Solved Why cant I use my new 4GB ram memory?

December 29, 2017 at 10:43:52
Specs: Windows 7
Okay soo like this, I had 8GB ram DDR3 before I bought extra 4GB DDR3, I made sure it was even both from Kingstone, my Motherboard can support it I checked, and Windows 7 on 64 bit can handle it as well I checked, and soo I plugged the stick in properly but in my Computer Specs says: Installed Memory (RAM): 12GB (7.15 USABLE), and it said 7.15 usable even when I still had the 8GB ram card ONLY, soo I have no clue why is my new 4GB basically useless, any suggestions? And I tried changing RAM slots yes.

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✔ Best Answer
December 30, 2017 at 07:02:26
It appears the 4GB stick isn't being properly detected. Where are you getting this 12GB / 7.15GB info from? Here's some various memory info from the motherboard manual:

***********************************************
- 4 x 1.5V DDR3 DIMM sockets supporting up to 32 GB of system memory
* Due to a Windows 32-bit operating system limitation, when more than 4 GB of physical
memory is installed, the actual memory size displayed will be less than the size of
the physical memory installed.
- Dual channel memory architecture
- Support for DDR3 1600/1333 MHz memory modules
- Support for non-ECC memory modules
- Support for Extreme Memory Profile (XMP) memory modules

Make sure that the motherboard supports the memory. It is recommended that memory of the
same capacity, brand, speed, and chips be used. (Go to GIGABYTE's website for the latest supported memory speeds and memory modules.)

Dual Channel Memory Configuration
This motherboard provides four DDR3 memory sockets and supports Dual Channel Technology. After the
memory is installed, the BIOS will automatically detect the specifications and capacity of the memory. Enabling Dual Channel memory mode will double the original memory bandwidth.
The four DDR3 memory sockets are divided into two channels and each channel has two memory sockets as following:
Channel A: DDR3_2, DDR3_4
Channel B: DDR3_1, DDR3_3
***********************************************

Which slots do you have the memory installed in? It appears you have 8GB+4GB. I don't know if you can enable dual channel with two different size memory sticks. Try different slot configurations - 2+4 or 1+3 will give you single channel; 1+2 or 3+4 might give you dual channel.

message edited by riider



#1
December 29, 2017 at 11:35:01
Do you have Win7 Home Basic? There's a limit of 8GB for that version.

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#2
December 29, 2017 at 12:04:42
Is your video sharing the memory?

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#3
December 29, 2017 at 13:37:18
"my Motherboard can support it I checked"

Post the make/model of your motherboard so we can check for ourselves. More details about the RAM would be helpful too - speed, voltage, etc.

message edited by riider


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#4
December 29, 2017 at 20:30:13
The limit on RAM for Windows 10 Home 64 bit is 128GB, so that isn't your problem. See the link below for RAM capacities.

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us...


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#5
December 29, 2017 at 21:31:56
Not sure where Win10 is coming into this situation? OP says Win7 x64, which is 8GB/16GB/192GB: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/li...

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#6
December 29, 2017 at 21:32:29
If you have Windows 7 check your memory limitation:
https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/li...

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#7
December 30, 2017 at 03:10:02
Motherboard is Gigabyte P85-D3, Ram speed 1600Mhz. And I couldnt find the voltage. riider.

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#8
December 30, 2017 at 03:10:53
Razor, I got Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit

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#9
December 30, 2017 at 03:12:40
Btw, even when I had only 8GB RAM installed it also said (7.15 Usable) next to it, now I got 12GB installed and it still says (7.15 Usable). If this makes things a bit clearer, idk.

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#10
December 30, 2017 at 07:02:26
✔ Best Answer
It appears the 4GB stick isn't being properly detected. Where are you getting this 12GB / 7.15GB info from? Here's some various memory info from the motherboard manual:

***********************************************
- 4 x 1.5V DDR3 DIMM sockets supporting up to 32 GB of system memory
* Due to a Windows 32-bit operating system limitation, when more than 4 GB of physical
memory is installed, the actual memory size displayed will be less than the size of
the physical memory installed.
- Dual channel memory architecture
- Support for DDR3 1600/1333 MHz memory modules
- Support for non-ECC memory modules
- Support for Extreme Memory Profile (XMP) memory modules

Make sure that the motherboard supports the memory. It is recommended that memory of the
same capacity, brand, speed, and chips be used. (Go to GIGABYTE's website for the latest supported memory speeds and memory modules.)

Dual Channel Memory Configuration
This motherboard provides four DDR3 memory sockets and supports Dual Channel Technology. After the
memory is installed, the BIOS will automatically detect the specifications and capacity of the memory. Enabling Dual Channel memory mode will double the original memory bandwidth.
The four DDR3 memory sockets are divided into two channels and each channel has two memory sockets as following:
Channel A: DDR3_2, DDR3_4
Channel B: DDR3_1, DDR3_3
***********************************************

Which slots do you have the memory installed in? It appears you have 8GB+4GB. I don't know if you can enable dual channel with two different size memory sticks. Try different slot configurations - 2+4 or 1+3 will give you single channel; 1+2 or 3+4 might give you dual channel.

message edited by riider


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#11
December 30, 2017 at 08:01:29
Razor2.3

My mistake on the Windows 10 thing. Too late last night.


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#12
December 30, 2017 at 08:48:54
There's not many reasons why Windows would refuse to use detected memory. It's generally either the BIOS doesn't allow it, the memory addressing doesn't allow it (32-bit vs 64-bit), or Windows is configured to not use it.

The latter can be because of licensing (Starter vs Home vs Pro), or because the user told Windows not to use more than a certain amount. It's there to help developers generate low memory conditions for testing. If enabled, you can disable the limit by going to Start -> Run -> (type) msconfig -> Boot -> Advanced options -> (uncheck) Maximum memory: -> OK your way out of the application, and reboot.

If it's not that, I'd suspect the BIOS.

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#13
December 30, 2017 at 20:00:51
"I got Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit"

Are you 100% sure? Right click on My Computer, then click Properties. The version will be found there.

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#14
December 31, 2017 at 15:38:49
Riider, yes, im 300% sure, but anyways guys the kind guy that worked in the shop that sold me the card checked it all carefully and told me atleast the motherboard was the problem, they gave me my money back anyways :P Thanks for helping and taking the time to solve my problem guys :D

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