Solved What are pros & cons for external & inbuilt hard drive PC?

Acer Aspire 5738dg-6165 core 2 duo t6600...
December 29, 2018 at 17:10:20
Specs: Windows 10, 4 gb
As far as Backup of files and folders is concerned, Is external hard drive far better than inbuilt hard drive for a PC? If YES and/or NO, in what aspects???
PLEASE DO HELP.



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✔ Best Answer
December 31, 2018 at 08:45:33
Internal drives:
- Does not protect data from ransomware
- Does not protect data from damaging power surges
- Does not protect data from fire
- Any physical damage to PC places backup(s) at risk
+ More likely to protect you from theft, assuming the thief thinks your PC is too big to easily steal
+ More likely to provide early warning of mechanical failure
+ Will be spun up every time PC boots, making sure the platters and heads can still move
+ Generally faster transfer speeds

External drives:
- Does not protect data from fire
- Does not protect data from theft
- Disk failures might not be exposed by SMART; first warning of disk failure might be disk dying.
- More parts to fail that might experience more wear and tear
+ Does protect data from ransomware, assuming drive is not plugged in
+ Does protect data from power surges, assuming drive is not plugged in
+ Provides physical separation from failed PC and backup(s)

Cloud backup:
- Monthly cost
- Slowest transfer rates
- Eats into any network data caps
- Might allow USA government to access data without consent, depending on vendor's geographic location
- Reliant on vendors to protect data / access to data
+ Depending on service contract, vendor might be liable for any data loss on their drives
+ No additional hardware required
+ Protects data from ransomware / malice
+ Protects data from any disaster / theft
+ Closest to "set it and forget it" option of the three

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#1
December 29, 2018 at 17:23:50
"If YES and/or NO, in what aspects???"
No.
Cover off, I don't even bother to bolt it in, just cable it up & sit it within the case in a safe position.

All my backup files that are really important, I also keep on a thumb drive. Easy to carry around when needed.


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#2
December 29, 2018 at 20:26:42
I use 2 external hard drives. Both are external powered USB and the power comes from a Kensington MasterPiece Plus power panel that I have been using for 20 years. It has the ability to sever power to each of those hard drive enclosures. I don't leave them powered all the time. That way if the worst were to happen to my tower, they are more or less protected. I also burn a DVDR after first setting up a new system. That can be used to perform a "factory restore" if required.

In addition to those drives, I also backup my very important/irreplaceable photos and self created product to CDR/DVDR. I only use flash media to transfer files.


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#3
December 30, 2018 at 08:09:35
The problem with HDDs is that they have moving parts & can fail. External HDDs are more likely to get banged around so you should use at least 2 different backup methods - backups of the backups. If you don't need portability, add an extra HDD inside the PC case. As for external storage, you can either get a dedicated external HDD or a docking station. You should also use DVDs for long term storage.

The advantage of a docking station is that you can backup to multiple drives & use multiple types of storage - standard 3.5" HDDs, 2.5" HDDs, or 2.5" SSDs. The drives can then be stored away securely. Here's an example of a dock: https://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod...


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#4
December 30, 2018 at 16:03:21
I use internal hard drives for back up for one main reason: They are always plugged in so I do not have to worry about forgetting to back up. I also make copies of important files to other computers on my home network for more safety.
The BIG disadvantage of this is that if you get a really bad infection it is possible that all of your drives on all of the computers can in theory at least become infected before you can stop it.
This is not for everyone, certainly not for critical business documents/files but for me it works.

A better method would be to have two or more external drives and switch them out daily so you can never loose more than one day overall. Then an off site (Cloud) based solution to cover that with an extra layer. DVDr's are really nice for anything that you would really be upset about loosing, maybe even a set of them in a bank vault would be nice to have.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
December 31, 2018 at 05:00:51
usb 2.0 reaches roughly 60MB/s (so you might bottleneck a HD/SSD), a WB blue 1TB for example reaches roughly 175MB/s.
usb 3.0/3.1 does about 640MB/s
SATA 3.0 reaches up to 600MB/s
For reference normal SATA SSD's (an 860 evo for example) reach roughly 520MB/s
and NVMe PCIe M.2 SSD's (like the Samsung 970 Evo NVMe PCIe M.2 1TB) in excess of 2000MB/s

Price/performance is not that great, sacrificing performance for mobility.
I would just use a SSD or spare HDD for backup, and just leave it plugged in, but thats just me.

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#6
December 31, 2018 at 08:45:33
✔ Best Answer
Internal drives:
- Does not protect data from ransomware
- Does not protect data from damaging power surges
- Does not protect data from fire
- Any physical damage to PC places backup(s) at risk
+ More likely to protect you from theft, assuming the thief thinks your PC is too big to easily steal
+ More likely to provide early warning of mechanical failure
+ Will be spun up every time PC boots, making sure the platters and heads can still move
+ Generally faster transfer speeds

External drives:
- Does not protect data from fire
- Does not protect data from theft
- Disk failures might not be exposed by SMART; first warning of disk failure might be disk dying.
- More parts to fail that might experience more wear and tear
+ Does protect data from ransomware, assuming drive is not plugged in
+ Does protect data from power surges, assuming drive is not plugged in
+ Provides physical separation from failed PC and backup(s)

Cloud backup:
- Monthly cost
- Slowest transfer rates
- Eats into any network data caps
- Might allow USA government to access data without consent, depending on vendor's geographic location
- Reliant on vendors to protect data / access to data
+ Depending on service contract, vendor might be liable for any data loss on their drives
+ No additional hardware required
+ Protects data from ransomware / malice
+ Protects data from any disaster / theft
+ Closest to "set it and forget it" option of the three

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