Solved W7 NOT booting up again (tweaked out pins to reset mobo)

September 8, 2013 at 11:51:57
Specs: Windows 7, Intel Core I5 3.3
I have been grounding out the pins to reset the motherboard which is a Gigabyte GA-Z77-D3H. It did not restart for a few times. If I get another motherboard I am going to have to reinstall all of my software....what a PITA. Anyone have any suggestions before I throw up my hands. If I reinstall from the install disk and do a repair, will I lose all of my installed software? I would appreciate any advice you can throw my way. TIA

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✔ Best Answer
September 9, 2013 at 04:24:07
I also do not think it is a power issue but a USB device issue. Some USB drives can cause booting issues if they are plugged in at start up. You can leave it out until it is started, or you can try going into BIOS and making sure that the drive is not listed as bootable and see if that helps. You can also see if you can make your USB NOT bootable and see if that helps.

I do not think you have a temperature issue, but you can install HWMonitor and see your temperatures in real time. Typical temps should be in the 30C's at idle, 40C's in normal use, and 50C's under high use or gaming. Post all of the temps if you have questions on that after looking.
http://www.cpuid.com/downloads/hwmo...

One fan high in the rear set to exhaust is all you probably need. One front fan low in the front blowing IN (not out) is fine as an option. CPU and graphics fans are generally required. No other fans are generally needed and never use a side fan (disrupts air flow). These fans will not significantly add to the power requirements. Think of the air flowing into the case low in the front, flowing over the components as it goes back and up (convection takes it up anyway) and out the rear up near the top. Top mounted power supplies also add to this by exhausting the hot air as well. Bottom mounted power supplies do not do this as well so some cases allow a top mounted fan as well which can be added if heat becomes a problem.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
September 8, 2013 at 13:28:44
"I have been grounding out the pins to reset the motherboard"

I don't know what you mean by "tweaking out" or "grounding out"? I assume you mean "clearing CMOS" or "resetting the BIOS"? To do it correctly, the 1st thing to do is unplug the power cord. Then remove the side panel from the case, find the clear CMOS jumper (usually close to the battery), then move the jumper from its normal position to the clear position. Wait a second or 2 then move the jumper back to the normal position again, close the case, plug in the power cord & boot up.

Why do you feel this is going to fix anything? Did you change a bunch of BIOS settings & make the system unbootable? How about posting your complete system specs, power supply specs, & CPU temperature?


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#2
September 8, 2013 at 14:40:53
Thanks for posting. I realize I did not make my question clear...sorry but to answer your questions yes I cleared the CMOS by shorting out the pins...but possibly did not short out long enough as your post implies. I thought by doing this it would reset my bios in case if was corrupted. Here is the info you asked for minus the CPU Temp. I am not overclocking and I do vaccum out the dust from my Processor fan and power supply every 3 months or so. I realize this is not the fastest processor but understand the heat in these devices particularly during this hot spell. I will post the temperature the next time I boot up... I am reluctant to shut down for fear it will not boot up again. I know I will have to but later in the day or evening. I do appreciate your help.f
OS Name Microsoft Windows 7 Professional
Version 6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601
System Manufacturer Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd.
Processor Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-2500K CPU @ 3.30GHz, 3701 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)
BIOS Version/Date American Megatrends Inc. F13, 5/11/2012
SMBIOS Version 2.7
Power Supply Thermalake TR2 500 Watt

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#3
September 8, 2013 at 14:51:49
With the case cover off, my cpu temp is from 40 to 42 degrees centigrade. Hope that helps you to make any suggestion you might have. Thanks again for your help. Loren Sr

