Solved Why isn't PS/2 port working on old Gateway 2000 PC from 1991

August 17, 2014 at 18:28:29
Specs: MS-DOS 6.22 / Windows 3.1, 4096 KB, everything else unknown
I have an old computer (specs below), and I have an issue with the PS/2 keyboard port.
I have tried 4 keyboards, all which work with other computers, and none of them worked with the computer. I couldn't get past the BIOS screen with the errors that require a key press. Could somebody please help me?

Here are the computer specs that I know of:

* Gateway 2000 computer from 1991
(Latest date seen on 386SX Platform
Board)

* MS-DOS 6.22 (An upgrade) with Windows
3.1 (Installed)

* 640K System RAM

* 3456K Extended RAM


See More: Why isnt PS/2 port working on old Gateway 2000 PC from 1991

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✔ Best Answer
August 18, 2014 at 13:07:33
Hi,

I believe these PS/2 ports have a fuse in the system board that may have blown. I used to work for Gateway back in the late 90's and recall these type of issues when doing technical support. I do believe these fuses are soldered but do not recall any more technical details as I did not have the opportunity to do actual repair work- I relied on my board repair friends to do that :). You may want to talk to a local repair shop that may actually fix this but wonder what they may want to charge...



#1
August 17, 2014 at 21:27:48
Make sure you're plugging the keyboard in the correct PS/2 port (not the mouse port). Are you getting a keyboard error message?

The problem might not be with the keyboard. The system may be locking up due to a hardware problem and you're just assuming it's the keyboard. How long do you let it sit there before shutting it down? Some hardware errors, especially on older systems, may take a few minutes to pop up on the screen.

Don't forget to preorder your Hatch green chili for this fall. Many vendors ship world-wide.


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#2
August 18, 2014 at 08:12:19
Also, are you using a real PS/2 keyboard and not a USB keyboard with an adaptor?

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#3
August 18, 2014 at 11:50:12
Did you read my details? I know it's the computer.
Yes, I plugged it into the keyboard port.
They are PS/2 keyboards that work with other computers.

P.S.: It only takes a few seconds for the error messages to pop up,
even though the computer is 23 years old.

message edited by Joey2


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Related Solutions

#4
August 18, 2014 at 13:07:33
✔ Best Answer
Hi,

I believe these PS/2 ports have a fuse in the system board that may have blown. I used to work for Gateway back in the late 90's and recall these type of issues when doing technical support. I do believe these fuses are soldered but do not recall any more technical details as I did not have the opportunity to do actual repair work- I relied on my board repair friends to do that :). You may want to talk to a local repair shop that may actually fix this but wonder what they may want to charge...


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#5
August 19, 2014 at 00:03:33
Oh yeah, that's right. I replaced one of those once. Depending on the motherboard it may be a surface mount fuse or axial that looks like resistor. The notation for a fuse is going to start with F so it might be something like F101 and will usually be near the PS/2 port. Also, you can't tell by looking at it if it's blown.

Another thing, some old PCs had a keyboard lock on the front panel. If it's in the locked position the KB won't work. The pigtail for the lock is a 2-wire connector among the pin-outs for the LEDs and start. You can just remove that connection to disable the lock feature. Even if there's no keyboard lock on the front panel there might be pins for that option are on the motherboard. It's possible to put a jumper across the KBlock pins to disable the keyboard. So you might want to check that, just in case.

About the error messages; what ones are you getting?

The error messages I'm talking about might take awhile to pop up like a hard drive controller failure.

Don't forget to preorder your Hatch green chili for this fall. Many vendors ship world-wide.


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#6
August 19, 2014 at 06:35:21
Some of these are pretty bad, but the keyboard one is the one I'm trying to
fix first. Below is what I saw when I turned the computer on. All text and unedited:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Quadtel WD7600 286/386SX BIOS Version 3.05.06
Copyright 1987-1990 Quadtel Corp. All Rights Reserved.

00640K System RAM Passed
03456K Extended RAM Passed

System CMOS checksum bad - Run SETUP
Real time clock error
Keyboard error
Diskette drive A error

Press <F1> to resume, <F2> to Setup ...
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

message edited by Joey2


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#7
August 19, 2014 at 06:43:02
There appear to be multiple errors.

Could this occur because the CMOS battery has died?

The clock error is a clue but I couldn't be sure.


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#8
August 19, 2014 at 07:45:31
A few days ago, it had this error message:

System batteries are dead - Replace and Run SETUP

I replaced the batteries, the battery error is gone, but the CMOS, clock, and keyboard errors are still there.

message edited by Joey2


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#9
August 19, 2014 at 13:54:26
Did you try entering the BIOS screens and resetting the adjustable values as required.

