Solved Waht is the benefit of doubling my computer's memory

Hewlett-packard / PAVILION
April 2, 2018 at 16:47:35
Specs: Windows 7, Intel Pentium D 925
I am trying to improve the performance of my computer without spending a fortune. What can I expect in performance/speed if I doubled the memory the computer. I have two slots for memory cards and only one is being used.

Thanks a bunch, Uncle Dewey


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✔ Best Answer
April 2, 2018 at 20:44:05
If you go from 2 to 4GB on a 32bit machine or 4 to 8 GB on a 64bit machine then the difference is noticeable generally but going from 8GB to 16Gb or more may only be noticeable when you are running memory hungry programs.
You will gain as much or more going from a conventional hard drive to an SSD drive once you have achieved enough memory based on your system and uses.
Note also that if you are running a Pentium D 925 (even overclocked) then you will never be fast by today's standards.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
April 2, 2018 at 18:00:14
"What can I expect in performance/speed if I doubled the memory the computer"
More speed in every aspect, from boot to loading & running programs.

Probably eliminate lag, when running online video's.


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#2
April 2, 2018 at 18:04:12
Generally you add RAM to increase speed. Let us know how much RAM you have already and give an idea what sort of things you do on your computer. Also let us know whether you have a 32 bit or 64 bit machine.

Mostly adding RAM is beneficial unless you already have a stack of RAM or you don't do a great deal on your computer. It is important that you get the correct type.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
April 2, 2018 at 19:32:57
Please post your system specs. We need to know how much RAM you have, the speed of the RAM (DDR2-533, DDR2-667, DDR2-800, etc), which OS you're running, & whether it's 32-bit or 64-bit.

General recommendations for reasonably good performance:
- 32-bit OS, use 2-4GB.
- 64-bit OS, use 4GB or more.


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#4
April 2, 2018 at 20:44:05
✔ Best Answer
If you go from 2 to 4GB on a 32bit machine or 4 to 8 GB on a 64bit machine then the difference is noticeable generally but going from 8GB to 16Gb or more may only be noticeable when you are running memory hungry programs.
You will gain as much or more going from a conventional hard drive to an SSD drive once you have achieved enough memory based on your system and uses.
Note also that if you are running a Pentium D 925 (even overclocked) then you will never be fast by today's standards.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
April 2, 2018 at 23:46:00
You all seem to have forgotten that more RAM also allows you to run multiple programs simultaneously instead of having to close one in order to free up memory to open another.

For multitaskers that's important.


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#6
April 3, 2018 at 10:24:07
My Friends,

The specs are:
OS Name Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium
Version 6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601
Other OS Description Not Available
OS Manufacturer Microsoft Corporation
System Name NELSON-PC
System Manufacturer Hewlett-Packard
System Model 500-281
System Type x64-based PC
Processor Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-4130 CPU @ 3.40GHz, 3392 Mhz, 2 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)
BIOS Version/Date AMI 80.20, 10/31/2014
SMBIOS Version 2.7
Windows Directory C:\Windows
System Directory C:\Windows\system32
Boot Device \Device\HarddiskVolume2
Locale United States
Hardware Abstraction Layer Version = "6.1.7601.17514"
User Name NELSON-PC\Duane Nelson
Time Zone Pacific Daylight Time
Installed Physical Memory (RAM) 4.00 GB
Total Physical Memory 3.91 GB
Available Physical Memory 2.33 GB
Total Virtual Memory 7.81 GB
Available Virtual Memory 5.12 GB
Page File Space 3.91 GB
Page File C:\pagefile.sys

Uncle Dewey


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#7
April 3, 2018 at 11:15:43
This might be helpful as well: https://support.hp.com/us-en/docume...

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#8
April 3, 2018 at 13:21:41
You would get better value for money by installing an SSD. If money is no object do that and double the RAM.

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#9
April 3, 2018 at 13:44:27
I did check a new hard drive and opted for a hybrid IDed as SSHD from Seagate--it was about $75 versus $275 for a SSD.

Uncle Dewey


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#10
April 3, 2018 at 21:26:38
You would have been better off keeping the hard drive for storage and adding one of these SSD's:
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod...

The hybrid drives are not the best solution. Adding a better SSD for about the same price and keeping the old drive if it is good is a better solution and gives you more flexibility and control. The hybrid drives are as far as I know using the SSD parts as more of a buffer for commonly used files rather than two distinct drives that you can control what is installed and saved where.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
April 4, 2018 at 09:42:44
The SSHD hybrid is 1tb at $75, while the SSD is around $300--I opted for the lesser price as it is speedier then the drive I replaced. The drive I replaced is also 1tb and I now use as a backup hard drive.

Thanks for your interest. Uncle Dewey


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#12
April 4, 2018 at 20:41:08
Your choice, my preference is for a fast SSD drive 240-250GB for the operating system and programs and a 1TB Western Digital Black series drive for storage only. I typically reuse an older hard drive internally for back ups on automatic. I find WD drives more reliable overall than Seagate drives where all of the failed drives I have ever had at home and at work have been Seagate and included in new computers from the factories. (now well over a dozen since my first Windows 95 era Gateway and my first drive replacement)
I currently use a PCIe SSD drive because it is significantly faster than my older SATA SSD drive and has less no issues between drive controllers and the chipset interfaces: PCIe vs the hard drive designed SATA interface.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#13
April 5, 2018 at 09:28:06
I think you have said adding memory would be helpful: "If you go from 2 to 4GB on a 32bit machine or 4 to 8 GB on a 64bit machine then the difference is noticeable generally but going from 8GB to 16Gb or more may only be noticeable when you are running memory hungry programs." since I have 64bit computer.

Using one drive for for the operating system and another for storage is beyond my knowledge as to how I would do that.

Thanks a bunch, Uncle Dewey


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#14
April 5, 2018 at 14:37:14
"The SSHD hybrid is 1tb at $75"
I go for the lower priced drives as well, they do everything I require.

"The drive I replaced is also 1tb and I now use as a backup hard drive"
That's the way I do it.


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#15
April 5, 2018 at 18:33:50
The reason I use one drive for operating system and programs and another for storage is that is you ever have problems with the primary drive and it is not repairable, I swap it out for a new one, Load the Disk Image I have saved on the back up drive, update with the most current back up, and everything is as before minus and updates or installs from the past couple of days. The storage drive is also backed up so it is also protected in case of failure or corruption.
With two drive is is not actually complicated, all installs are still on C drive so there is no change there and as long as the second drive and back up drive is not plugged in during Windows installation, it does not get complicated. After all is set, you just tell the system to relocate the documents and other personal folders to the storage drive and place short cuts on the desktop to find them easier.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#16
April 6, 2018 at 01:41:42
check out this short comparison between SSD, SSHD & HDD:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iB...

i5-6600K[delid]@4.8GHz/4.5GHz@1.385v | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2133@15-15-15-35 1T 2800MHz@1.37v
ASUS Z170K | Samsung 250GB SSD 850 EVO
MSI Armor RX 570 4GB@1414@1.243v/1930 BiosMod


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