3GS and skin cases

July 25, 2009 at 20:53:41
Specs: iPhone OS
I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
(not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?

Thanks in advance for some feedback.

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


See More: 3GS and skin cases

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#1
July 25, 2009 at 21:53:41
In article <h4ggfn$kuo$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
Salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:

> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
>
> Thanks in advance for some feedback.

I'm not convinced there *is* an overheating problem. I have plenty of
friends with the 3GS, and they all say theirs never gets very hot. And
I've recently read reports indicating the discoloration may actually be
due to pigments in silicon cases people use with the iPhone:

<http://www.insanely-great.com/news.php?id=10436>

At any rate, if you are looking for top-notch thin skin-like protection
from scratches and so on for your iPhone, look no further than Invisible
Shield. I've had it on every iPod and iPhone I have ever owned, and it's
simply AMAZING. It's made of the same stuff the military uses to protect
helicopter blades, and has a lifetime guarantee against scratches,
tears, or damage:

<http://invisibleshield.com>

Be sure to watch the scratch test video and other video demos (scroll
down on this page):

<http://preview.tinyurl.com/ktp27z>

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#2
July 25, 2009 at 22:53:41
Salgud wrote:
> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
>
> Thanks in advance for some feedback.

I have a 3G in a silicone case, using an app (OK game!) called Tap
Defens eats the battery so I assume this works the phone hard. Even
playing the game for an hour on a train last week the phone was still
only warm to the touch.

As it was in my hand I doubt the skin made that much difference and some
of that heat would have been as a result of me clutching the phone.
When using the ipod in a hip pocket it's never been notibly above
ambient temp.

Mike

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#3
July 25, 2009 at 23:53:41
On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 00:29:34 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:

> In article <h4ggfn$kuo$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
> Salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
>> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
>> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
>> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
>> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
>> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
>> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for some feedback.
>
> I'm not convinced there *is* an overheating problem. I have plenty of
> friends with the 3GS, and they all say theirs never gets very hot. And
> I've recently read reports indicating the discoloration may actually be
> due to pigments in silicon cases people use with the iPhone:
>
> <http://www.insanely-great.com/news.php?id=10436>
>
Would be nice if this it true, but hard to tell at this point


> At any rate, if you are looking for top-notch thin skin-like protection
> from scratches and so on for your iPhone, look no further than Invisible
> Shield. I've had it on every iPod and iPhone I have ever owned, and it's
> simply AMAZING. It's made of the same stuff the military uses to protect
> helicopter blades, and has a lifetime guarantee against scratches,
> tears, or damage:
>
> <http://invisibleshield.com>
>
> Be sure to watch the scratch test video and other video demos (scroll
> down on this page):
>
> <http://preview.tinyurl.com/ktp27z>

Actually, I already bought the invisible shield and it's on my bookcase
waiting for my iPhone. (Saw it on sale for half price so went ahead and
bought it.) That will protect from scratches. I also want to protect it
from being dropped, since I'm so clumsey. Hence, the silcon case.

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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Related Solutions

#4
July 26, 2009 at 00:53:41
On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 09:34:47 +0100, Mike wrote:

> Salgud wrote:
>> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
>> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
>> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
>> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
>> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
>> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
>> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for some feedback.
>
> I have a 3G in a silicone case, using an app (OK game!) called Tap
> Defens eats the battery so I assume this works the phone hard. Even
> playing the game for an hour on a train last week the phone was still
> only warm to the touch.
>
> As it was in my hand I doubt the skin made that much difference and some
> of that heat would have been as a result of me clutching the phone.
> When using the ipod in a hip pocket it's never been notibly above
> ambient temp.
>
> Mike

Thanks for your reply. But the 3G runs at 412 MHz, the 3GS at 600. Lots
more heat.

Anyone have any experience with a silicon case on a 3GS?

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#5
July 26, 2009 at 01:53:41
On Mon, 27 Jul 2009 19:51:07 +0100, Mike wrote:

> salgud wrote:
>> On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 09:34:47 +0100, Mike wrote:
>>
>>> Salgud wrote:
>>>> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
>>>> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
>>>> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
>>>> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
>>>> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
>>>> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
>>>> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks in advance for some feedback.
>>> I have a 3G in a silicone case, using an app (OK game!) called Tap
>>> Defens eats the battery so I assume this works the phone hard. Even
>>> playing the game for an hour on a train last week the phone was still
>>> only warm to the touch.
>>>
>>> As it was in my hand I doubt the skin made that much difference and some
>>> of that heat would have been as a result of me clutching the phone.
>>> When using the ipod in a hip pocket it's never been notibly above
>>> ambient temp.
>>>
>>> Mike
>>
>> Thanks for your reply. But the 3G runs at 412 MHz, the 3GS at 600. Lots
>> more heat.
>>
>> Anyone have any experience with a silicon case on a 3GS?
>
> True more power but that doesn't necessarily mean more heat. A silicone
> case will reduce heat dissipation, I have some silicon oven gloves that
> keep it out very effectively but they are thicker than the silicon skin.
>
> As the most intensive apps require you to hold the iphone how much EXTRA
> heat will it retain? I would suggest the difference made by the skin
> will be marginal. When the phone is in your pocket, either playing
> music or waiting for a call I doubt there will be a heat problem.
>
> Mike

I should dig out my old CRC manual and calculate the heat retention, but
it's a complex, recursive calculation that I, and others, struggled with in
engineering school a lifetime ago(only about 10% of us, at a good
engineering school, completed it sucessfully). Still, a good insulator,
like silicon, could retain significantly more heat that a bare iPhone. If
there is, in fact, a problem with iPhones overheating, it certainly
wouldn't help.

I guess I'll probably hold off on the case and see how hot the phone gets
in my hand in heavy use. If it gets pretty hot, I'll look at other options.
If not, I'll go ahead and get the silicon skin case. And I'll keep
following the overheating issue to see if they come to any resolution.

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#6
July 26, 2009 at 02:53:41
IDIOT. PLEASE FIX YOUR BROKEN QUOTING (see below)!

...or you know what? Maybe I'll just go ahead and kill all your posts
and be done with it.

In article <00b522df$0$13143$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com>,
John Doe <jdoe@usenetlove.invalid> wrote:

