Wiped external HDD not recognized/shown

March 16, 2020 at 13:04:59
Specs: Windows 7, 4 GB
Windows 7
I wiped two hard drives external with Dban. They are not recognizable by any of my three notebooks anymore. Computer management or explorer don't show them. After inserting them, the light of enclosure is lit for 2 seconds before getting turned off. HDD spinning is ok when connected to any port. I tried other USB/working external drives and they are working fine/recognizable in all my notebooks.

See More: Wiped external HDD not recognized/shown

Reply ↓  Report •

#1
March 16, 2020 at 13:58:18
You need to use Disk Management to partition and format them.

Reply ↓  Report •

#2
March 18, 2020 at 04:34:52
iJack!
Thank you for your answer. As I explained, Computer management or explorer don't show them.

Reply ↓  Report •

#3
March 18, 2020 at 05:18:06
Specifically - it does not show in Disk Management (note "Disk" not "Computer")?

message edited by ijack


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
March 18, 2020 at 05:34:12
Is the bios recognizing them?

Reply ↓  Report •

#5
March 18, 2020 at 20:28:42
You go to:
Start>Control Panel>Administrative Tools>Computer Management>Disk Manager
That is where you need to look.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
March 19, 2020 at 22:06:14
ijack, Johnw, Fingers,
Thank you very much for your answers.

They are not shown in Disk Management. Dban seems to have destroyed their settings/firmware/file system/MBR or whatever. They're new Seagate 500 GB both. Not detectable in other notebooks I tried with as well. By the way, I have got more external drives that work fine when connected to these three notebooks.
I have now connected them to an HP compaq notebook, AMD 64 bit Windows 7. And bios too doesn't seem to know about their presence.
The only place they show their presence in is Device and Printers seen as Unknown Device. Troubleshooting only ends up with "the best Driver is already installed for your device" message.

Both when connected generate a pop up "USB Device Not Recognized".

Deep sighs!

Thank you once again for your time. Hope someone comes up with a solution as to how would we be able to inject into them their firmware/MBR/File System/driver etc that is forcing them to be aliens to the notebooks, and are shown not connected except in Device and Printers.


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
March 20, 2020 at 01:16:08
You could try one of the free partition manager tools from EaseUS or Paragon to see if they recognize the drives, but I wouldn't hold out too many hopes if Disk Management can't see them. They should show up there as uninitialised disks.

Reply ↓  Report •

#8
March 20, 2020 at 01:19:16
Try this Free boot ( in other words, treat it like installing windows & change your bios settings ) disk.
If File Manager doesn't pick up the drives, Lazesoft has many, many other tools built in.

How to Boot a Computer from a Lazesoft Recovery USB Device
http://www.lazesoft.com/create-a-bo...
How to Burn a Lazesoft Recovery CD
http://www.lazesoft.com/burn-a-boot...

https://www.softpedia.com/get/Syste...
http://www.lazesoft.com/lazesoft-re...
The first screen that opens, down the bottom is File Manager.
https://www.directupload.net/file/d...
https://www.directupload.net/file/d...
Or, use the Start menu.
http://www.lazesoft.com/windows-rec...



message edited by Johnw


Reply ↓  Report •

#9
March 20, 2020 at 03:22:21
A search of the Internet shows that quite a few people have this problem. Sometimes it's simply that they don't understand about partitioning and formatting, but others claim - as here - that Disk Manager and Device Manager don't recognize the disk. The most helpful solution I have seen is to try the disk in a desktop PC, where the current supplied to the USB ports is generally higher. Alternatively, you could use a Y-cable to connect two USB ports to the drive thus supplying more current.

I have never understood why people are so keen on DBan. Over the years I have seen numerous posts where people have trouble with it. I would only use a disk-wipe utility from a trusted software company - even then, use extreme caution. Do you really need to completely zap a disk, especially one that you are going to continue using? Simply deleting files and partitions should be secure enough for all but the most paranoid. It's like encryption, which seems to cause more real problems than the imaginary ones it solves.


Reply ↓  Report •

#10
March 20, 2020 at 14:03:58
I always understood that Dban was to wipe a hard drive before throwing it away or selling a computer when you did not care about the drive. I see no reason to use it when you plan on using the drive again for yourself. For that you only need to delete all partitions and create a new partition(s) and format it. If you are using the drive for yourself there is little need for a secure erase. Also when you format the drive there is the option for a quick format or a full format. The quick format just clears the partition table and the full format writes 1's and 0's across the drive which should be safe enough for yourself. For a business getting rid of old hard drives there are two methods to make sure that critical data does not fall into the hands of someone else like a competitor or hacker. One are programs like Dban. The other method is the hammer method. Just simply hammer away at it until it cannot be used again and a bigger hammer is more secure. Some even drill holes onto the plates. I like the hammer method because it takes out frustration better.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Reply ↓  Report •

#11
April 3, 2020 at 00:50:09
You need to test the drive on another machine and if it behaves the same, time to call its maker to get it exchanged.

Reply ↓  Report •

Ask Question