Solved Video play back issue Followup

Wd Western digital caviar blue wd5000aak...
August 18, 2013 at 16:26:23
Specs: windows 7, 4gb
This is a followup to Video play back issue fixed itself:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
and
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...


OK so the other week I stated that I couldn't watch certain videos on certain sites for about a month that I was able to watch before. So last night I decided to see if the problem was still there. And after giving up (about 2 weeks) and not making any changes to settings, programs, OS, removing anything installed on PC. Nothing at all period. They now work. Any ideas?


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#1
August 18, 2013 at 17:11:14
Sunspots.

Seriously, that's a hard one to figure out. Do you have automatic updates turned on on your computer? Perhaps a new update was installed that fixed the issue, other that that I'm stumped. Maybe someone else has a better answer.


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#2
August 18, 2013 at 17:35:08
OK so you missed out on the details. The same videos I could watch on 3 other PCs I have. Even an 8 yr. old laptop that needs a video driver (not available). But not this 2009 Dell quad core. I'm stumped also. During the time of problems every update and OS was the same on all PCs. Did a Windows fairy fix it?

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#3
August 18, 2013 at 18:53:28
✔ Best Answer
I doubt anyone will be able to give you a concrete answer - I've seen problems come and go on computers before leaving you with no clue how they apparently fixed themselves.

Another possibility is that when you have an issue a certain amount of data can get stuck in the mobo chips (sometimes called flea power, although I've no idea why). If the computer was turned off for a while maybe something discharged away and was therefore not present when you next booted. For some oddball reason this is called flea power. See this link, which also gives info on how to discharge this residual power fully. It sounds like a fairy tale but it definitely can happen, especially when something like a Windows update gets in a loop:
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_f...

EDIT: Removed my wordy explanation and provided a link instead.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#4
August 18, 2013 at 20:20:46
I'm a simple man but I like details. People now a days just want a quick answer because they think they are too important to listen to the small stuff. Then when they need to fix something they only remember the last step, not how to get there. Talk all you want. If you took the time to answer, I got the time to read.

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#5
August 19, 2013 at 09:55:12
Thanks. The link provides all the same info that I'd originally put in off the top of my head. As it is an unusual suggestion (I didn't believe it myself at one time) then the link proves that it is not just some crackpot notion of my own.

It's no "fix-all" and it often makes no difference. It's just a thing that is easy to try, can do no harm, and at odd times "un-sticks" a computer.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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