> Mike <mikeloveschampagneandrugby googlemail.com> wrote:
>
> > salgud wrote:
>
> >> I should dig out my old CRC manual and calculate the heat
> >> retention, but it's a complex, recursive calculation that I,
> >> and others, struggled with in engineering school a lifetime
> >> ago(only about 10% of us, at a good engineering school,
> >> completed it sucessfully). Still, a good insulator, like
> >> silicon, could retain significantly more heat that a bare
> >> iPhone. If there is, in fact, a problem with iPhones
> >> overheating, it certainly wouldn't help.
> >>
> >> I guess I'll probably hold off on the case and see how hot the
> >> phone gets in my hand in heavy use. If it gets pretty hot, I'll
> >> look at other options.
>
> >> If not, I'll go ahead and get the silicon skin case. And I'll
> >> keep following the overheating issue to see if they come to any
> >> resolution.
> >
> > Any calcs will be skewed by the phone being in your hand! TBH a
> > silicon case is cheap, buy one and try it, if it feels too hot,
> > chuck it.
> >
> > In reality the iphone is not slick to hold, it's shiny
> > appearance makes people think it might slip out of their hand
> > but in reality it's no more likely to do so
>
> A slippery appearance has little to do with it. Whether the iPhone
> is likely to slip out of someone's hand, and whether it will be
> damaged on impact with the ground, depends on the individual
> circumstance. I take it while street skating, a protective case is
> a no-brainer.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > It is awfully pretty and I want to keep it that way!
> >
> > Mike
> >
> >
> > Path:
> > news.astraweb.com!border1.newsrouter.astraweb.com!news.glorb.com!news2.glorb
> > .com!feeder.eternal-september.org!eternal-september.org!not-for-mail
> > From: Mike <mikeloveschampagneandrugby googlemail.com>
> > Newsgroups: misc.phone.mobile.iphone
> > Subject: Re: 3GS and skin cases
> > Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2009 20:49:16 +0100
> > Organization: A noiseless patient Spider
> > Lines: 64
> > Message-ID: <h4l0os$rfh$2 news.eternal-september.org>
> > References: <h4ggfn$kuo$1 news.eternal-september.org> <h4h4s4$qf3$1
> > news.eternal-september.org> <2nmtseqlf9v.umvdtxqn7aiv$.dlg 40tude.net>
> > <h4ktbt$5eg$1 news.eternal-september.org> <udiuurc242hf.lwyovn1u68zz$.dlg
> > 40tude.net>
> > Mime-Version: 1.0
> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
> > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> > X-Trace: news.eternal-september.org
> > U2FsdGVkX18BipJEUVCFRYckWjRyZc3sLr191hdre0r1ikImPwRkv7FD3J3AimEW+c98b2J5layM
> > OgqqvWWokV8KGVuYr951NI/AR33Ldy7LuES6WrZxUGjf1Ps1okrD3AhhOdCxQ7JH2K1xyqoAWrpg
> > NtsaTtDtn0A/7yQfPv4=
> > X-Complaints-To: abuse eternal-september.org
> > NNTP-Posting-Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2009 19:56:13 +0000 (UTC)
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> > X-Auth-Sender:
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> > 9mrfLO8keg==
> > Cancel-Lock: sha1:O9eS2zSo9VMPrYQ0R3VC265NBtw=
> > User-Agent: Thunderbird 2.0.0.22 (Windows/20090605)
> >

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#7
July 26, 2009 at 03:53:41
In article <11jgr89aa0pd7$.1g0o4ybys9jw2$.dlg@40tude.net>,
salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:

> On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 00:29:34 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:
>
> > In article <h4ggfn$kuo$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
> > Salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
> >
> >> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
> >> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
> >> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
> >> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
> >> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
> >> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
> >> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
> >>
> >> Thanks in advance for some feedback.
> >
> > I'm not convinced there *is* an overheating problem. I have plenty of
> > friends with the 3GS, and they all say theirs never gets very hot. And
> > I've recently read reports indicating the discoloration may actually be
> > due to pigments in silicon cases people use with the iPhone:
> >
> > <http://www.insanely-great.com/news.php?id=10436>
> >
> Would be nice if this it true, but hard to tell at this point

Well, as I have said before, I have plenty of friends who own iPhone
3GSs, and they all tell me there *is *no* heat issue at all - yes, even
under heavy use.

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#8
July 26, 2009 at 04:53:41
salgud wrote:
> On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 09:34:47 +0100, Mike wrote:
>
>> Salgud wrote:
>>> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
>>> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
>>> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
>>> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
>>> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
>>> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
>>> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
>>>
>>> Thanks in advance for some feedback.
>> I have a 3G in a silicone case, using an app (OK game!) called Tap
>> Defens eats the battery so I assume this works the phone hard. Even
>> playing the game for an hour on a train last week the phone was still
>> only warm to the touch.
>>
>> As it was in my hand I doubt the skin made that much difference and some
>> of that heat would have been as a result of me clutching the phone.
>> When using the ipod in a hip pocket it's never been notibly above
>> ambient temp.
>>
>> Mike
>
> Thanks for your reply. But the 3G runs at 412 MHz, the 3GS at 600. Lots
> more heat.
>
> Anyone have any experience with a silicon case on a 3GS?

True more power but that doesn't necessarily mean more heat. A silicone
case will reduce heat dissipation, I have some silicon oven gloves that
keep it out very effectively but they are thicker than the silicon skin.

As the most intensive apps require you to hold the iphone how much EXTRA
heat will it retain? I would suggest the difference made by the skin
will be marginal. When the phone is in your pocket, either playing
music or waiting for a call I doubt there will be a heat problem.

Mike

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#9
July 26, 2009 at 05:53:41
salgud wrote:
> On Mon, 27 Jul 2009 19:51:07 +0100, Mike wrote:
>
>> salgud wrote:
>>> On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 09:34:47 +0100, Mike wrote:
>>>
>>>> Salgud wrote:
>>>>> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
>>>>> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
>>>>> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
>>>>> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
>>>>> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
>>>>> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
>>>>> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks in advance for some feedback.
>>>> I have a 3G in a silicone case, using an app (OK game!) called Tap
>>>> Defens eats the battery so I assume this works the phone hard. Even
>>>> playing the game for an hour on a train last week the phone was still
>>>> only warm to the touch.
>>>>
>>>> As it was in my hand I doubt the skin made that much difference and some
>>>> of that heat would have been as a result of me clutching the phone.
>>>> When using the ipod in a hip pocket it's never been notibly above
>>>> ambient temp.
>>>>
>>>> Mike
>>> Thanks for your reply. But the 3G runs at 412 MHz, the 3GS at 600. Lots
>>> more heat.
>>>
>>> Anyone have any experience with a silicon case on a 3GS?
>> True more power but that doesn't necessarily mean more heat. A silicone
>> case will reduce heat dissipation, I have some silicon oven gloves that
>> keep it out very effectively but they are thicker than the silicon skin.
>>
>> As the most intensive apps require you to hold the iphone how much EXTRA
>> heat will it retain? I would suggest the difference made by the skin
>> will be marginal. When the phone is in your pocket, either playing
>> music or waiting for a call I doubt there will be a heat problem.
>>
>> Mike
>
> I should dig out my old CRC manual and calculate the heat retention, but
> it's a complex, recursive calculation that I, and others, struggled with in
> engineering school a lifetime ago(only about 10% of us, at a good
> engineering school, completed it sucessfully). Still, a good insulator,
> like silicon, could retain significantly more heat that a bare iPhone. If
> there is, in fact, a problem with iPhones overheating, it certainly
> wouldn't help.
>
> I guess I'll probably hold off on the case and see how hot the phone gets
> in my hand in heavy use. If it gets pretty hot, I'll look at other options.
> If not, I'll go ahead and get the silicon skin case. And I'll keep
> following the overheating issue to see if they come to any resolution.

Any calcs will be skewed by the phone being in your hand! TBH a silicon
case is cheap, buy one and try it, if it feels too hot, chuck it.

In reality the iphone is not slick to hold, it's shiny appearance makes
people think it might slip out of their hand but in reality it's no more
likely to do so than any of the twenty odd mobiles I've owned. It is
awfully pretty and I want to keep it that way!

Mike

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#10
July 26, 2009 at 06:53:41
Mike <mikeloveschampagneandrugby googlemail.com> wrote:

> salgud wrote:

>> I should dig out my old CRC manual and calculate the heat
>> retention, but it's a complex, recursive calculation that I,
>> and others, struggled with in engineering school a lifetime
>> ago(only about 10% of us, at a good engineering school,
>> completed it sucessfully). Still, a good insulator, like
>> silicon, could retain significantly more heat that a bare
>> iPhone. If there is, in fact, a problem with iPhones
>> overheating, it certainly wouldn't help.
>>
>> I guess I'll probably hold off on the case and see how hot the
>> phone gets in my hand in heavy use. If it gets pretty hot, I'll
>> look at other options.