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Related Solutions

#4
September 8, 2013 at 16:14:10
40-42C is a little bit high for your CPU at idle unless you are overclocking it, but not unreasonably high.
When you boot, typically, what do you see? Are you getting stuck when you get to Windows, or are you getting stuck before that? Can you boot into Safe Made? Can you boot into BIOS set up? These answers will begin to help us understand where your problem is. You have tried resetting your CMOS, but without telling us why you suspected the BIOS.
Also: Try booting to a bootable CD that you burn with Memtest on it to see if your issue is with your memory. Let it run through all tests.
Also: Try booting to a CD with your hard drive test utility or Seagate's Seatools and running the Long test to see if you are having hardware issues.
Post back these answers and results and we probably can help you further.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
September 8, 2013 at 16:16:14
I just realized you said Vacuum, you should not use a vacuum on the inside of your computer since the hoses can transfer a static discharge (ESD) to your components and fry something. In the future, use a can of compressed air for this purpose.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
September 8, 2013 at 18:23:41
So is the original problem that you'd attempt to start it up and it would take you several attempts before it actually did so? You cleared the cmos thinking that might help. Do you think it did?

Sometimes that behavior is due to bad capacitors. While you have the side panel off take a look at the capacitors, especiall those around the cpu. If any appear to be 'puffy' or have dried residue on top from leakage then that could very well be the problem.


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#7
September 8, 2013 at 18:37:34
I don't know if it helped or not. The last time I booted up, a couple of hours ago, it was OK. I do not see any puffed up capacitors or dried residue on top.

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#8
September 8, 2013 at 18:39:52
Thanks for the heads up. I have been vacuming my PC for a few years...about every 4 months or 6 months but have not had issues with static electricity thus far but your advice makes sense. And why take a chance. Thanks

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#9
September 8, 2013 at 18:57:49
Not overclocking. When this first happened I did boot up in Safe Mode because it stopped withe the Windows Welcome Screen. Later it started stopping at the Bios screen. I will have to see if it reboots again next time. One thing I have noticed, I have lately added another external USB hard drive. The latest external is a WD 2 Terrabyte size and I think it may add to the problem. Possibly draining off too much power from the CPU. I am speculating because once when it did not boot up I disconnected the WD External and it booted up. But I am not sure this is contributing, just suspicious. I am going to have to create a bootable cd with Memtest on it and run it over night to see if I learn anything. At least I can let you know and you can maybe point to the problem. I have Sea Tools and will first try that. I will get back to you guys tomorrow.

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#10
September 8, 2013 at 20:18:47
I don't know what is happening but I rebooted successfully 6 times in a row and things seem to be normal. I do not have the extra external hard drive plugged in so I will plug it in and see if that makes a difference. I will post results here.

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#11
September 8, 2013 at 20:33:29
OK...after connecting the WD external drive and rebooting the screen froze at the BIOS screen. I then disconnected it and Windows continued to boot up. Do you think my power supply is too small for the devices I have? I currently have 2 usb external drives, 3 hard drives and a cd rom drive plus speakers connected to my PC but its source has a separate 120 volt plugged into a power strip. What is your thinking about this. I have not been able to create the Sea Tools boot up disk yet.

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#12
September 8, 2013 at 20:39:08
Also I forgot, I have an extra 5" fan pulling air out of my computer mounted on the back side and another 5" fan mounted above my hard drives under the CD rom drive. There is also a fan on my graphics card and of course the fan over the cpu. I blow out the screen in directly behind the front of my computer. I believe it is to trap dust that would heat up the cpu and motherboard. I thought 500 watts was big enough for what I am running but maybe not. Your thoughts please. TIA Loren Sr.

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#13
September 8, 2013 at 20:43:52
The weather channel says it is 69 degrees in Carlsbad, CA but inside my home it is closer to 80 degrees. It was in the 90s today. This may have some bearing on my problem. Thanks again for your suggestions apologies for the many posts to give info.

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#14
September 8, 2013 at 21:44:54
If it's a heat problem you can leave the side panel off and use a box fan to blow air into the case. It's not a permanent fix of course but if you have no further problems then heat may be the reason.

If you feel you have too many USB devices hooked up you can use a powered hub and connect the devices there. My guess is if it is that new USB drive it's not a power issue but some hardware conflict between the new drive and something else. You can try a different port and see if that makes a difference.


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#15
September 8, 2013 at 21:55:05
Thanks I will try a different port.

