USB Mouse Issue

Dfi / Lp nf4 sli-dr
February 10, 2009 at 22:08:13
Specs: Win.7beta.7000, Athlon 64 3500+ 2.2 @ 2.6
This issue has become a norm in every boot. At first it was extremely annoying but I've gotten used to it. The problem is my USB mouse (http://www.datavis.com/Toshiba-Optical-Tilt-Wheel-Mouse.html). I have to unplug it from the USB after Windows loads and re-plug it to get it to work each time. I've installed the software for it and it still does the same thing. I only got an error with TuneUp 2009 saying this device was having issues but device manager says its fine. It works great actually except for the ritual. This happens on all versions of Windows. I forgot to mention I've tried all USB ports on the Mobo. . . .

Any tips are appriciated. Oh and Jam, I was able to OverClock my CPU finally! Thanks for your help.

"The great mass of people ... will more easily fall victim to a big lie than to a small one" A.H


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#1
February 11, 2009 at 11:14:00
Try another mouse.

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#2
February 12, 2009 at 01:53:18
My Trust mouse does the same. first time i thought i broke it. then the batteries? but i have to keep unplugging my usb thing too. :-(

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#3
February 12, 2009 at 06:22:46
I haven't replaced it because of sheer aesthetic pleasure. Its color compliments the rest of my rig and I really think the issue is more motherboard driver or USB settings related. I've taken a look in BiOS at all USB settings including enabling USB MOUSE but to no avail. I'm just wondering if someone else has heard of this. All other USB devices do not do the same thing. I have a phone I charge and add files to that comes up fine. So I'm really curious on what the deal could be.

"The great mass of people ... will more easily fall victim to a big lie than to a small one" A.H


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Related Solutions

#4
February 12, 2009 at 06:32:40
If you look at the actual drivers in use they may be generic Microsoft drivers. Usually a drivers that was supplied by the manufacturer to Microsoft for certification will have the brand name, or part of the name, somewhere in the driver name, the provider, etc.

If you find this is the problem the solution would be to update the driver from within Device Manager.


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#5
February 12, 2009 at 07:33:33
That was my first though as well. It didn't work. I get "the best driver is already installed". I have the software that came with it but it only allows me to use the horizontal scroll feature and to assign a function for the middle button. When I installed it and rebooted I still had the same issue. There are no drivers on the disk itself.

"The great mass of people ... will more easily fall victim to a big lie than to a small one" A.H


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#6
February 12, 2009 at 09:20:04
USB devices may not work properly in all the possible ports you have available that you can plug them into, or your power supply may be failing and is not supplying a proper accurate 5v, or, rarely, you may have an IRQ sharing problem you need to fix.

See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

If the mouse (or keyboard) is corded, it is common for wires to get broken inside the cord, often right where it enters the mouse, after the mouse has been used a lot, or if the cord has ever been yanked on. If a broken wire still has it's ends touching each other within the wire's intact insulation, it still works but the connection is intermittant and you will experience problems. In that case, the mouse MAY work okay when the cord is in certain positions, and NOT work okay when it is in other positions, and symptoms MAY come and go if the cord is wiggled near where it enters the mouse.
In that case, the mouse will behave the same way when connected to another computer.

If the mouse is not a cordless one it should work with the generic USB mouse drivers Windows supplies - you just won't have as many features of it you can set settings for, and the scroll wheel feature or middle button will probably not work.

Rarely, I've seen that sometimes one USB device will conflict with another one and it's hard to determine why that is. I have one Logitech corded optical wheel mouse (model MB-J58) that does that when certain other USB connected devices are plugged in. When the Logitech mouse is conflicting with the other USB device, sometimes it works while booting, sometimes it doesn't - same goes for the device it is conflicting with. That particular mouse is a "combo" one that can be connected to either USB or to a PS/2 port via a simple USB to PS/2 adapter that came with it - it always works fine when plugged into a PS/2 port.

Try unplugging other USB devices you have plugged in while booting to see if your problem goes away when a certain thing is unplugged.
In my case one thing the Logitech mouse conflicts with is a USB connected adapter that allows you to use an actual RC transmitter you use for RC (radio controlled) model airplanes with a flight simulation program, RealFlight.
....

It's frequently important that you install the drivers and apps for a USB connected device properly, otherwise it will not work properly.

- you may need to install the drivers and apps for it BEFORE you plug it in
- you should have a minimum number of programs running when you install the software for it.
- Some software will NOT install properly until you disable the resident module(s) (the parts of them that are running all the time) of your anti-malware software in their configuration or Properties (e.g. a friend's cordless Logitech mouse's software would NOT install properly until I had done that recently).
- You may also need to temporarily disable some programs that always load when Windows first loads in msconfig - startup.
- it is frequently a BAD idea to point Windows to drivers for a device after you have first connected it, before you have installed the software for it, when it detects a device while booting, you allow it to look for drivers, and it doesn't find any and wants you to point to the location of where the drivers are - the device's software often does NOT install properly when you do that - CANCEL that, continue on to the desktop, and then install the drivers and associated apps using the proper installation program or download .

If you have installed the software improperly for whatever reason, you may need to un-install it in Add/Remove programs, AND delete the *.inf file it installed, before the software will install properly.

If the Un-install program is poorly made, sometimes un-installing the software does not remove the *.inf file for the device. Before you un-install the software, note the title for the device in Device Manager. If the device is found automatically according to the actual device's name while booting after un-installing the software for it the next time you boot, search for *.inf files with that text you noted in it. Your Folder Options - View settings must be set to show hidden and system files, and the advanced Search options must be set to also search for hidden and system files.
If you get more than one "hit" - examine the contents of the *.inf file and note the date of it (the date is often the same as other files that are installed when you install the software) and you should be able to determine whether it's the right one. Move the file (Cut, Paste) to a location other than in C:\Windows\inf .

With some software, the un-install of it leaves behind too much and you must also use something to clean up the registry entries left behind for it, and possibly delete other files left behind, before the same device's software will install properly.
OR - for devices that use the Windows Installer to install the software, rather than un-installing the software in Add/Remove Programs, it is oftem much more effective to use the "Windows Installer Cleanup Utility" (search for it on the Microsoft site if you don't have it, download it), run it, select the entry for the device whose software you want to install, and Delete the entry for it - that often works better than a poorly made un-install program, because it uses the info in the original *.inf file to un-install things.

If all else fails, if you have moved the *.inf file for the device, of if you install the software again and look at the *.inf file for it, or look at the orginal *.inf file within the installation software (you may be able to do that with WinZip) you can examine it's contents to see which files it installs and which registry settings it makes, and delete any files or registry settings that were left behind after an un-install of the software. Print the *.inf file if you need to.


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#7
February 12, 2009 at 10:08:40
The message about the best driver simply refers to the available drivers, not all drivers. Open up Device Manager> expand mice and pointing devices> Your mouse> driver> update driver. Use the driver file for the Toshiba mouse.

If no special driver is available you are out of luck.


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#8
February 12, 2009 at 14:08:45
Thanks fellas. Will try and repost.

"The great mass of people ... will more easily fall victim to a big lie than to a small one" A.H


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