>> If not, I'll go ahead and get the silicon skin case. And I'll
>> keep following the overheating issue to see if they come to any
>> resolution.
>
> Any calcs will be skewed by the phone being in your hand! TBH a
> silicon case is cheap, buy one and try it, if it feels too hot,
> chuck it.
>
> In reality the iphone is not slick to hold, it's shiny
> appearance makes people think it might slip out of their hand
> but in reality it's no more likely to do so

A slippery appearance has little to do with it. Whether the iPhone
is likely to slip out of someone's hand, and whether it will be
damaged on impact with the ground, depends on the individual
circumstance. I take it while street skating, a protective case is
a no-brainer.


> It is awfully pretty and I want to keep it that way!
>
> Mike
>
>
> Path: news.astraweb.com!border1.newsrouter.astraweb.com!news.glorb.com!news2.glorb.com!feeder.eternal-september.org!eternal-september.org!not-for-mail
> From: Mike <mikeloveschampagneandrugby googlemail.com>
> Newsgroups: misc.phone.mobile.iphone
> Subject: Re: 3GS and skin cases
> Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2009 20:49:16 +0100
> Organization: A noiseless patient Spider
> Lines: 64
> Message-ID: <h4l0os$rfh$2 news.eternal-september.org>
> References: <h4ggfn$kuo$1 news.eternal-september.org> <h4h4s4$qf3$1 news.eternal-september.org> <2nmtseqlf9v.umvdtxqn7aiv$.dlg 40tude.net> <h4ktbt$5eg$1 news.eternal-september.org> <udiuurc242hf.lwyovn1u68zz$.dlg 40tude.net>
> Mime-Version: 1.0
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
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> X-Complaints-To: abuse eternal-september.org
> NNTP-Posting-Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2009 19:56:13 +0000 (UTC)
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> Cancel-Lock: sha1:O9eS2zSo9VMPrYQ0R3VC265NBtw=
> User-Agent: Thunderbird 2.0.0.22 (Windows/20090605)
>

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#11
July 26, 2009 at 07:53:41
On Mon, 27 Jul 2009 16:52:16 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:

> In article <11jgr89aa0pd7$.1g0o4ybys9jw2$.dlg@40tude.net>,
> salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 00:29:34 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:
>>
>>> In article <h4ggfn$kuo$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
>>> Salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
>>>> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
>>>> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
>>>> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
>>>> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
>>>> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
>>>> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks in advance for some feedback.
>>>
>>> I'm not convinced there *is* an overheating problem. I have plenty of
>>> friends with the 3GS, and they all say theirs never gets very hot. And
>>> I've recently read reports indicating the discoloration may actually be
>>> due to pigments in silicon cases people use with the iPhone:
>>>
>>> <http://www.insanely-great.com/news.php?id=10436>
>>>
>> Would be nice if this it true, but hard to tell at this point
>
> Well, as I have said before, I have plenty of friends who own iPhone
> 3GSs, and they all tell me there *is *no* heat issue at all - yes, even
> under heavy use.

I've read enough on it now to believe the problem does exist. My guess is
that it's some kind of rare defect, since it doesn't happen that often but
seems to be severe when it does. (Of course, the ManiMacs will say it never
happened, just people making it up. But I've seen enough credible accounts
to believe them.) Hopefully, Apple will take care of those few who see it.
And hopefully, it won't happen to me.

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#12
July 26, 2009 at 08:53:41
In article <ffpyd1ymmzy5.m3nhct33w96$.dlg@40tude.net>,
salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:

> On Mon, 27 Jul 2009 16:52:16 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:
>
> > In article <11jgr89aa0pd7$.1g0o4ybys9jw2$.dlg@40tude.net>,
> > salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
> >
> >> On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 00:29:34 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:
> >>
> >>> In article <h4ggfn$kuo$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
> >>> Salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
> >>>> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
> >>>> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
> >>>> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
> >>>> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
> >>>> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
> >>>> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
> >>>>
> >>>> Thanks in advance for some feedback.
> >>>
> >>> I'm not convinced there *is* an overheating problem. I have plenty of
> >>> friends with the 3GS, and they all say theirs never gets very hot. And
> >>> I've recently read reports indicating the discoloration may actually be
> >>> due to pigments in silicon cases people use with the iPhone:
> >>>
> >>> <http://www.insanely-great.com/news.php?id=10436>
> >>>
> >> Would be nice if this it true, but hard to tell at this point
> >
> > Well, as I have said before, I have plenty of friends who own iPhone
> > 3GSs, and they all tell me there *is *no* heat issue at all - yes, even
> > under heavy use.
>
> I've read enough on it now to believe the problem does exist. My guess is
> that it's some kind of rare defect, since it doesn't happen that often but
> seems to be severe when it does. (Of course, the ManiMacs will say it never
> happened, just people making it up. But I've seen enough credible accounts
> to believe them.) Hopefully, Apple will take care of those few who see it.
> And hopefully, it won't happen to me.

Which credible accounts would those be? And how many, exactly? History
has shown that a vocal minority can make something quite rare and small
seem a whole lot bigger than it is - especially on the internet.

Nine times out of ten defective batteries cause the type of blistering
heat being described. And defective batteries aren't model-specific -
any phone or device is susceptible. So I still don't believe there is an
"iPhone 3GS overheating problem".

--
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Report •

#13
July 26, 2009 at 09:53:41
On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 10:58:07 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:

> In article <ffpyd1ymmzy5.m3nhct33w96$.dlg@40tude.net>,
> salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 27 Jul 2009 16:52:16 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:
>>
>>> In article <11jgr89aa0pd7$.1g0o4ybys9jw2$.dlg@40tude.net>,
>>> salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 00:29:34 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> In article <h4ggfn$kuo$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
>>>>> Salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about them,
>>>>>> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon skin
>>>>>> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
>>>>>> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
>>>>>> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
>>>>>> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
>>>>>> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thanks in advance for some feedback.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm not convinced there *is* an overheating problem. I have plenty of
>>>>> friends with the 3GS, and they all say theirs never gets very hot. And
>>>>> I've recently read reports indicating the discoloration may actually be
>>>>> due to pigments in silicon cases people use with the iPhone:
>>>>>
>>>>> <http://www.insanely-great.com/news.php?id=10436>
>>>>>
>>>> Would be nice if this it true, but hard to tell at this point
>>>
>>> Well, as I have said before, I have plenty of friends who own iPhone
>>> 3GSs, and they all tell me there *is *no* heat issue at all - yes, even
>>> under heavy use.
>>
>> I've read enough on it now to believe the problem does exist. My guess is
>> that it's some kind of rare defect, since it doesn't happen that often but
>> seems to be severe when it does. (Of course, the ManiMacs will say it never
>> happened, just people making it up. But I've seen enough credible accounts
>> to believe them.) Hopefully, Apple will take care of those few who see it.
>> And hopefully, it won't happen to me.
>
> Which credible accounts would those be? And how many, exactly? History
> has shown that a vocal minority can make something quite rare and small
> seem a whole lot bigger than it is - especially on the internet.
>
> Nine times out of ten defective batteries cause the type of blistering
> heat being described. And defective batteries aren't model-specific -
> any phone or device is susceptible. So I still don't believe there is an
> "iPhone 3GS overheating problem".

Of course not.