Also, the PS/2 controller can get damaged. PS/2 keyboards are NOT hot swappable. Connecting one while under power can damage the controller.

There is also a setting in most BIOS screens to stop the boot process on all errors.


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#10
August 19, 2014 at 23:39:13
I don't think it's even letting him get into bios setup.

The clock error is likely because the date is at the bios default date--1-1-80 on some older systems--so it 'knows' the date is wrong.

The floppy error might be a cmos setting. It might be defaulting to a drive you don't have. Or it may be bad or connected or jumpered wrong. Has anyone been inside the computer between the time it was working and now?

I assume the <F1> resume option isn't workng either so it's not booting to an OS.

The keyboard error pretty much has to be one of suggestions we've made in the postings above.

Don't forget to preorder your Hatch green chili for this fall. Many vendors ship world-wide.


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#11
August 20, 2014 at 05:10:37
I found out starting with the MFG test switch, then removing it 3 seconds after the last error is displayed gets you past the <F1> to continue... prompt only to find this error:

Diskette error - Press any key ...

Why does it worry so much about not having a diskette drive. It never had a working one since the late 90's. Then again, there must be a BIOS Setup option to disable the floppy drive because it has been booting to an OS in more recent years.

message edited by Joey2


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#12
August 20, 2014 at 09:41:51
As you seem to have replaced the cmos battery and last good/customised settings were thus lost... the defaults will have been applied?

Being an "olde" PC likely the default bios settings were floppy first (typically A) then HD.

Some - if there were two floppy drives installed - went by default A, then B, then HD in the search for a bootable device or disk.

And if there was CDROM present that too was an option in the bootable device (disk) sequence.

Pressing "any key" merely released the default to go looking further for a bootable device/disk etc... Although often if it didn't find A as bootable media then it moved automatically to B or the HD... Current kit does simply step its way through the list of installed bootable device until it finds one that will boot.

There was a recurrent problem however with floppy disks in the boot sequence. Often when one booted up the system would go to the floppy first (not find a bootable media/disk present) and stick there; and pressing any key frequently wouldn't release it and allow to go searching for the next device in the boot-list. I seem to recall there was an alleged M$ fix for this; but often it didn't work. Many actually put a floppy in to simply let the system find a disk, reject it as non-booting. and thus allow one to "press any key" and go to the next device...


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#13
August 20, 2014 at 09:44:12
Incidentally what puzzles me is why you are not able to enter setup (bios settings) prior to the floppy diskette error? Usually there is message on the screen telling you what to press to get there... and it's before any disk/booting errors... Have you seen such a message and have you tried doing what is says?

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#14
August 20, 2014 at 14:13:20
I think most 386's still had bios options for the four popular floppy types at the time--360 K, 1.2 meg, 720 K and 1.44 meg. It may have defaulted to the 360 K when the battery died..

There's was usually a bios option to 'disable floppy drive warning' or words to that affect. But of course you have to be able to get into bios setup in order to change that.

Don't forget to preorder your Hatch green chili for this fall. Many vendors ship world-wide.


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#15
August 20, 2014 at 16:24:37
I can't get into Setup because I am unable to press a key. Remember my question?

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#16
August 20, 2014 at 17:00:07
"Why does it worry so much about not having a diskette drive. It never had a working one since the late 90's."

As mentioned, it's likely not complaining about having a working floppy. It's complaining about having the wrong one (360K vs. 1.2M or 720K vs. 1.44M)

"Then again, there must be a BIOS Setup option to disable the floppy drive because it has been booting to an OS in more recent years."

More than likely it was either completely disabled or looked first to the HDD before the floppy (not very common in 386's, exceptionally uncommon with 386sx's).

Nonetheless, if you've tried multiple 'known-to-be-working" keyboards (and aren't using some sort of USB or DIN to PS/2 adapter) and are unable to get any of them to work, then (obviously) the keyboard port is somehow kaput (which you've already figured out by now)...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#17
August 20, 2014 at 21:46:35
Remove the power and ribbon connector to the floppy drive(s). If the system does not see the drive, it might bypass it.
I believe that the date is an issue, especially since the Y2K bug was a patch for W95 and included in W98.
I do not see how you can get it to work without the ability to boot into the BIOS which will not work without the PS2 port working.
It would be easier to purchase another 'old' computer that is a little bit newer (really cheap) and switch over to that one instead if you do not want to (or cannot) purchase a modern system. Much simpler.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#18
August 21, 2014 at 00:13:43
Um... Of course... The ps2 isn't working at all... Time for another tea ' n toast... To refresh the grey cells...

