USB device over current detected

July 3, 2011 at 08:49:24
Specs: Windows 7
the Alert shows up on a black scene and ask to remove the device and the system shuts down in 11 seconds. all usb plugs have been removed from the cpu and still does this what can I do to fix the problem.

See More: USB device over current detected

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#1
July 3, 2011 at 09:07:29

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#2
July 3, 2011 at 10:23:06
Tell us the make and model of your brand name system, or if you have a generic desktop system, the make and model of the mboard.

You can most commonly have your problem with a desktop computer.
Is that what you have ?
If yes...

If you have a new or fairly recent mboard...

the USB header(s) for two USB ports on your mboard probably has/have 9 pins on a double row ten position header - a pin is missing in one corner, 5 pins on one side, 4 on the other.
The fifth pin on the end in one of the rows is probably either for a second ground connection, or for overcurrent.
The use for that pin was never standardized - it can be for either use - but a particular mboard maker tends to keep the same use for that pin for all it's mboards.
If you have a generic desktop system, consult the manual for your mboard to see which use the 5th pin is for.

(If you have an older mboard, e.g. older than 5 years old, you may or may not have the USB header I described - where the pins are on a header, which position has no pin if one or two pins is/are missing, and what they are for was never standardized.)

You can have your problem when wiring from a USB port on the front of the case, or when the wiring from a USB port adapter that is a plate with ports in it that installs in a slot space on the back of the computer, is connected to a USB header on the mboard .
Most commonly, you have your problem when the USB header is connected to front USB ports on the case.

If the computer case has one, or more commonly two, front USB ports ports, if it has a fifth wire for one or both ports, the use for that connection may or may NOT be the same as on the USB header on the mboard. If the use for that 5th connection / pin is NOT the same, you will get a message from your mboard bios about overcurrent, even when there is nothing plugged into the front USB ports

Your computer case (or wiring adapter that installs in a slot space) probably has female wiring connectors for the front USB port(s) (or USB ports in the plate) that are one of...
- one piece for each port, 4 or 5 wires. Usually one has 4, the other 5, but sometimes both have 5, (or both have 4, in which case you would probably not be having your problem).
- or there may be individual female connectors for each wire for each port, 4 or 5 wires per port.
- or there may be a double row female connector with 9 wires and one pin hole blocked, to match up with a USB header that has one pin missing in one corner.

When you get the message you are getting from the bios, you MUST disconnect the connection to the fifth pin on the USB header.

E.g.

If the female wiring connectors have one one piece 4 wire female connector, and one one piece 5 wire female connector, all the wires one after the other,
- connect the 5 wire connector to the side of the USB header that has four pins such that the 5th wire for ground or overcurrent is not connected
- connect the 4 wire connector to the 5 pin side of the header so that the 5th pin for ground or over current is not connected

If each wire for each USB port has an individual female connector, DO NOT connect the 5th wire for ground or overcurrent to the 5th pin for the opposite use on the USB header.

If you have a double row female connector from a pair of USB ports with 9 wires and one pin hole blocked, to match up with a (specfically wired) USB header that has one pin missing in one corner, the uses of the other wires in the one piece connector must be compatible otherwise with the uses of the pins in the header they plug into, and......
if you're connecting both connectors to the same USB header, you MUST either.....
- cut the wire in the connector for ground or overcurrent,
or - insert a tiny screwdriver or stiff wire or similar into the opening on the connector for that 5th wire, on the wire side, to bend the tab on the metal end of the wire so that you can pull it out of the connector .
The same applies if you have two one piece 5 wire connectors from the USB ports connected to the same USB header - you must cut or pull out the 5th wire on one of the 5 wire connectors, plug in the other one such that the 5th wire does not connect to the fifth pin

Or if you have enough spare USB headers, connect the 5 wire connectors to the 4 pin side of more than one header, such that the 5th wire for ground or overcurrent is not connected.

The female connectors for the wires from the USB ports may be marked with one or more letters,. the ones for data also marked + or - .

The colors of the wire insulation on the wires from the USB ports was never standardized, but often
- usually red on one end is for +5v
- the fourth, and fifth wire if present, is usually black. If both the fourth and fifth wires are marked for Ground, then either of them can connect to the Ground connection on the USB header - usually that's to the fourth pin.
- the two wires between the red and first black wire (4th position) are usually a color and the same color with a white or black stripe - those are for data.

Usually the uses for pins in each row on the USB header are in this order - +5v, Data -, Data +, Ground, if it has a fifth pin, Ground or Overcurrent.
Usually the uses of pins in both rows are in the same direction, but on some headers on older mboards they are opposite .
..........

If you have a USB port adapter that is a plate with ports in it that installs in a slot space on the back of the computer,

- if it came with the computer when it was new, or came with the mboard if it's a generic system, the use of the 5th connection of a USB port on the USB header is compatible with the adapter's wiring - you can't have the problem you're having, at least not if the wiring has a one piece connector for two ports, or if it has two one piece connectors connected in the right direction to the right pins.

- if it didn't come with the mboard, the use of the 5th wiring connection of a USB port may or may NOT be the same as for the fifth pin on the header for a port.


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