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#14
July 26, 2009 at 10:53:41
In article <vw2bgi91w6za$.1p3wb85cm7mcs$.dlg@40tude.net>,
salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:

> On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 10:58:07 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:
>
> > In article <ffpyd1ymmzy5.m3nhct33w96$.dlg@40tude.net>,
> > salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
> >
> >> On Mon, 27 Jul 2009 16:52:16 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:
> >>
> >>> In article <11jgr89aa0pd7$.1g0o4ybys9jw2$.dlg@40tude.net>,
> >>> salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 00:29:34 -0500, Jolly Roger wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>> In article <h4ggfn$kuo$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
> >>>>> Salgud <spamboy6547@comcast.net> wrote:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> I'm about to buy an iPhone and have been doing some reading about
> >>>>>> them,
> >>>>>> including about the overheating problem. I'm considering a silicon
> >>>>>> skin
> >>>>>> case to protect it. I know it's rare, but one person I read advised
> >>>>>> against using a silicon skin case because it could help the iPhone to
> >>>>>> over heat. Has anyone had direct experience with a 3GS with a silicon
> >>>>>> skin case? Have there been any problems that anyone knows of directly
> >>>>>> (not stories made up by the Apple-haters)?
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Thanks in advance for some feedback.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> I'm not convinced there *is* an overheating problem. I have plenty of
> >>>>> friends with the 3GS, and they all say theirs never gets very hot. And
> >>>>> I've recently read reports indicating the discoloration may actually be
> >>>>> due to pigments in silicon cases people use with the iPhone:
> >>>>>
> >>>>> <http://www.insanely-great.com/news.php?id=10436>
> >>>>>
> >>>> Would be nice if this it true, but hard to tell at this point
> >>>
> >>> Well, as I have said before, I have plenty of friends who own iPhone
> >>> 3GSs, and they all tell me there *is *no* heat issue at all - yes, even
> >>> under heavy use.
> >>
> >> I've read enough on it now to believe the problem does exist. My guess is
> >> that it's some kind of rare defect, since it doesn't happen that often but
> >> seems to be severe when it does. (Of course, the ManiMacs will say it
> >> never
> >> happened, just people making it up. But I've seen enough credible accounts
> >> to believe them.) Hopefully, Apple will take care of those few who see it.
> >> And hopefully, it won't happen to me.
> >
> > Which credible accounts would those be? And how many, exactly? History
> > has shown that a vocal minority can make something quite rare and small
> > seem a whole lot bigger than it is - especially on the internet.
> >
> > Nine times out of ten defective batteries cause the type of blistering
> > heat being described. And defective batteries aren't model-specific -
> > any phone or device is susceptible. So I still don't believe there is an
> > "iPhone 3GS overheating problem".
>
> Of course not.

Indeed.

--
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#15
July 26, 2009 at 11:53:41
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> So I still don't believe there is an "iPhone 3GS overheating
> problem".

Looks like you are making a strawman, as if anyone cares what you
believe.

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#16
July 26, 2009 at 12:53:41
On 28/07/09 11:58 AM, Jolly Roger wrote:
> Which credible accounts would those be? And how many, exactly? History
> has shown that a vocal minority can make something quite rare and small
> seem a whole lot bigger than it is - especially on the internet.
>
> Nine times out of ten defective batteries cause the type of blistering
> heat being described. And defective batteries aren't model-specific -
> any phone or device is susceptible. So I still don't believe there is an
> "iPhone 3GS overheating problem".

Ten times out of ten, it depends on the circumstances. I've heard some
people blame specific third-party apps. I've noticed that whenever I
turn connection tethering on my iPhone 3G it gets much hotter.

But getting back to the topic this thread was supposed to be for...
I tried invisibleSHIELD and took it off, because the material was too
sticky. With that exception and the insane installation process, I
thought is was great.

Nowadays, I generally don't use a case. If I'm going some place where I
know it will easily scratch, I use a silicon case that I can very easily
remove. And I use iKlear.
--
usenetsolon@gmail.com
Firefox 3.5 is out! <http://getfirefox.com/>

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#17
July 26, 2009 at 13:53:41
In article <UpqdnWYmjMlDjezXnZ2dnUVZ_jJi4p2d@giganews.com>,
Solon <usenetsolon@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 28/07/09 11:58 AM, Jolly Roger wrote:
> > Which credible accounts would those be? And how many, exactly? History
> > has shown that a vocal minority can make something quite rare and small
> > seem a whole lot bigger than it is - especially on the internet.
> >
> > Nine times out of ten defective batteries cause the type of blistering
> > heat being described. And defective batteries aren't model-specific -
> > any phone or device is susceptible. So I still don't believe there is an
> > "iPhone 3GS overheating problem".
>
> Ten times out of ten, it depends on the circumstances. I've heard some
> people blame specific third-party apps. I've noticed that whenever I
> turn connection tethering on my iPhone 3G it gets much hotter.

I have yet to find any real person who will tell me their iPhone 3GS
gets too hot to hold, and I know quite a lot of people with iPhone 3GSs.
Getting warm is something any cell phone will do under heavy use, but
that's not what this thread is about - it's about *over*heating.

> But getting back to the topic this thread was supposed to be for...
> I tried invisibleSHIELD and took it off, because the material was too
> sticky. With that exception and the insane installation process, I
> thought is was great.

Too sticky?! What are you talking about? Once it's on, it stays on, and
there isn't anything sticky about the outer surface. I've installed
InvisibleShield on several phones and iPods, and I can say from lots of
experience the installation process is tricky, but not insane or
impossible. Perhaps you installed it incorrectly.

> Nowadays, I generally don't use a case. If I'm going some place where I
> know it will easily scratch, I use a silicon case that I can very easily
> remove. And I use iKlear.

Neither of those are as effective against preventing scratches, IMO.

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

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#18
July 26, 2009 at 14:53:41
In article <8aSdnfTB_5X4hO_XnZ2dnUVZ_tmdnZ2d@giganews.com>, Solon
<usenetsolon@gmail.com> wrote:

> >> Ten times out of ten, it depends on the circumstances. I've heard some
> >> people blame specific third-party apps. I've noticed that whenever I
> >> turn connection tethering on my iPhone 3G it gets much hotter.
> >
> > I have yet to find any real person who will tell me their iPhone 3GS
> > gets too hot to hold, and I know quite a lot of people with iPhone 3GSs.
>
> If you actually think that just because none of your friends have
> experienced it, that means the problem does not exist, than we should
> just jump straight to comparing something to Hitler or the Nazis.

goodwin invoked.

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#19
July 26, 2009 at 15:53:41
On 30/07/09 9:56 AM, Jolly Roger wrote:
> In article<UpqdnWYmjMlDjezXnZ2dnUVZ_jJi4p2d@giganews.com>,
> Solon<usenetsolon@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Ten times out of ten, it depends on the circumstances. I've heard some
>> people blame specific third-party apps. I've noticed that whenever I
>> turn connection tethering on my iPhone 3G it gets much hotter.
>
> I have yet to find any real person who will tell me their iPhone 3GS
> gets too hot to hold, and I know quite a lot of people with iPhone 3GSs.

If you actually think that just because none of your friends have
experienced it, that means the problem does not exist, than we should
just jump straight to comparing something to Hitler or the Nazis.

