Solved Where could I find a 400w low profile PSU?

June 11, 2017 at 08:55:07
Specs: Windows 10
I bought a used PC and to upgrade it, I need a low profile psu aat 400w, but I acn't find any that are affordable.

Someone knows where I could find one (I live in Canada)


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✔ Best Answer
June 11, 2017 at 10:35:57
"I have the M81 not M91"

That was MY typo...it's been corrected.

Does the power supply calculator tell you how many +12v rails you should have? Does it tell you what the amperage ratings should be on the +12v, +5v, & +3.3v rails? Does it tell you whether you should have active or passive PFC? Does it tell you whether an 80 Plus efficiency rating is needed? Of course not, that's why those calculators are virtually useless.

If your motherboard will fit in a standard ATX or mATX case, you'd be better off gutting the Lenovo & transferring everything over, that way you can use standard parts. Or better yet, start from scratch & build something decent.



#1
June 11, 2017 at 08:56:19
Sorry for the typos, but a psu at 400w, not aat 400w and I didn't want to say acn't , but can't.

message edited by Chris1101


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#2
June 11, 2017 at 09:37:35
AT power supplies are from a LONG time ago. What you likely have is some sort of ATX PSU. There is no "low profile" but there are several different form factors - micro ATX, mini ITX, SFX12V, TFX12V, etc. Post the make/model of the computer you bought & we might be able to help. Also, wattage is not the most important spec to look for when choosing a PSU. What wattage PSU do you currently have & why do you feel you need 400W? BTW, if you bought a SFF (small form factor) computer, you will limited choices in PSUs, graphics card, & other add-in cards.

EDIT: the table of the right gives dimensions: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power...

message edited by riider


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#3
June 11, 2017 at 09:40:46
The AT is just at 400w, I was just correcting the typo, but I need a 400w psu b/c I tried all the psu calculators that I could find and they all said that the recommended wattage is around 380w.

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#4
June 11, 2017 at 09:41:33
The computer I bought is the Lenovo Thinkcenter M81

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#5
June 11, 2017 at 09:43:06
I think it would be a SFX12V psu or a CFX12V, but I'm not sure...

message edited by Chris1101


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#6
June 11, 2017 at 09:46:22
Do NOT trust power calculators. Also, as I stated, AT power supplies have NOT been used in a LONG time. ATX begin in the mid-90's & have been the standard ever since. You have some form of ATX PSU but we can't help you if you don't provide the info we need. What is the make/model of the computer you bought? Or is it a custom built PC?

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#7
June 11, 2017 at 09:51:09
as I said, the AT is NOT the type of psu I search, it's the correction of a typo, and I already said the model: Lenovo Thinkcenter M81

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#8
June 11, 2017 at 09:52:15
Stop calling it AT.

https://support.lenovo.com/us/en/so...

Notice that there's a type number, that's important as well. Can't help without having ALL the info. If your type number isn't listed in that link, post the correct number.

message edited by riider


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#9
June 11, 2017 at 09:57:36
7518,
written on the pc

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#10
June 11, 2017 at 10:01:48
GOD DAMN I DO NOT CALL IT AT, I just say that In the question, I made two typos: the first was aat when i wanted to say at, like the word I'm going at grandpa's house and acn't instead of can't.

The number I gave you is the number written on the PC.

message edited by Chris1101


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#11
June 11, 2017 at 10:02:51
Here's the link of my model: https://www.cnet.com/products/lenov...

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#12
June 11, 2017 at 10:03:25

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#13
June 11, 2017 at 10:16:54
"7518"

https://support.lenovo.com/us/en/so...

That makes it a SFF PC which will severely limit your upgrade paths. You must use low profile cards plus there will be minimal choices in SFF PSUs. I also read that if the M81 was made after 2012, a special "ATX to Lenovo" adapter is required. It appears you need a TFX or TFX12V unit. Check the dimensions of the one you have, it should be 175mm x 85mm x 65mm, roughly 7" x 3.4" x 2.5".

What makes you think you need a 400W PSU? Were numerous upgrades made? Better CPU, more HDDs, gaming graphics card?

message edited by riider


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#14
June 11, 2017 at 10:25:44
I have the M81 not M91, but I WILL do multiple upgrades: 8gb RAM instead of 4, adding a GTX 1050 ti low profile from msi and MAYBE changing the cpu for a Core i7-2600 @ 3.4GHz. And, like I said in the beginning, the psu calculators say around 370w of power needed, even if you said to not listen to them.

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#15
June 11, 2017 at 10:29:17
Yeah, a TFX12V psu looks like it.

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#16
June 11, 2017 at 10:35:57
✔ Best Answer
"I have the M81 not M91"

That was MY typo...it's been corrected.

Does the power supply calculator tell you how many +12v rails you should have? Does it tell you what the amperage ratings should be on the +12v, +5v, & +3.3v rails? Does it tell you whether you should have active or passive PFC? Does it tell you whether an 80 Plus efficiency rating is needed? Of course not, that's why those calculators are virtually useless.

If your motherboard will fit in a standard ATX or mATX case, you'd be better off gutting the Lenovo & transferring everything over, that way you can use standard parts. Or better yet, start from scratch & build something decent.


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#17
June 11, 2017 at 10:39:44
Thank you, I'll try transfering it into another normal case.

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