Why does Time & Date at Boot-up always show Tues,Jan1,2002?

January 27, 2015 at 08:58:21
Specs: Windows XP, P5, Dual-Core, 3 GHz, 2 GB RAM
Boot-up always ask to press F1 or F2 . Replacing CMOS Battery, or Resetting BIOS to Default does not help. Entering new Date & Time keeps for the current session only. Maybe one or two more sessions are possible by pressing F2. Again the same thing happens, and I have to Press DEL at Start-up, and repeat the above process.

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#1
January 27, 2015 at 09:22:08
When you set the Time and Date you need to "Save Settings" before exiting the BIOS setup.

message edited by Pappy


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#2
January 27, 2015 at 12:51:22
The cmos battery has failed. On your motherboard, it should be about the size of a quarter.

Your BIOS is just going back to its defaults.


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#3
January 27, 2015 at 18:31:06
Pappy,

EXIT & SAVE CHANGES was always done. No effect !

Dan J,

CMOS Battery was replaced twice within 20 days. No effect !

PPG


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Related Solutions

#4
January 27, 2015 at 19:27:01
Is there a jumper on the motherboard to "clear CMOS" ??
What is the motherboard model/make?

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#5
February 7, 2015 at 01:21:03
The Motherboard Make & Model is ASUS P5G41T-M LX . I have not yet marked any answer as "The Best One" as the problem is still there. I have taken the two usual steps taken in such problems, as mentioned in my replies to the suggestions of Pappy and Dan J.
PPG

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#6
February 7, 2015 at 05:38:32
Have the batteries tested to make sure you aren't purchasing old batteries.
Make sure that you are installing the battery in the proper direction, not up side down (look for the + sign, do not assume it is typical to ordinary batteries).
Are you powering off the power supply or power strip? CMOS batteries generally last many years if the computer stays plugged all of the time but runs down much sooner if the power is completely removed on a regular basis. In fact, the COS settings probably should stay even without the battery if the machine is getting a trickle of power from the power supply all of the time.
If the battery is good, in the right direction, and fully inserted, then the motherboard is probably bad.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#7
February 7, 2015 at 09:20:24
Fingers wrote:

> CMOS batteries generally last many years if the computer stays
> plugged all of the time but runs down much sooner if the power is
> completely removed on a regular basis.

I didn't know that! I've done it both ways. My current computer is
plugged into a power control center which I intended to shut off every
time I'm done with the computer, but instead I've been leaving the
power on, so that the board is always receiving power. It has the
minor side advantage that the USB ports still work as chargers
when the computer is off.

> the CMOS settings probably should stay even without the battery
> if the machine is getting a trickle of power from the power supply
> all of the time.

I didn't know that, either!

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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