--
usenetsolon@gmail.com
Firefox 3.5 is out! <http://getfirefox.com/>

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#20
July 26, 2009 at 16:53:41
In article <8aSdnfTB_5X4hO_XnZ2dnUVZ_tmdnZ2d@giganews.com>,
Solon <usenetsolon@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 30/07/09 9:56 AM, Jolly Roger wrote:
> > In article<UpqdnWYmjMlDjezXnZ2dnUVZ_jJi4p2d@giganews.com>,
> > Solon<usenetsolon@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Ten times out of ten, it depends on the circumstances. I've heard some
> >> people blame specific third-party apps. I've noticed that whenever I
> >> turn connection tethering on my iPhone 3G it gets much hotter.
> >
> > I have yet to find any real person who will tell me their iPhone 3GS
> > gets too hot to hold, and I know quite a lot of people with iPhone 3GSs.
>
> If you actually think that just because none of your friends have
> experienced it, that means the problem does not exist, than we should
> just jump straight to comparing something to Hitler or the Nazis.

It's certainly not a widespread problem, and again, the symptoms sound
more like a battery defect than anything to me.

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

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#21
July 26, 2009 at 17:53:41
On Thu, 30 Jul 2009 18:06:29 -0400, Solon <usenetsolon@gmail.com>
wrote:

>On 30/07/09 9:56 AM, Jolly Roger wrote:
>> In article<UpqdnWYmjMlDjezXnZ2dnUVZ_jJi4p2d@giganews.com>,
>> Solon<usenetsolon@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Ten times out of ten, it depends on the circumstances. I've heard some
>>> people blame specific third-party apps. I've noticed that whenever I
>>> turn connection tethering on my iPhone 3G it gets much hotter.
>>
>> I have yet to find any real person who will tell me their iPhone 3GS
>> gets too hot to hold, and I know quite a lot of people with iPhone 3GSs.
>
>If you actually think that just because none of your friends have
>experienced it, that means the problem does not exist, than we should
>just jump straight to comparing something to Hitler or the Nazis.

I had heard that the last thing that went through Hitler's mind
(besides the 9mm Parabellum bullet) was "Silicon or InvisiShield...?"

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Report •

#22
July 26, 2009 at 18:53:41
In article <jollyroger-A5BBF8.23312430072009@news.individual.net>,
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> > Why can't iphones operate over 95F?
>
> Probably because the components inside of them can generate significant
> heat during operation, and have no way to cool down much more than 95
> degrees would allow due to lack of air movement or conventional PC
> cooling methods. Common sense, really.

they work just fine in over 95 degree temperatures.

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#23
July 26, 2009 at 19:53:41
In article <8aSdnfTB_5X4hO_XnZ2dnUVZ_tmdnZ2d@giganews.com>,
Solon <usenetsolon@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 30/07/09 9:56 AM, Jolly Roger wrote:
> > In article<UpqdnWYmjMlDjezXnZ2dnUVZ_jJi4p2d@giganews.com>,
> > Solon<usenetsolon@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Ten times out of ten, it depends on the circumstances. I've heard some
> >> people blame specific third-party apps. I've noticed that whenever I
> >> turn connection tethering on my iPhone 3G it gets much hotter.
> >
> > I have yet to find any real person who will tell me their iPhone 3GS
> > gets too hot to hold, and I know quite a lot of people with iPhone 3GSs.
>
> If you actually think that just because none of your friends have
> experienced it, that means the problem does not exist, than we should
> just jump straight to comparing something to Hitler or the Nazis.

I never said that. But the implication that iPhone 3GS has a widespread
overheating problem is untrue based on my experience.

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
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JR

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#24
July 26, 2009 at 20:53:41
In article <Xns9C58E91DD5985noonehomecom@74.209.131.13>,
Larry <noone@home.com> wrote:

> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote in news:jollyroger-
> DD0B4C.19082030072009@news.individual.net:
>
> > It's certainly not a widespread problem, and again, the symptoms sound
> > more like a battery defect than anything to me.
>
> When Sony had a "few" laptops burn because there was "a battery defect",
> they did open research, admitted there was a problem, recalled all the bad
> batteries and fixed the problem for their customers very fast.

You seem to be under the impression that there are just as many iPhone
3GSs overheating as there were Sony batteries. Sony reportedly recalled
over *nine million* defective batteries:

<http://wbztv.com/consumer/technology/Sony.Battery.Recall.2.582384.html>

I don't see any indication that /nearly/ as many iPhones are having this
supposed overheating problem. A lot of the reports I have read about hot
iPhones mention that they were charging the battery at the time, which
is a good indication that the heat is battery-related.

> What is there about this concept that Apple doesn't seem to understand?
> I've not seen a single news article about what Apple is doing or what they
> have found except to blame the users for standing outside in July south of
> the 20th parallel where it's too hot for iPhones that don't have an
> overheating problem to operate.
>
> Why can't iphones operate over 95F?

Probably because the components inside of them can generate significant
heat during operation, and have no way to cool down much more than 95
degrees would allow due to lack of air movement or conventional PC
cooling methods. Common sense, really.

> Why not 160F in a hot car?

Probably for similar reasons you shouldn't store laptops in areas with
excessive heat. Again, common sense...

> How do you
> walk down the street in Phoenix talking on your iphone?
> http://www.wunderground.com/US/AZ/P...
> It barely gets below 95F until midnight! It'll be 110F all weekend! Will
> iPhones have to be turned off at the pool?

I think its safe to assume most cell phones will generally stay in a
pocket when not in active use. I am sure the temperature is
significantly cooler in the shade.

> I just can't understand why the temperature tolerance of it is SO
> LOW....unless there is a deep-hidden problem Apple knows about but can't or
> won't fix.

It doesn't seem all that low to me, to be honest. Again, all of the
people I know with iPhone 3GSs tell me theirs never get too hot to
handle.

> What happens if you leave an iPhone in Phoenix laying on a picnic table in
> the sun? Air temp 110F. How hot does it get inside, then?

I think you'd be pretty stupid to do something like that. I know *I*
wouldn't do it.

> Hope they don't sell any in the Middle East! Hell, it doesn't get blow 95
> in Arabia until NOVEMBER!

Should they not sell any laptops there as well then? Laptop temperature
requirements are significantly *lower* in general than iPhones.

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
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#25
July 26, 2009 at 21:53:41
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote in news:jollyroger-
41CFFC.08563630072009@news.individual.net:

> Once it's on, it stays on, and
> there isn't anything sticky about the outer surface.

Do these people also make a line of condoms? If so, what brand name!

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#26
July 26, 2009 at 22:53:41
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote in news:jollyroger-
DD0B4C.19082030072009@news.individual.net:

> It's certainly not a widespread problem, and again, the symptoms sound
> more like a battery defect than anything to me.
>
>

When Sony had a "few" laptops burn because there was "a battery defect",
they did open research, admitted there was a problem, recalled all the bad
batteries and fixed the problem for their customers very fast.

What is there about this concept that Apple doesn't seem to understand?
I've not seen a single news article about what Apple is doing or what they
have found except to blame the users for standing outside in July south of
the 20th parallel where it's too hot for iPhones that don't have an
overheating problem to operate.

Why can't iphones operate over 95F? Why not 160F in a hot car? How do you
walk down the street in Phoenix talking on your iphone?
http://www.wunderground.com/US/AZ/P...
It barely gets below 95F until midnight! It'll be 110F all weekend! Will
iPhones have to be turned off at the pool?

I just can't understand why the temperature tolerance of it is SO
LOW....unless there is a deep-hidden problem Apple knows about but can't or
won't fix.

What happens if you leave an iPhone in Phoenix laying on a picnic table in
the sun? Air temp 110F. How hot does it get inside, then?

Hope they don't sell any in the Middle East! Hell, it doesn't get blow 95
in Arabia until NOVEMBER!