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#16
September 9, 2013 at 04:24:07
✔ Best Answer
I also do not think it is a power issue but a USB device issue. Some USB drives can cause booting issues if they are plugged in at start up. You can leave it out until it is started, or you can try going into BIOS and making sure that the drive is not listed as bootable and see if that helps. You can also see if you can make your USB NOT bootable and see if that helps.

I do not think you have a temperature issue, but you can install HWMonitor and see your temperatures in real time. Typical temps should be in the 30C's at idle, 40C's in normal use, and 50C's under high use or gaming. Post all of the temps if you have questions on that after looking.
http://www.cpuid.com/downloads/hwmo...

One fan high in the rear set to exhaust is all you probably need. One front fan low in the front blowing IN (not out) is fine as an option. CPU and graphics fans are generally required. No other fans are generally needed and never use a side fan (disrupts air flow). These fans will not significantly add to the power requirements. Think of the air flowing into the case low in the front, flowing over the components as it goes back and up (convection takes it up anyway) and out the rear up near the top. Top mounted power supplies also add to this by exhausting the hot air as well. Bottom mounted power supplies do not do this as well so some cases allow a top mounted fan as well which can be added if heat becomes a problem.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#17
September 9, 2013 at 08:24:56
Thanks Fingers for your post. Very interesting. My fan is mounted on top of this medium tall case. My next step is to go into the BIOS and see if I can make the USBs not bootable. I believe I remember setting this to boot with thumb drive so I will definitely fix this.. My front fan is pointed towards the back to exhaust out the back. I have no side fan.
I have spent the morning getting all of my software serial numbers and other files copied to my smaller Seagate External USB drive. Thanks much for the help. When in the bios I will record all temperatures and post them.

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#18
September 9, 2013 at 08:33:23
Here is the HWMonitor results:

CPUID HWMonitor Report
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Binaries
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

HWMonitor version 1.2.3.0

Monitoring
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mainboard Model Z77-D3H (0x000001B4 - 0x00599EA8)

LPCIO
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

LPCIO Vendor ITE
LPCIO Model IT8728
LPCIO Vendor ID 0x90
LPCIO Chip ID 0x8728
LPCIO Revision ID 0x1
Config Mode I/O address 0x2E
Config Mode LDN 0x4
Config Mode registers
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
20 87 28 01 00 00 00 F3 10 00 00 00 40 80 00 00 00
30 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
40 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
50 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
60 0A 30 0A 20 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
70 09 02 00 00 04 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
Register space LPC, base address = 0x0A30


Hardware Monitors
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hardware monitor ITE IT8728
Voltage 0 1.06 Volts [0x58] (CPU VTT)
Voltage 1 3.36 Volts [0xAA] (VCC3)
Voltage 2 11.81 Volts [0xA4] (+12V)
Voltage 3 3.32 Volts [0xA6] (+VCC)
Voltage 4 0.90 Volts [0x4B] (vAXG)
Voltage 5 0.79 Volts [0x42] (CPU VCORE)
Voltage 6 1.52 Volts [0x7F] (DRAM)
Voltage 7 3.38 Volts [0x8D] (+3.3V)
Temperature 0 32°C (89°F) [0x20] (TMPIN0)
Temperature 1 25°C (77°F) [0x19] (TMPIN1)
Temperature 2 29°C (84°F) [0x1D] (TMPIN2)
Fan 0 1015 RPM [0x299] (FANIN0)
Fan 3 1092 RPM [0x26A] (FANIN3)
Fan PWM 0 0 pc [0x0] (FANPWM0)
Fan PWM 1 0 pc [0x0] (FANPWM1)
Fan PWM 2 0 pc [0x0] (FANPWM2)


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#19
September 9, 2013 at 11:40:29
I have external USB drives too but would never leave them plugged in all the time. I only plug them in if/when I need them. Why do you leave them connected?

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#20
September 9, 2013 at 12:05:13
I did not think there was an issue. I backup to the 2 Terabyte drive. I think I will disconnect the smaller one and only use it when necessary. Should lighten the load for my PC power usage also. Thanks for the suggestion.

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