Solved Will using two GFX cards from different makers still work?

April 6, 2017 at 23:39:51
Specs: Windows 10 64bit, 8gb 1866
I bought a brand new Ati Radeon 480rx card and it is working extremely well. However, I did a benchmark and it showed that my CPU is the absolute bottleneck in my pc so I upgraded my motherboard and processor with a "Fry's Ad" and this one has a motherboard that has two PCI-E slots and not just one, like I am used to having.

My question is, is it better to just run my Ati card alone or could and should run it with my opposing Nvidia Geforce 730ti card in tandem and knowing full well that the cards are from two entirely different makers?

Would the Ati and the Nvidia card have conflicts or with how advanced the Ati card is right now, would it even be worth the effort? Thanks.


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✔ Best Answer
April 7, 2017 at 12:26:15
Yeah, drivers from ATi and Nvidia have a history of not working together. I don't know if the situation has improved, but I don't know why it would.

Even if the drivers behaved, the cards wouldn't pool their resources together. It might have benefit if you have a multi-monitor setup, with each card powering its own monitor, but that's the best case scenario.

That said, if you have 2+ monitors, the video cards, and the PSU to run everything, you lose nothing by trying. Just have the driver cleanup tools for both manufacturers handy, and make sure your new MB works before trying out any video card shenanigans.

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#1
April 7, 2017 at 05:48:31
The cards could not work together and there probably would be a conflict. They could not run off the same graphics driver and both drivers would further cause conflict. As far as I know there is no 730 ti, there is a GT 730 but only a GTX 750 ti (or higher) if that is what you mean. To any advantage you would need the same graphics chip brand and probably the exact same card to properly work together though sometimes a higher level card would give same or similar performance with less current draw and multiple cards often require a big step up on the power supply as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
April 7, 2017 at 07:56:51
Oh, I haven't actually gotten the new motherboard yet. I bought it from Fry's Electronics and it arrives by mail on Wednesday.

I just was wondering about if this setup would work from those who have tried this before as anyone who has worked on the hardware of PCs would know from experience, you don't go and screw around with your PC, just to screw around with and I would rather hear from someone else first than to do just this.

Thanks.


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#3
April 7, 2017 at 11:28:45
Post the model of the new motherboard.

Fingers is correct in that you can't mix cards with different brands of GPUs. Furthermore, to run in SLI or Crossfire, you should have matched cards.

Running two cards in SLI or Crossfire first requires that the board support it. You may need a more powerful power supply and the best you may achieve is a 40% or so boost from running a single card. That depends on the game or program in use too.

In short, IMO I wouldn't bother with two cards. Most boards drop each card from running at 16x to 8x per card because there are only so many PCIe lanes available.

There are SOME motherboards that may allow you to use integrated graphics and an add in card, with certain restrictions on which integrated graphics are on the board.


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#4
April 7, 2017 at 12:26:15
✔ Best Answer
Yeah, drivers from ATi and Nvidia have a history of not working together. I don't know if the situation has improved, but I don't know why it would.

Even if the drivers behaved, the cards wouldn't pool their resources together. It might have benefit if you have a multi-monitor setup, with each card powering its own monitor, but that's the best case scenario.

That said, if you have 2+ monitors, the video cards, and the PSU to run everything, you lose nothing by trying. Just have the driver cleanup tools for both manufacturers handy, and make sure your new MB works before trying out any video card shenanigans.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#5
April 7, 2017 at 19:24:49
Fair enough, this makes far more sense than the last comment for me. I won't do a double GFX card system but as you asked, I bought the "MSI 970A SLI Krait Edition AM3+ AMD 970 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.1 ATX AMD Motherboard" CPU and Motherboard combo for just around $120 dollars.

I would add the AMD processor in with it but it is the motherboard that is what you asked for so here it is.


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#6
April 7, 2017 at 21:13:05
Without getting into reading the manual. That board supports "Multi-GPU: AMD CrossFire Support". So, you could add a second ATI Radeon 480 to run them in crossfire.

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#7
April 8, 2017 at 00:04:22
I could but I have two kids and a life outside of PCs. To be honest with you, I mainly bought the far more expensive rx480 ATI card as the Nvidia 1050 flat out wouldn't work stable in my pc, even knowing it was brand new and I returned it and flat out went for ATI this time.

I then wanted to get the 460, 440, or whatever it was as I forgot the middle range cards name but the store only had one left and the box was open. So I was annoyed and spent an additional $60+ for this card.

If anything, I may want to buy a lesser rx4xx card and then maybe add that to be the secondary but I figure one graphics card should be enough. I was just wondering so I asked as this site is quite good and I haven't been here in a long while.

Thanks.


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#8
April 8, 2017 at 05:32:15
Spending the extra $60. you have the performance of two lower grade cards for maybe $100. less with less power demands than two cards. See how it goes, you may not need another now. If you do then you need to make sure that your power supply can handle both or you will need to add that to the cost.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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