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Report •

#27
July 26, 2009 at 23:53:41
In article <jollyroger-63E63C.09412031072009@news.individual.net>,
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> > they work just fine in over 95 degree temperatures.
>
> Probably not in *all* cases. There is a reason Apple states 95 degrees
> maximum as a requirement. At any rate, I doubt in most situations,
> operating temperatures actually reach that high. And when they actually
> do, a temperature warning would probably appear. Personally, I wouldn't
> be too concerned about it.

in the past couple of weeks, i've had the unfortunate opportunity of
being in over 100 degree temps in a couple of cities and had no
problems using my iphone or any other electronic device for that
matter. it really makes no sense, since the internals get much warmer
if i run certain apps, even when the air temp is lower.

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Report •

#28
July 27, 2009 at 00:53:41
In article <300720092149013085%nospam@nospam.invalid>,
nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <jollyroger-A5BBF8.23312430072009@news.individual.net>,
> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:
>
> > > Why can't iphones operate over 95F?
> >
> > Probably because the components inside of them can generate significant
> > heat during operation, and have no way to cool down much more than 95
> > degrees would allow due to lack of air movement or conventional PC
> > cooling methods. Common sense, really.
>
> they work just fine in over 95 degree temperatures.

Probably not in *all* cases. There is a reason Apple states 95 degrees
maximum as a requirement. At any rate, I doubt in most situations,
operating temperatures actually reach that high. And when they actually
do, a temperature warning would probably appear. Personally, I wouldn't
be too concerned about it.

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
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JR

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#29
July 27, 2009 at 01:53:41
In article <h4vl89$ill$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
Mike <mikeloveschampagneandrugby@googlemail.com> wrote:

> I find when it's in a pocket it doesn't get hot - at least no warmer
> than I am.

I carry mine on a waistband holster, and I live in the Phoenix, AZ area,
where it routinely gets about 110 daily. No problem with my iPhone
overheating. Maybe because it's a 3G and not a 3Gs.

--
Member National Rifle Association
Member American Civil Liberties Union
Member Human Rights Campaign

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#30
July 27, 2009 at 02:53:41
In article <Xns9C599256857CCnoonehomecom@74.209.131.13>, Larry
<noone@home.com> wrote:

> 95F isn't the temperature limit INSIDE the box. That's the outside air
> temp limit Apple doesn't want you to exceed. At 95F, the uncooled plastic
> boxes in the phone are probably 50 degrees warmer than that, maybe higher,
> like you say, on certain applications.

as i said, it works fine in warmer temperatures.

> Some applications even make them hot enough to turn the white cases to
> pink!

that's due to the iphone cases, not heat.

<http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/07/iphone-case-discoloration/>

...different pictures documenting iPhone discoloration reveal that the
markings are appearing in varying positions probably because there
are different cases causing the same problem. So much for the
overheating theory.

> Maybe Apple needs to load test the apps in the app store to find out
> what made some of them so hot. Heat problems may also be the reason for
> the stupid non-multitasking of iphone....excused away by the "battery
> life" excuse.

it multitasks.

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#31
July 27, 2009 at 03:53:41
In article <Xns9C59C949C3B9Anoonehomecom@74.209.131.13>, Larry
<noone@home.com> wrote:

> This may be the reason because your 3G runs at 400 Mhz, the 3GS is
> overclocked to 600 Mhz, generating much more heat from much more switching.

it's a different cpu.

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#32
July 27, 2009 at 04:53:41
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote in news:jollyroger-
A5BBF8.23312430072009@news.individual.net:

> Probably because the components inside of them can generate significant
> heat during operation, and have no way to cool down much more than 95
> degrees would allow due to lack of air movement or conventional PC
> cooling methods. Common sense, really.
>

It would have been SO easy to design it with the hot chips, (processors, RF
power amplifiers, etc.) pressed up against a heat transfer block to a metal
backplate to suck the heat away from the chips. At $600, its price without
the giveaways, there's plenty of per-unit money to spend a couple more
bucks on design than just to leave it cook.

Someone should do some heat research with a thermistor inside it to see how
hot the big guns get walking down a hot street. It must be quite
intolerable. You'd never run your expensive desktop in such a manner, why
your expensive portable. Even the netbooks all have extensive cooling.

Just doesn't seem proper and good engineering practice.

--
Larry

http://flightaware.com/analysis/all...
Each tiny red dot is an airliner in this Quicktime movie, ONE recent day of
air travel in the USA. What would happen if "they" found out this was the
real source of air pollution or cancer or why all the bugs around my
streetlight have disappeared? Would "they" tell us? Would "they" STOP
IT?!

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#33
July 27, 2009 at 05:53:41
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote in news:jollyroger-
A5BBF8.23312430072009@news.individual.net:

> I think its safe to assume most cell phones will generally stay in a
> pocket when not in active use. I am sure the temperature is
> significantly cooler in the shade.
>

There's a great idea! Take a little digital indoor/outdoor thermometer and
put the outdoor sensor up against the back of an iphone between your body
and the phone. Of course, in your pocket the phone isn't normally doing
much but monitoring the control channel of the cells and the email program.
Make it busy by running something CPU intensive like a big game in demo
mode to make it busy.

The added insulation of your clothes, like the inside pocket of a suit or
heavy jeans or even the insulated case it comes with, should make it quite
hot.

--
Larry

http://flightaware.com/analysis/all...
Each tiny red dot is an airliner in this Quicktime movie, ONE recent day of
air travel in the USA. What would happen if "they" found out this was the
real source of air pollution or cancer or why all the bugs around my
streetlight have disappeared? Would "they" tell us? Would "they" STOP
IT?!

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#34
July 27, 2009 at 06:53:41
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote in news:jollyroger-
A5BBF8.23312430072009@news.individual.net:

> Should they not sell any laptops there as well then? Laptop temperature
> requirements are significantly *lower* in general than iPhones.
>
>

"Mainstream Dell spec is 0 to 40 deg C"

That's Dell's design spec for operating laptops. That's 104F. Ten degrees
higher on much faster processors with a much bigger load.

--
Larry

http://flightaware.com/analysis/all...
Each tiny red dot is an airliner in this Quicktime movie, ONE recent day of
air travel in the USA. What would happen if "they" found out this was the
real source of air pollution or cancer or why all the bugs around my
streetlight have disappeared? Would "they" tell us? Would "they" STOP
IT?!

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#35
July 27, 2009 at 07:53:41
nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote in news:310720090746434811%
nospam@nospam.invalid:

> In article <jollyroger-63E63C.09412031072009@news.individual.net>,
> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:
>
>> > they work just fine in over 95 degree temperatures.
>>
>> Probably not in *all* cases. There is a reason Apple states 95 degrees
>> maximum as a requirement. At any rate, I doubt in most situations,
>> operating temperatures actually reach that high. And when they actually
>> do, a temperature warning would probably appear. Personally, I wouldn't
>> be too concerned about it.
>
> in the past couple of weeks, i've had the unfortunate opportunity of
> being in over 100 degree temps in a couple of cities and had no
> problems using my iphone or any other electronic device for that
> matter. it really makes no sense, since the internals get much warmer
> if i run certain apps, even when the air temp is lower.
>

95F isn't the temperature limit INSIDE the box. That's the outside air
temp limit Apple doesn't want you to exceed. At 95F, the uncooled plastic
boxes in the phone are probably 50 degrees warmer than that, maybe higher,
like you say, on certain applications.

Some applications even make them hot enough to turn the white cases to
pink! Maybe Apple needs to load test the apps in the app store to find out
what made some of them so hot. Heat problems may also be the reason for
the stupid non-multitasking of iphone....excused away by the "battery
life" excuse.

