Solved Wattage of Power Supply for basic computing needs

May 6, 2016 at 12:18:03
Specs: Windows 7
I am looking for a desktop computer just for the basics, ie word, spreadsheets, internet, and some entertainment. What kind of power supply should I be looking for to handle this smoothly. I found one with a 220w power supply which seems low, but for what I am wanting to do may work out? Can someone guide me in the right direction?

Thanks!


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✔ Best Answer
May 8, 2016 at 04:49:21
Hi F1,

for a BASIC Desktop, performing BASIC tasks, 220w or 250w should be fine.

You mention 'smoothly' by which I suspect you are referring to the video being displayed.

Many factors, not related to the psu, can cause a very brief hang sometimes.
I have seen such on modern state of the art desktops..

Good Luck - Keep us posted.



#1
May 6, 2016 at 13:50:01
Are you going to build a system from scratch? You should look for a power supply that has a single +12v rail of at least 30A, active PFC (power factor correction), 80% plus efficiency rating, & a 3 year warranty or better.

A very popular & very reliable power supply is the Corsair 430W. It gets recommended in these forums all the time. It can usually be found for about $20-25 after rebate. You're in luck: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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#2
May 6, 2016 at 14:00:32
I am more trying to find out what ones are suitable in stock ones. I don't want to have to build from scratch, but a lot of the specs you find for computers on dell, hp, lenovo, and other sites don't mention anything about the power supply. I have read some threads where people will buy one of these with a good processor and such and the power supply isn't enough to handle it and it shuts off. I want to make sure the power supply in the stock computer I am getting is enough to handle the basics as it seems when you do a power supply test online it is basing it on full capacity of the setup you have running and I should be no where near that doing just basic stuff.

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#3
May 6, 2016 at 17:05:20
"I am more trying to find out what ones are suitable in stock ones"

Power supplies come in different form factors, they're not a one-size-fits-all thing. Standard ATX is the most common type; like the Corsair 430W that I linked to in my other response, but there's also micro-ATX, TFX, ITX, & a few others. You'll have to figure out which type you need. All computers use one of these types but some manufacturers (Dell, HP, etc) occasionally use proprietary wiring.

As far as wattage goes, there should enough to power all the components + extra for possible upgrades + extra for a safety buffer. The hardware components will only consume as much power as they need so don't worry that you can have too much wattage...not having enough is when you should worry. For example, if your system is calculated at 200W, a 220W PSU doesn't allow for either upgrades or safety. It would hold up for a while but since it would be running at almost max capacity, it would probably die an early death. A 400-500W unit would allow plenty of breathing room.

No matter which type you need, you should still make sure it has a single +12v rail, active PFC, 80 plus certified, good warranty.


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Related Solutions

#4
May 6, 2016 at 21:11:16
Since you are looking for a factory machine, you can go to HP's web site and after you select the one you want, they often have a customize button which will take you through the available options and allow you to upgrade certain areas. Usually there are two or three choices on many stock items and it tells you how much more for each option. This may not be offered for the base models but as long as you are going up a notch or two then you should see the customize option.
Another option is to purchase it at a retail store that will allow you to do the upgrades and they will install them for you. This way also you can add more memory or upgrade the power supply to the Corsair model riider and others here recommend for the level machine you are interested in.
Finally, you can choose the components you want and have the retailer build it for you.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
May 7, 2016 at 13:06:29
To add to the above excellent responses many computers sold today are slim line, or small form factor. These use NONE ATX power supplies. You should be able to find out what form factor and wattage the power supply is, in the unit you are considering.

If you post model numbers we can probably help you with that too.


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#6
May 8, 2016 at 04:49:21
✔ Best Answer
Hi F1,

for a BASIC Desktop, performing BASIC tasks, 220w or 250w should be fine.

You mention 'smoothly' by which I suspect you are referring to the video being displayed.

Many factors, not related to the psu, can cause a very brief hang sometimes.
I have seen such on modern state of the art desktops..

Good Luck - Keep us posted.


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#7
May 8, 2016 at 13:11:15
If you know what parts are in your machine, you can always do a so-so test with an online PSU calculator
Like this one
http://outervision.com/power-supply...
or this one
http://www.coolermaster.com/power-s...
or this one
http://powersupplycalculator.net/

nuFF3


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#8
May 8, 2016 at 20:55:44

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#9
May 9, 2016 at 08:46:49
I went with this setup. I don't need windows 10 and this had really good reviews and it is a slimmer design.

http://www.amazon.com/Acer-AXC-605G...

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00RPJOQQ8...

This should fit my needs just fine for basic computing. The other one was just a little too much.

Thanks for all of your help!


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#10
May 9, 2016 at 09:58:17
In other words, your question really had nothing to do with power supplies? Slim designs are generally a poor choice due to the size limitation when it comes to upgrades. And not long after connecting it to the internet, Microsoft will try to force Windows 10 down your throat so if you don't want, you'd better find out how to block it.

http://ultimateoutsider.com/downloads/


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#11
May 9, 2016 at 10:04:23
Well it was in the beginning because I wasn't sure what I wanted, but after I researched some more and looked through other post on this forum I realized what I needed wasn't necessarily anything I wanted to upgrade in the future since I am not a gamer or photo editor by any means and don't watch movies on it. I just had heard that some slimline lenovos and other computers came with a less than capable power supply, but after researching and reading this should be plenty for me. Is that site something I can use to block microsoft from trying to get me to upgrade?

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