Solved Will a case fan work plugged into the AIO_PUMP connector?

June 6, 2017 at 15:26:05
Specs: Windows 10, Intel core i7 7700k base clock, 16gb DDR4 RAM
I have an ASUS Prime Z270-A motherboard in my pc. I am currently using the CPU_Fan slot, the H_Amp_Fan slot and CHA_Fan 1 and 2 slots. I would like to buy a couple more fans since I plan on overclocking my CPU. However I may make it to a total of seven fans but my motherboard has 6 fan slots and one AIO pump slot. The AIO slot looks the same as the other fan slots so I would like to know if it can be used to power a fan like any of the other slots. Thanks!

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✔ Best Answer
June 6, 2017 at 17:48:46
The AIO-pump is designed for a water-cooling system , most likely together with the EXT-FAN (sensors).
The CHASIS-FAN's should be sufficient. You can also use fans running at 12V running at a continuous (high) speed.
The point is to have unobstructed airflow in your case, equally important to put the box in ventilated position/area. Not somewhere stowed under a table/desk or cabinet.


#1
June 6, 2017 at 15:45:39
You don't need more than 2 fans plus the power supply fan. 120/140MM rear discharge fan possibly a top discharge, depending on top or bottom mount power supply. No side case fans. Front not needed.

Post the model of your case, or if unavailable, a photo.


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#2
June 6, 2017 at 16:29:09
Thanks for the reply. My case is the Rosewill Nautilus. I am still wondering if the AIO pump slot can power a fan.

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#3
June 6, 2017 at 16:33:59
An overclock does not need that many fans. CPU fan. One rear fan high CFM high in the rear. IF bottom power supply optional top fan set to exhaust. That is all that is required. For multiple hard drives or high level graphics cards you can add a front intake fan as an option. That is all! Do NOT use a side fan as this disrupts the proper flow of cool air over all components with the aid of convection. Do NOT bother with secondary top or front fans they do nothing good.
You DO need a good heat sink set up for your overclock. I recommend a good tower type cooler with 120mm a fan and the option to add a second matching fan if it becomes apparent that you need one with a Y plug into the same port (rare, actually). I do NOT recommend the self contained 'water' coolers and favor the reliability and simplicity of a copper mass heat sink, cooling fins, and fan. I use a Noctua with 120mm fan and 28C idle temps on all 4 cores @4.3GHz on 4690K and have never seen over mid 50C's so far. I am confident that if I want to I can run at least 4.6GHz at reasonable temps 24/7 with this set up.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#4
June 6, 2017 at 16:42:11
Thanks for responding. I plan on overclocking my 7700k to 5.0ghz. Right now I'm using a hyper 212 evo to cool it at 4.7ghz. I looked on other threads and people said an evo with two fans can keep 5.0ghz cool. Should I just buy one fan for the evo and forget about buying the others? (I'm trying to get the most out of my CPU)

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#5
June 6, 2017 at 17:48:46
✔ Best Answer
The AIO-pump is designed for a water-cooling system , most likely together with the EXT-FAN (sensors).
The CHASIS-FAN's should be sufficient. You can also use fans running at 12V running at a continuous (high) speed.
The point is to have unobstructed airflow in your case, equally important to put the box in ventilated position/area. Not somewhere stowed under a table/desk or cabinet.

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#6
June 6, 2017 at 17:57:17
Thank you for the answer.

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#7
June 6, 2017 at 19:27:26
Do you really think the added investment is worthwhile for a measly 300Mhz additional overclock? What do you use your system for that would require 5.0GHz? Just curious.

The case cooling fan issue has been explained - less is more. You could have helped yourself by getting a case with a top mounted PSU but unfortunately, people have been suckered into thinking the bottom mount design is better. At least the Nautilus has feet to allow fresh air into the PSU & somewhat prevent it from vacuuming up crumbs, hair, dust, etc., but the perforations in the underside restrict airflow.

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod...

This article is old, but it's just as true today as it was in 2008: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...


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#8
June 6, 2017 at 19:59:55
Thanks for the information and those articles. I just want the most out of my system. I really only use my pc for gaming, and I have not had any problems so far concerning CPU speed. It probably isn't worth the investment. I do however plan on upgrading to a 4k monitor sometime this year, and I am not sure how much that will increase the temperature of my pc. I'll wait till then to see I really NEED an extra fan.

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#9
June 6, 2017 at 20:57:11
The second fan on the CPU heat sink is an option that you can wait until you see the temps as you use it. The two fans if they are identical can be plugged in using a 4pin Y fan connector to use only one port.
Additional case fans should not be needed but if chipset and hard drives get hotter you can see about additional exhaust fan top rear. Better would be to find the highest CFM fan (and 140mm is better than 120mmm if it fits) you can find with a relatively low DB rating for your primary exhaust fan (I prefer dual ball bearing models). Please note that you can override fan speeds in BIOS to keep the exhaust fan running faster but it will be quieter if you allow the BIOS to control them. You can also get a fan speed controller which runs off one of your unused Molex connectors and can be mounted through one of the covers for the unused external drive bays and find a balance between air and noise.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
June 7, 2017 at 14:39:32
"I really only use my pc for gaming"

I didn't see a graphics card mentioned, which one do you have?

"I do however plan on upgrading to a 4k monitor sometime this year, and I am not sure how much that will increase the temperature of my pc"

I wouldn't expect it will affect temps much at all. The unnamed graphics card will be doing the bulk of the work. And be aware that the "4K" label is a bit of a misnomer. Resolution had been described as the number of horizontal lines of vertical resolution, basically, the "length" of the short side of the screen. 1280×720 was called 720p; 1920x1080 was called 1080p. If 4K were to stay with the old naming standard, it would be called 2160p.


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#11
June 7, 2017 at 16:23:41
I have a gtx 1080 ti, and that is listed in my pc specs.

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