--
Larry

http://flightaware.com/analysis/all...
Each tiny red dot is an airliner in this Quicktime movie, ONE recent day of
air travel in the USA. What would happen if "they" found out this was the
real source of air pollution or cancer or why all the bugs around my
streetlight have disappeared? Would "they" tell us? Would "they" STOP
IT?!

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#36
July 27, 2009 at 08:53:41
In article <jollyroger-EBB25F.20312131072009@news.individual.net>,
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> In article <Xns9C5991B17F814noonehomecom@74.209.131.13>,
> Larry <noone@home.com> wrote:
>
> > "Mainstream Dell spec is 0 to 40 deg C"
> >
> > That's Dell's design spec for operating laptops. That's 104F. Ten degrees
> > higher on much faster processors with a much bigger load.
>
> Was there a point in there somewhere?
>
> You're sounding more and more like an Apple hater...

you must be new here:) larry goes out of his way to find things wrong
with anything apple, even if he completely fabricates it.

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#37
July 27, 2009 at 09:53:41
In article <jollyroger-EBB25F.20312131072009@news.individual.net>,
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> You're sounding more and more like an Apple hater...

More and more? Since when has it ever been less?

--
Member National Rifle Association
Member American Civil Liberties Union
Member Human Rights Campaign

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#38
July 27, 2009 at 10:53:41
In article <michelle-35CDFA.20094931072009@nothing.attdns.com>,
Michelle Steiner <michelle@michelle.org> wrote:

> > You're sounding more and more like an Apple hater...
>
> More and more? Since when has it ever been less?

before apple was founded.

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#39
July 27, 2009 at 11:53:41
In article <Xns9C599256857CCnoonehomecom@74.209.131.13>,
Larry <noone@home.com> wrote:

> Some applications even make them hot enough to turn the white cases to
> pink!

Nope. It's been shown that the iPhones that turned pink did so because
of the silicon cases wrapped around them, not because of heat.

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#40
July 27, 2009 at 12:53:41
In article <Xns9C5991B17F814noonehomecom@74.209.131.13>,
Larry <noone@home.com> wrote:

> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote in news:jollyroger-
> A5BBF8.23312430072009@news.individual.net:
>
> > Should they not sell any laptops there as well then? Laptop temperature
> > requirements are significantly *lower* in general than iPhones.
>
> "Mainstream Dell spec is 0 to 40 deg C"
>
> That's Dell's design spec for operating laptops. That's 104F. Ten degrees
> higher on much faster processors with a much bigger load.

Was there a point in there somewhere?

You're sounding more and more like an Apple hater...

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#41
July 27, 2009 at 13:53:41
In article <Xns9C5990DA4A5B0noonehomecom@74.209.131.13>,
Larry <noone@home.com> wrote:

> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote in news:jollyroger-
> A5BBF8.23312430072009@news.individual.net:
>
> > I think its safe to assume most cell phones will generally stay in a
> > pocket when not in active use. I am sure the temperature is
> > significantly cooler in the shade.
> >
>
> There's a great idea! Take a little digital indoor/outdoor thermometer and
> put the outdoor sensor up against the back of an iphone between your body
> and the phone. Of course, in your pocket the phone isn't normally doing
> much but monitoring the control channel of the cells and the email program.
> Make it busy by running something CPU intensive like a big game in demo
> mode to make it busy.
>
> The added insulation of your clothes, like the inside pocket of a suit or
> heavy jeans or even the insulated case it comes with, should make it quite
> hot.

Insulation can also carry heat *away*... You're not making much sense.

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#42
July 27, 2009 at 14:53:41
In article <Xns9C59C949C3B9Anoonehomecom@74.209.131.13>,
Larry <noone@home.com> wrote:

> Michelle Steiner <michelle@michelle.org> wrote in news:michelle-
> 127849.14341331072009@nothing.attdns.com:
>
> > Maybe because it's a 3G and not a 3Gs.
>
> This may be the reason because your 3G runs at 400 Mhz, the 3GS is
> overclocked to 600 Mhz, generating much more heat from much more switching.

...then again I know several people here in Austin Texas where the
temperature has been in excess of 102 degrees outside as of late, and
they all tell me theirs are doing just fine. None of them report any
excessive heat hat-so-ever.

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#43
July 27, 2009 at 15:53:41
In article <Xns9C59905333423noonehomecom@74.209.131.13>,
Larry <noone@home.com> wrote:

> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote in news:jollyroger-
> A5BBF8.23312430072009@news.individual.net:
>
> > Probably because the components inside of them can generate significant
> > heat during operation, and have no way to cool down much more than 95
> > degrees would allow due to lack of air movement or conventional PC
> > cooling methods. Common sense, really.
> >
>
> It would have been SO easy to design it with the hot chips, (processors, RF
> power amplifiers, etc.) pressed up against a heat transfer block to a metal
> backplate to suck the heat away from the chips. At $600, its price without
> the giveaways, there's plenty of per-unit money to spend a couple more
> bucks on design than just to leave it cook.
>
> Someone should do some heat research with a thermistor inside it to see how
> hot the big guns get walking down a hot street. It must be quite
> intolerable. You'd never run your expensive desktop in such a manner, why
> your expensive portable. Even the netbooks all have extensive cooling.
>
> Just doesn't seem proper and good engineering practice.

Frankly, it doesn't matter, because there isn't a problem with heat to
begin with.

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#44
July 27, 2009 at 16:53:41
In article <310720091852080316%nospam@nospam.invalid>,
nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <jollyroger-EBB25F.20312131072009@news.individual.net>,
> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:
>
> > In article <Xns9C5991B17F814noonehomecom@74.209.131.13>,
> > Larry <noone@home.com> wrote:
> >
> > > "Mainstream Dell spec is 0 to 40 deg C"
> > >
> > > That's Dell's design spec for operating laptops. That's 104F. Ten
> > > degrees
> > > higher on much faster processors with a much bigger load.
> >
> > Was there a point in there somewhere?
> >
> > You're sounding more and more like an Apple hater...
>
> you must be new here:)

Guilty as charged. : )

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#45
July 27, 2009 at 17:53:41
Larry wrote:
> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote in news:jollyroger-
> A5BBF8.23312430072009@news.individual.net:
>
>> I think its safe to assume most cell phones will generally stay in a
>> pocket when not in active use. I am sure the temperature is
>> significantly cooler in the shade.
>>
>
> There's a great idea! Take a little digital indoor/outdoor thermometer and
> put the outdoor sensor up against the back of an iphone between your body
> and the phone. Of course, in your pocket the phone isn't normally doing
> much but monitoring the control channel of the cells and the email program.
> Make it busy by running something CPU intensive like a big game in demo
> mode to make it busy.
>
> The added insulation of your clothes, like the inside pocket of a suit or
> heavy jeans or even the insulated case it comes with, should make it quite
> hot.
>

I find when it's in a pocket it doesn't get hot - at least no warmer
than I am.
The iphone generates little heat when the ipod is in use, it's only when
I'm holding and using the screen it ever gets warm, I suspect that's my
hand preventing the heat dissipating effectively, big hands = very
little surface area exposed.

Mike

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#46
July 27, 2009 at 18:53:41
Michelle Steiner wrote:
> In article <h4vl89$ill$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
> Mike <mikeloveschampagneandrugby@googlemail.com> wrote:
>
>> I find when it's in a pocket it doesn't get hot - at least no warmer
>> than I am.
>
> I carry mine on a waistband holster, and I live in the Phoenix, AZ area,
> where it routinely gets about 110 daily. No problem with my iPhone
> overheating. Maybe because it's a 3G and not a 3Gs.
>

Never trusted waistband holsters, a friends slipped off his belt whilst
going to the loo. As luck would have it it fell into the bowl. After
drying out it worked but he was convinced it smelled of pee.