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#19
August 21, 2014 at 11:44:59
Fingers,

I tried that and nothing changed.

-------------------------------------------------------------------
trvlr,

All 3 keyboard lights flashed constantly on one of the keyboards I tested, but the buttons still don't work. For anybody else, is this a clue? I also found something white (not an electric component) in the keyboard housing (the PS/2 ports have separate housings). I took it out, but nothing changed.


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#20
August 21, 2014 at 13:27:50
In the past when I have had a keyboard flashing all its lights... it's usually been a duff keyboard, or the actual cable (or connector on the cable) that is the problem. That none of three keyboards will work is odd; and the odds of three being duff is a little ...? But then again - who knows..?

I have never had a problem using a ps2-din adapter - allowing me to connect an olde style din plugged keyboard to a ps2 motherboard - when needing to use one when no ps2 keyboard was available. Possibly you may be able to check that way - if you can secure an adapter for a din to ps2 connector...?

Another l-o-o-o-ng shot... check there isn't any dust/muck etc. in the "pinned" (male half of the) connector.

Another item that has had me go round in circles.. at least once if not twice...

Check and verify that the pins on the plug (the male part) are not bent out of alignment; even missing... I have known that to be a problem in the past...; and it's easily overlooked.


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#21
August 21, 2014 at 20:08:48
It might have been mentioned but just to be sure, PS2 ports are NOT hot pluggable. This means that every time you try a different PS2 device you MUST shut down completely and restart or the system will NOT recognize the device.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#22
August 22, 2014 at 08:53:18
With a cold swap every time, I swapped through all of the keyboards. only one keyboard flashes. the other 3 do nothing.

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#23
August 22, 2014 at 09:43:23
Are you using an adapter to the PS/2 keyboards? Computers that old may have the older style keyboard port.

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#24
August 22, 2014 at 10:41:43
No, it has regular PS/2, and surprisingly, no internal old keyboard port.

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#25
August 22, 2014 at 12:34:18
Other than what was mentioned above--the motherboard fuse and the keyboard lock pins (by the way, have you even bothered to check that? You haven't mentioned it.)--have you tried using its original keyboard? As far as I know gateway didn't use proprietary keyboards but I remember having problems with some compaq ps/2 keyboards. But it's something you might think about.

Keyboards for 8088/8066 processor motherboards were different but from the 286 on they should be all compatible. And you say you have a 386.

Don't forget to preorder your Hatch green chili for this fall. Many vendors ship world-wide.


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#26
December 2, 2014 at 18:25:31
Sorry I haven't looked at this since August, here is an update:

1. I connected a video adapter to the computer so I could hook my OLD monitor to my computer.

2. I found an IED3 fuse by the keyboard port. Should I try replacing it? Should I try putting a jumper across it? What should I do?


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#27
December 2, 2014 at 19:26:27
"I found an IED3 fuse by the keyboard port. Should I try replacing it? Should I try putting a jumper across it? What should I do?"

Simply test it with an ohmmeter. If it reads 0 ohms, then it's OK. If not, then replace it.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#28
December 3, 2014 at 04:47:24
It said "0L," which I believe is 0. Correct me if it means a large amount of resistance.

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#29
December 3, 2014 at 05:24:19
An ohm meter wil show a zero if the fuse is OK; meaning there is no resistance - no open cct., the fuse in intact

An analogue meter would show the needle at the zero end of the scale and again indicating - no open cct; that the fuse is intact.

If the fuse has "blown: then the resistance is infinite... The meter will show a value of infinity (digitally speaking), and analogue meter's needle will simply not move off the back rest.

"Usually/always" wise to short the two meter probes together so as to verify the meter is displaying correctly; to calibrate the zero setting... Shorting the probes (touching them together) gives you a clear indication of the meter (zero) setting being correct prior to actually checking/taking any measurements to do with resistance and/or continuity.

Not being sure of the meter you are using... short the probes together as above, and verify what a closed/intact cct. shows. Shorting the probes appro it will show either 0 (zero) on a digital meter, and on the analogue pointer will move to zero (0) end of the scale - usually at the right hand end...

If your fuse shows the same indication when applied /inserted/connected between the probes.. then logically it's OK?


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#30
December 3, 2014 at 05:34:18
Incidentally - as likely you're using a digital meter it may actually be showing OC (not OL...) meaning Open Circuit; which would indicate the fuse has blown as the cct. is not complete.

