What else can 3 long beeps mean

June 6, 2014 at 10:24:44
Specs: Linux x86_64
I'm replacing a failed hard drive (Win7). (1)Take old out. (2)Put new in. (3)Remove graphics card to clean fan. (4)Put card back in. (5)Turn on ... 3 long beeps.

Tested altogether 6 sticks -- the two old, then tried 4 brand new.

Same 3 beeps, no video. Ideas?


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#1
June 6, 2014 at 10:28:36
Rather depends upon the make and model of your computer.

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#2
June 6, 2014 at 11:30:34
Intel 38DXBT. 3 long is manufacturer's ode for memory failure. But like I say, I've tested altogether 6 memory sticks with no change. Memory doesn't seem likely. But, can any other failure cause the board to THINK there is a mem failure? It happened AFTER I opened the box to replace the drive, so it seems like I should be the culprit, but I can't imagine what I might have done. Ideas?

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#3
June 6, 2014 at 11:46:57
Clean the RAM stick edge connectors with a pencil eraser and do the same for the graphics card. Check all connections too, it is easy to disturb something that is loose when working inside.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#4
June 6, 2014 at 14:23:38
Thanks for the suggestion -- very kind of you. I cleaned everything, twice. I even tried moving the two sticks from the blue slots to the black, but no good. Rats!

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#5
June 6, 2014 at 15:10:44
I assume Intel 38DXBT is the motherboard. Are you sure there's not a typo - seems a very rare board?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
June 6, 2014 at 15:25:12
You are correct. It's a DX38BT Intel "Extreme Series" desktop board. The model is old. The board is less than a year old though. It replaced another failed mono. I bought it so I could keep using the old processor but had to look around for it quite a bit.

Getting the graphics card out was difficult, and when it finally came loose, it came out with quite a pop. Do you suppose I could have broken something in the MOBO?


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#7
June 6, 2014 at 15:41:58
"Do you suppose I could have broken something in the MOBO?"
That went through my mind too. I guess it is possible although a bit unusual. Worth going over it with a watchmakers eye glass, looking for cracked tracks or bad joints in the area between the RAM and the graphics card.

I assume you've seen this manual:
http://downloadmirror.intel.com/150...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#8
June 6, 2014 at 16:17:34
Try one stick of memory only and then try a different one.
Check also for loose screws that may have gone under the motherboard and missing mounting posts under the motherboard causing a short or bad ground connection.
Check for removed or loose power and other connectors.
Look for pinched or cut wires along cards and along sharp edges.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
June 6, 2014 at 19:26:18
I've read it. That's how I found out what the beeps mean. But the memory itself is fine (I suspect). 6 different sticks tested with same results. I think I'll just replace it. I've been working towards that goal -- have a new board and a new graphics card, so I just have to buy a processor and some memory. This is just happening sooner than I'd planned.

Thanks for your help. While I wait for parts I may do a close inspection to see if anything turns up.

message edited by gnored


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#10
June 6, 2014 at 21:09:03
Yeah, it ought to be ram but you say you removed the video card too. Maybe it's a problem with the card or video ram. Make sure the card is in tightly. Try another card if necessary.

While fiddling around inside the case, you did have the power cord removed, right?


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#11
June 7, 2014 at 09:01:29
I tried a different video card -- no help. I did not try a different slot. So you suppose?

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#12
June 7, 2014 at 18:31:34
It still gives the same 3 beeps with a different card? If you have a card that works in another slot--even an old PCI card--you might try that. But I think we're back to a ram associated problem. You're sure all the ram you've tried is compatible with your motherboard?

You can try clearing the cmos/bios settings. Logically that shouldn't fix anything but sometimes it seems to help. With the power cord disconnected locate the 'clear cmos' jumper on the motherboard. (You may need to consult the manual.) Then jumper it from the standby to the 'clear' position. Leave it there for a second or two and then return it to the standby position. Then plug the power cord back in and start it up.

I asked above if you had the cord disconnected when you were working with it. That's important as power supplies will provide a small charge to the motherboard even when the computer is off--not enough to shock you but enough to damage a component if you remove or install it.


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#13
June 8, 2014 at 07:08:57
Probably won't help in this instance but I suppose you should turn off, remove from domestic power then hold the Power Off/On button in for abut 20 seconds. Sometimes the board remembers some bad situation and the above discharges it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#14
June 9, 2014 at 10:52:52
Well, I took out the old graphics card and put a brand-new out-of-the box card in a different slot. Nothing.

I can't get to the Bios setting at all. No response to F2 after the beeps, which is what the board manufacturer says should work.

Tried Derek's idea. Unplugged, held the Power Off/On button down 20 seconds. No change.

I located the Bios reset button and read about it in the manual, but none of the options were really any good (don't remember what they were, but all required using some kind of storage which, of course, is not possible ow. I can't even get through Post, so ...

I know all the RAM is compatible -- 8 gigs had been in the machine for about a year with no problems (I use it all sometimes, along with 100% of all 4 cores using a spatial analysis tool). The other 8 were cheaper, but it's campatible.

I think I'm going to give up. The last spatial problem I did took three 24-hour days to finish. I really need something faster, and this is an obsolete board that runs at about 2.4g or so. So I guess the case will get its new board, processor, and memory some time next week.

You guys have been great, and I really appreciate your responses. I hadn't tried about half of these things, and some of them might have worked. Thank you so much.

Gary


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#15
June 9, 2014 at 14:03:15
OK, thanks for popping back with the update.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#16
June 9, 2014 at 14:44:17
Totally off topic and unrelated of course... But...

FWI... on many buses in the UK (in days of olde, when they had conductors - and/or clippies as the "lady conductors" oft were called) three "beeps" (aka three bells) meant a full load; and a message to the driver not to stop to pick up more passengers. But OK to stop and discharge some of course...

These little snippets of information sometimes make life a little less boring and more interesting - as a rather famous Brit comedian/wit once observed; I think t was Goon show character actually.


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#17
June 9, 2014 at 19:36:39
What is this, a rice-a-roni commercial? You know:
Rice-a-Roni, the San Francisco treat (Ding, Ding)

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