Mike

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#47
July 27, 2009 at 19:53:41
Michelle Steiner <michelle@michelle.org> wrote in news:michelle-
127849.14341331072009@nothing.attdns.com:

> Maybe because it's a 3G and not a 3Gs.
>
>

This may be the reason because your 3G runs at 400 Mhz, the 3GS is
overclocked to 600 Mhz, generating much more heat from much more switching.

--
Larry

http://flightaware.com/analysis/all...
Each tiny red dot is an airliner in this Quicktime movie, ONE recent day of
air travel in the USA. What would happen if "they" found out this was the
real source of air pollution or cancer or why all the bugs around my
streetlight have disappeared? Would "they" tell us? Would "they" STOP
IT?!

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#48
July 27, 2009 at 20:53:41
Mike <mikeloveschampagneandrugby@googlemail.com> wrote in news:h4vpab$17m$1
@news.eternal-september.org:

> Never trusted waistband holsters, a friends slipped off his belt whilst
> going to the loo. As luck would have it it fell into the bowl. After
> drying out it worked but he was convinced it smelled of pee.
>
> Mike
>
>

I used to pitch in fixing pagers at a friend's paging company to help him
out when I got bored.....

I opened up a pager a customer had returned on the bench and the stench of
the water trapped inside for WEEKS since he returned it sure cleaned out
the whole store of people in a hurry....

Yecch!

They all taunted me something awful after that calling me Leaky Larry....
(c;] I miss paging. It was great fun selling pagers to some of the
sleaziest people on the street. The drug dealers would buy one and hand
you a $100 bill, waving you off with the change in your hands with $85
change in it. You never saw him. The prostitutes always tried to trade
for them, but we needed cash worse....dammit.

--
Larry

http://flightaware.com/analysis/all...
Each tiny red dot is an airliner in this Quicktime movie, ONE recent day of
air travel in the USA. What would happen if "they" found out this was the
real source of air pollution or cancer or why all the bugs around my
streetlight have disappeared? Would "they" tell us? Would "they" STOP
IT?!

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#49
July 27, 2009 at 21:53:41
In article <310720092025336667%nospam@nospam.invalid>,
nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> > > You're sounding more and more like an Apple hater...
> >
> > More and more? Since when has it ever been less?
>
> before apple was founded.

I doubt that he had been born yet.

--
Member National Rifle Association
Member American Civil Liberties Union
Member Human Rights Campaign

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#50
July 27, 2009 at 22:53:41
In article <jollyroger-8D23DB.09450701082009@news.individual.net>,
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> > > You're sounding more and more like an Apple hater...
> >
> > More and more? Since when has it ever been less?
>
> Well I just got here relatively recently, so...

I'm so used to seeing you that that didn't register.

Larry is this newsgroup's equivalent of zara or yugo.

--
Member National Rifle Association
Member American Civil Liberties Union
Member Human Rights Campaign

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#51
July 27, 2009 at 23:53:41
In article <michelle-35CDFA.20094931072009@nothing.attdns.com>,
Michelle Steiner <michelle@michelle.org> wrote:

> In article <jollyroger-EBB25F.20312131072009@news.individual.net>,
> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:
>
> > You're sounding more and more like an Apple hater...
>
> More and more? Since when has it ever been less?

Well I just got here relatively recently, so...

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#52
July 28, 2009 at 00:53:41
In article <michelle-0292C7.08365501082009@nothing.attdns.com>,
Michelle Steiner <michelle@michelle.org> wrote:

> In article <jollyroger-8D23DB.09450701082009@news.individual.net>,
> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:
>
> > > > You're sounding more and more like an Apple hater...
> > >
> > > More and more? Since when has it ever been less?
> >
> > Well I just got here relatively recently, so...
>
> I'm so used to seeing you that that didn't register.
>
> Larry is this newsgroup's equivalent of zara or yugo.

It's all making sense now...

--
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#53
July 28, 2009 at 01:53:41
Michelle Steiner <michelle@michelle.org> wrote in news:michelle-
7ED633.05105801082009@nothing.attdns.com:

> I doubt that he had been born yet.
>

I was born in 1946. I was quite old when Apple built their first wonderful
invention....


--
Larry

http://flightaware.com/analysis/all...
Each tiny red dot is an airliner in this Quicktime movie, ONE recent day of
air travel in the USA. What would happen if "they" found out this was the
real source of air pollution or cancer or why all the bugs around my
streetlight have disappeared? Would "they" tell us? Would "they" STOP
IT?!

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


Report •

#54
July 28, 2009 at 02:53:41
Jolly Roger <jollyroger pobox.com> wrote:

> IDIOT. PLEASE FIX YOUR BROKEN QUOTING (see below)!
>
> ...or you know what? Maybe I'll just go ahead and kill all your posts
> and be done with it.

Go ahead and play with your imaginary kill file friend,
top-posting clown.


>
>
>
> Path: news.astraweb.com!border1.newsrouter.astraweb.com!feed.news.qwest.net!mpls-nntp-06.inet.qwest.net!fu-berlin.de!uni-berlin.de!individual.net!not-for-mail
> From: Jolly Roger <jollyroger pobox.com>
> Newsgroups: misc.phone.mobile.iphone
> Subject: Re: 3GS and skin cases
> Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2009 16:38:44 -0500
> Organization: People for the Ethical Treatment of Pirates
> Lines: 112
> Message-ID: <jollyroger-D00195.16384427072009 news.individual.net>
> References: <h4ggfn$kuo$1 news.eternal-september.org> <h4h4s4$qf3$1 news.eternal-september.org> <2nmtseqlf9v.umvdtxqn7aiv$.dlg 40tude.net> <h4ktbt$5eg$1 news.eternal-september.org> <udiuurc242hf.lwyovn1u68zz$.dlg 40tude.net> <h4l0os$rfh$2 news.eternal-september.org> <00b522df$0$13143$c3e8da3 news.astraweb.com>
> X-Trace: individual.net t3WDnastap3eZjAsOnKMrQIHFdGSqq4ovZIEZszYUg734Yok67
> X-Orig-Path: jollyroger
> Cancel-Lock: sha1:Ko42tBFZsLL6rWOPattFR2xXMJY=
> Mail-Copies-To: nobody
> User-Agent: MT-NewsWatcher/3.5.3b3 (Intel Mac OS X)
> X-Face: _.g>n!a$f3/H3jA]>9pN55*5<`}Tud57>1<n LQ!aZ7vLO_nWbK~ T'XIS0,oAJcU.qLMdk /j8Udo?O"o9B9Jyx+ez2:B<nx(k3EdHnTvB]'eoVaR495,Rv~/vPa[e^JI+^h5Zk*i`Q;ezqDW<ZFs 6kmAJWZjOH\8[$$7jm,Ogw3C_%QM'|H6nygNGhhl+ }n30Nz(^vWo h>Y%b|b-Y~()~\t,LZ3eup1/ bO{=-)
>

archived from misc.phone.mobile.iphone


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#55
January 17, 2010 at 19:13:56
I personally think that a silicone case is better. I've been more scared of my phone dropping when there is a hard shell on it compared to when it has a thick silicone which I think absorbs the impact a lot more. I have a Stripe Style Black Silicone Skin Case for iPhone 3GS for months, and it work well to protect my iPhone from dust, finger prints, oil and scratches damage in my daily using time.

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