


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#7
March 22, 2012 at 12:42:32
FreeBSD is a bit technical as well as kind of a unique naming scheme. Some of the linux distro's are now starting to adopt that or a similar naming scheme to help admins more fully decide what they are doing.

So the question is it a naming deal, an issue with understanding the installer or some driver issue?

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#8
March 22, 2012 at 13:53:36
I think its a driver issue i got with FreeBSD.
For some reason it keeps throwing error 19 at me when trying to boot for installing it.

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#9
March 22, 2012 at 17:21:43
I assume you mean it is a grub error 19.

Did you try some odd install like to a usb flash drive?

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#10
March 23, 2012 at 02:12:13
Yeah i tried everything, USB Stick image, CD image, Dvd Image.
It's all the same, 1 time i managed to get it installed through the USB stick.
But it ended up installing it on the USB Stick for some reason.

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#11
March 23, 2012 at 12:46:49
You have remains of the OS all over then. Your bios and the boot loader and usb all need to be on the same page. Not sure which way to go now. Delete all partitions and try one single disk install.


Linux has always had one problem. The install asks you to read what it is doing. You and I tend not to read or fully understand what we see. Be sure you read what is going on next install.

It is also possible that the disk you are using or some hardware is bad.

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#12
March 23, 2012 at 14:42:01
That's what i thought also, but the 2 hard drives in use are brand new.
Never had a OS installed on them, even disconnected one of them to check if it was that.

I think there is a driver issue somewhere


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#13
March 23, 2012 at 17:04:01
Could be but normally if you use the install program and it says it see's a hard drive, then you don't need a driver.

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#14
March 24, 2012 at 03:34:15
Yeah that's the weird part about it.
I gonna test it on a different PC setup this week.
See if it works on that one.

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#15
March 24, 2012 at 05:04:03
Here is something on it:

http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.IS...

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#16
March 24, 2012 at 05:20:33
Do you have RAID on your server by any chance?

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#17
March 24, 2012 at 07:13:22
They are supposed to be set as raid, but i set them as non raid to test if that was causing it.

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#18
March 24, 2012 at 15:35:24
The issue is that the install program should have either reported correctly what you wanted to load to. It should have correctly asked you where to put the loader and so forth.

Since you haven't said, "I can't find any drive during the install program" then I can assume that the OS does support the drive and controller. The end is that you may still have bios settings wrong or some left over part of grub or you didn't follow the installation correctly. Mean ain't I?

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#19
March 24, 2012 at 16:51:48
Haha well its possible, i am no pro with FreeBSD so could be.

Gonna do a full bios reset, see if that does anything.


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#20
March 24, 2012 at 23:52:55
FreeBSD works well with most proper hardware RAID controllers (those on separate cards) but you may have problems with the RAID controllers built in to motherboards. In that case it's probably better to disable the on-board RAID and use software RAID. (For example, ZFS handles RAID in software very well.)

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