Solved Windows 7 driver for 5¼-inch floppy drive

February 4, 2015 at 12:22:02
Specs: Windows7
Will Win 7 recognize an old 5 1/4 floppy drive, or will I have to install a pre XP OS? I have a old genealogy program that is on the old floppy. Need to transfer it to a CD.
Thanks,
Nick

See More: Windows 7 driver for 5¼-inch floppy drive

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✔ Best Answer
February 6, 2015 at 02:21:47
Expanding on Dave`s #4.

Surely the start point is check in the bios, to ascettain whether or not it provides options to set drive A and/or B for 5.25" disks.

If so, a 5.25" drive can be installed, although you may need power and/or interface cables or adaptors..

Then you can do your copying.

However if you just want to copy a few files to a cd (or dvd) it might be easier to find someone nearby who has a working 5.25" drive.

Be warned though, it appears increasingly difficult to run older dos programs on new equipement, more so when printers are involved. .

Good Luck - Keep us posted.



#1
February 4, 2015 at 13:29:22
I have an old geneology program that runs in DOS. It is installed on a
computer running Windows 98 SE. If your program runs in DOS, then
the floppy might have the required DOS right on it! If it does, then you
just need to copy the files to a hard drive. If you have an IDE hard drive
which is formatted as FAT 16, then I'm pretty sure you can do it. If you
have an IDE hard drive formatted as FAT 32, then I think it depends on
the version of DOS on the floppy. I'm not sure that older versions of
DOS can read or write to drives formatted as FAT 32. If do not have
an IDE hard drive, only a SATA drive, then I'm not sure you can do it
with DOS. The hard drive partition also needs to be small enough for
DOS to handle.

If you have an old IDE hard drive but don't have a copy of DOS on the
geneology disk, you should be able to find it on another floppy that has
a standalone DOS program. To read and write to a FAT 32 hard drive,
the version of DOS needs to be what came with Windows 95 or later.
I think that is DOS version 6. The final version of DOS, as far as I know,
was 6.22, although the version that came with Windows may have been
considered to be version 7. Versions 7 and 6.22 may be identical.

You should be able to find some version of DOS on a floppy you already
have, or get it for free somewhere. The full DOS package had a whole
bunch of floppies full of files, but all you need are the three files that are
on disks containing standalone programs: COMMAND.COM, IO.SYS,
and MSDOS.SYS.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#2
February 4, 2015 at 14:38:43
Yes, Windows still recognizes floppy drives of all sizes. (I think it even works with 8" disks.) This, obviously, pre-supposes that your computer has a connector for a floppy disk drive; most modern boards don't.

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#3
February 4, 2015 at 15:17:26
I agree with ijack. In that case consider using USB external 5¼-inch floppy drive to access your discs. Google for it.

i_Xp/Vista/W7User

message edited by XpUser


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Related Solutions

#4
February 4, 2015 at 19:41:42
If you're thinking of installing an internal drive you need to make sure the bios will see it. I think a lot of the newer motherboards don't support 5.25 drives.

Also, 5.25 drives come in 360K and 1.2 meg types. A 360K drive won't see a 1.2 meg disk so make sure you know what you need.


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#5
February 5, 2015 at 03:40:59
DAVEINCAPS is quite right. In fact the BIOS on my 2-year old motherboard doesn't support floppy drives at all, they're obsolete.

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#6
February 5, 2015 at 08:21:32
I was told XP dosen't recognize the 360 51/4 drive?? I have a machine with a 3 1/2 drive so thought it should read the 5 1/4 as the ribbon has the connection.

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#7
February 5, 2015 at 19:47:54
The ribbon cable with both pin and slide connections may have just been what someone used when the PC was assembled and may not indicate what drives the bios will see. You'd probably have to connect it up and then see if it's recognized.

Those drives usually had drive select (DS) jumpers. Your drive cable probably has the 7-wire twist in it. In that case the jumper would be at the second DS option and you'd connect the drive at the end connection--after the twist--to set it as drive a. For drive b you'd attach it at the middle connection--before the twist.

I'm not sure what XP supports. I thought it could write to only 1.44 but could read from older types but have never tried older drives with it.


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#8
February 6, 2015 at 02:21:47
✔ Best Answer
Expanding on Dave`s #4.

Surely the start point is check in the bios, to ascettain whether or not it provides options to set drive A and/or B for 5.25" disks.

If so, a 5.25" drive can be installed, although you may need power and/or interface cables or adaptors..

Then you can do your copying.

However if you just want to copy a few files to a cd (or dvd) it might be easier to find someone nearby who has a working 5.25" drive.

Be warned though, it appears increasingly difficult to run older dos programs on new equipement, more so when printers are involved. .

Good Luck - Keep us posted.


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#9
February 17, 2015 at 10:24:27
Found someone with a working 3.11 Machine. Thanks for all the feedback!!
Nick

message edited by Bignick


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#10
February 17, 2015 at 10:25:55
Shame they only allow one "best answer". They were all good!! Thanks again.
Nick

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#11
May 27, 2015 at 08:41:24
If you can't get the drive to work in Windows 7, your best bet might be to boot from optical disk--maybe the Ultimate Boot CD for Windows, or say an Ubuntu or other Linux DVD. Copy the data off to flash drive or hard drive, and call it done.

If that doesn't work, I have an old box that can still read 5¼" disks; if you get me the disks I can fire up the old beast and get the data off. My email is lordpeyre (at) yahoo.com.

Also, if you're having trouble getting the program to run once you recover it, you might have to use DOSBox: http://www.dosbox.com/

message edited by LeonB


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