But testing the meter as above earlier, by touching the probes together, will give you a clear indication of complete (or a short) cct. reading; which is what a sound fuse would indicate (i.e. it if it hasn't "blown")


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#31
December 3, 2014 at 05:53:56
I shorted the probes before I tested and it said 0.0<some random digits>. I put it across the fuse and it said OC (I saw OL, but I know what you're saying).

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#32
December 3, 2014 at 06:16:05
Random digits merely indicates a less than "purrfekt" connection between the probes (oxide/muck etc..) ; but that it essentially shows zero... means you know what zero looks like on that meter; and that would be the same for a sound unblown fuse when tested...

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#33
December 3, 2014 at 16:29:14
Are you sure IED3 is a fuse? Most of those looked like inline resistors.

Try different ohmmeter ranges.


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#34
December 3, 2014 at 18:27:15
I'm pretty sure IED3 is a fuse. It said F1 right by it, and I looked it up.

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#35
December 3, 2014 at 19:43:03
Yeah, F1 would be a fuse. I'm just not sure what IED3 means.

You can desolder it and remove it from the motherboard. Then check it with the ohmmeter again. Or just take it to radio shack or other electronic parts store and have them match it with a new one.


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#36
December 4, 2014 at 01:34:27
Fuses can be small glass tubes/cylinders with metal ends/caps and the innards are visible. Some are ceramic rather than glass, which means the innards are not visible. Usually those with end caps simply plug into a carrier and easily be removed/replaced.

Fuses soldered in are not that common (at least in my limited experience); there is no benefit (other than cost in manufacturing) in having them that way - at least for servicing etc. A removable one as above is logically more user-friendly?

However that the item here is labeled F1 on the board does appear to suggest that it is a fuse; and from info presented thus far, is a soldered pne in this case (provided that it isn't actually one with metal ends in a carrier , which is soldered to to the cct./motherboard)?

If in doubt then either take the unit to e knowledgeable techie for confirmation, or take a photo of the board and fuse?

Do you know the make/model of the computer; or at least the motherboard it uses? The make/model info may allow access to the specs. for the motherboard, and possibly details of components installed...?


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#37
December 5, 2014 at 11:21:22
Here is the link to a picture of the part of the motherboard that is by the PS/2 ports that I took: http://i1370.photobucket.com/albums...

message edited by Joey2


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#38
December 5, 2014 at 14:43:37
mmm.. sorry to say that the pic is very soft (indistinct) and also rather dark... Any chance to take a photo again, with more light and also create a sharper image?

Somewhere on the motherboard there "may" be a model number etc.. If you can find that and post here it would be useful?

Based on the info in your initial post it may be possible to track down more tech info for the motherboard used. And if you can also provide any further info on the actual Gateway model and any further info actually "printed" on the motherboard itself it may also assist?

message edited by trvlr


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#39
December 5, 2014 at 15:33:21
Incidentally the motherboard is likely a Micronics - as a general trawl on the web suggests they are (were?) used by Gateway quite extensively; even though often rebadged by Gateway.

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#40
December 5, 2014 at 16:48:29
If that is indeed your motherboard, then the fuse is F1 (the "longer" green device nearly in the center). If your meter is showing "OC" (open circuit) or "OL" (overload---sounds like you're using some type of Fluke Digital Multimeter) on the Ohms setting measuring across it, then the fuse is open (blown). Replacing F1 (it should be marked for an appropriate value such as 1Amp or "1A") should repair the circuit...assuming something else (possibly a bad keyboard) didn't cause it to blow.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#41
December 5, 2014 at 20:16:22
I'll let you know how that went when I finish (it WILL be several days getting the part, taking out the blown fuse, and putting in another one.


P.S.: The green fuse had IED3 printed on it.

EDIT: There is NOTHING on the web. Have any suggestions, maybe someone might have one laying around?

message edited by Joey2


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#42
December 5, 2014 at 22:25:29
The IED3 may be a manufactering notation and only mean something to them.

I bought a packet of fuses to replace one on a compaq board at least 10 years ago. I have no idea where I put the remaining ones. And I don't remember if they matched it exactly or if I simply bought what I thought would match.

If you desolder that one and take it to an electronics shop they may be able to tell you exactly what its rating is or suggest a close enough replacement. The other option is to take one from a junked motherboard. I would think the rating of any fuse used for the same purpose would be about the same.


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#43
December 6, 2014 at 07:02:46
Quite possibly it's a 3 amp fuse (a Littlefuse/PICO fuse should substitute):

http://www.littelfuse.com/products/...

If you remove it and find some other more definite markings (see the datasheet on the previous site), then replace it with the correct value.

If you don't have soldering experience, then take it to someone who does; an old machine could be rendered useless with careless soldering/ESD techniques.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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