xfire 5770 or 6870/6850? PSU might be problem

March 19, 2011 at 08:22:52
Specs: Windows 7 64-bit, 4gb Ram
hello, currently i got 1 5770 running on a 1080p screen and im looking to upgrade to either a 6850 or a 6870 but i do have a xfire ready mobo and im thinking of getting a 2nd hand 5770 but

i got a 500w cooler master psu, the sticker says:

+3.3V - 22A / +5V - 20A / +12V1 - 20A / +12V2 - 20A / -12V - .08A / +5VSB - 2.5A

Can this run a single 6850 or 6870? and if i want to Xfire a 5770 will i need a new PSU? I was searching through google and found a few links that says its possible to run a 6870 on a good 500w PSU and i have even seen some people say its possible to run 2 5770 on a 500w PSU.

so question:

1: Should i buy another 5770 and xfire if my PSU can handle it? and then maybe buy a new PSU down the road?
2: Should i buy a 6850 or 6870 instead and keep my current PSU?
3: Should i just buy a new PSU for now and save up later for a better GPU?

Rest of system spec (to know power draw)

Athlon x4 620 at 3.25Ghz
4 Gig ddr3 kingston value ram
1 HDD and 3 fans in case.

Im open for a Nvidia card as well but they usually draw even more power. so if you can recommend something from them that will be a good upgrade go ahead, i would say my budget but its Rands (R) not dollars ($) so kinda pointless.

thnx.


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#1
March 19, 2011 at 08:48:58
The model number would have been helpful. Cooler Master makes PSUs of varying quality. For example, the GX Series is very good, the eXtreme Series is not so good. You stated that your board supports Crossfire, does your PSU?

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#2
March 19, 2011 at 09:13:52
I think its this one

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

and no it's not xfire ready, but i have seen lots of forums where people say its possible to run 2 5770's on a 500w


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#3
March 19, 2011 at 09:27:47
By the way, I am presently re-loading a friend's system that has a 600 watt Coolermaster PS he bought about two years ago and have found it's single 120mm fan is not working.
I looked up the model on the web and found this model is known to have fan problems, it has only a one year warranty (found that on the web, not on the Coolermaster web site), and the fan has cheap sleeve bearings on both sides.
Extreme Power RP-600-PCAR
The fan jerks back and forth rather than spinning, so it's probably it's temp controlled speed control that has failed, but fans with sleeve bearings on both sides last the shortest amount of time.

I have attached a case fan to the outlet of it to pull air through it until I get a 120mm case fan installed in it, and now it gets warm rather than HOT..

The fan was working fine a few months ago when I was removing malware from his system.
...........

Power requirements

5770
450 Watt or greater power supply with one 75W 6-pin PCI Express® power connectors recommended (600 Watt and two 6-pin connectors for ATI CrossFireX™ technology in dual mode)
http://www.amd.com/us/products/desk...

Also from the AMD web site

6850
500 Watt or greater power supply recommended

6870
500 Watt or greater power supply with two 75W 6-pin PCI Express® power connectors recommended (600 Watt and four 6-pin connectors for AMD CrossFireX™ technology in dual mode)

Certified power supplies are recommended. Refer to http://ati.amd.com/certifiedPSU for a list of Certified products

The listed PSs have lists of video chipsets they can be used with but they don't necessarily have 5770 or 6850 or 6870 listed.

However you can look up the min recommended wattage for whatever they list by going here:
http://www.amd.com/us/products/desk...

Look up the model and search for watt - it's either on the first page or at a System Requirements page link on that page .

E.g. I looked at some Coolermaster models and they list 4850 and 4870

4870 - 500 watts and two power connectors
4850 - 450 watts and two power connectors


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Related Solutions

#4
March 19, 2011 at 10:27:09
I dont like going by what AMD recommends, as my current setup doesnt even break 300w under full load yet they recommend a 450w.

Anyway thnx for that response Tubesandwires, im taking it the 6870 will run on my PSU and that its a better choice than going with a new PSU and a 2nd 5770?


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#5
March 19, 2011 at 11:39:24
So I guess you more more than the manufacturer?

Since your system doesn't break 300W under full load, why not use a 300W PSU? Assuming you know the correct answer to that question, you should know why a 450W makes more sense & why it is therefore recommended.


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#6
March 19, 2011 at 12:56:07
i think they overstate cause many people have generic PSU's and not quality brands

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#7
March 19, 2011 at 14:10:00
"as my current setup doesnt even break 300w under full load yet"

How are you able to measure that ?

"...im taking it the 6870 will run on my PSU and that its a better choice than going with a new PSU and a 2nd 5770?..."

I don't know. There may be a review in the web that compares the two choices.

It does no harm to have more PS capacity than you need, but it certainly CAN do harm if the PS capacity is inadequate.
PSs often fry something else when they fail completely, and when they do that they often fry the mboard, sometimes other components too.
The more el-cheapo the quality of the PS, the more likely that is. E.g.Emachines desktop computers usually have BESTEC power supplies and they often fry at least the mboard when they fail completely, and sometimes when they're merely malfunctioning.
If you want to take that risk rather than buying a relatively inexpensive good quality PS with a greater capacity, that's up to you.

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.

If it doesn't say max xxx total watts continuous (output) on the label,it's probably an intermittant rating. I've seen very few PSs that have a continuous rating printed on them and when you do it's a second lower rating
The problem Coolermaster model i mentioned above is only 70% efficient.
I don't know of any PS that is more than 85% efficient.


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