Upgrading power supply

April 11, 2009 at 17:29:09
Specs: Windows XP Home, SP3, 1.25 Gb RAM
Hi.
I am trying to upgrade my 250W PSU to a 430W Thermaltake TR2 because i've upgraded my video card to an nvidia 6200, 512mb AGP. The problem is, I can't seem to get the darn thing to power on. After plugging in EVERYTHING, all i would get is a blinking amber light on the front, which according to the manual means that something is installed improperly, and there is no power. I've tried reinstalling the old PSU using the same connections (thinking that was the error), and it would start up normally. I would also just plug in the motherboard connections, and find a little green light that comes on. I realized that the white pin is missing from the original PSU's 20-pin motherboard connection, and was wondering if that had anything to do with it. I can't seem to find too many people who have this same problem, so I'm left to believe it just might be my unit. However, i would appreciate any input. Thanks

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#1
April 11, 2009 at 18:34:43
Some Dell machines have proprietary power supplies in them, meaning that a standard ATX power supply may not work. You may need one compatible with Dell machines. Compare the colors of each wire on the 20 pin connector with this pinout: http://skylab.org/~chugga/mpegbox/p...

Do you have the model number for the old power supply?

WinSimple Software


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#2
April 11, 2009 at 18:50:08
The 6200 is a very low end card. It doesn't require an aux 4-pin power plug connection so the PSU upgrade probably wasn't even necessary.

The white wire you mentioned is for the -5V....it's optional, some PSUs have it, others don't. Does your motherboard have a 20-pin main ATX connector or 24-pin? If it's 20-pin, make sure to unclip the +4-pin plug from the 24-pin plug on your new PSU & tuck it out of the way. And make sure the ATX12V 4-pin plug is connected to the board. Other than that, the HDD, optical drive, floppy drives, etc connections should be self explanitory.


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#3
April 11, 2009 at 18:58:04
Thanks for the quick response Rayburn.
The model number is ps-5251-2ds
It's just I've read a lot of accounts of people replacing the PSUs on Dimension 4600 with no problem. Does the proprietary issue vary by Dimension model or it can vary within a Dimension model?
What would you suggest if my particular machine uses a proprietary PSU?

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#4
April 11, 2009 at 19:06:13
Thanks also for your input, Jam.
i think the minimum power requirement for the 6200 is 250W, i just want to play it safe.
My motherboard has a 20-pin connection. The 24 pin connection on my PSU comes detached so theres no problem there. I already connected the other 4-pin connection on the mobo.
So what would be the worst-case scenario for a machine running an underpowered video card?

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#5
April 11, 2009 at 20:14:42
Upon googling your power supply model, I couldn't find that it is ATX, although I can't confirm. Did you check the colors of the wires against the pinout I linked to?

WinSimple Software


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#6
April 11, 2009 at 20:37:29
http://www.911forpcs.com/deposupfrs...
It says "20-pin ATX" on the motherboard pin connection, would that be it?

Anyway, my old PSU matches your pinout, except it doesn't have the white wire (18). My new PSU has everything, plus an extra (separate) 2x2 pin for a 24-pin motherboard.


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#7
April 11, 2009 at 20:45:21
I saw that page you linked to, when I saw it the first time, it crossed my mind that it could've been talking about the connector and not the pinout. But since the colors of the wires look the same on the old PS as the pinout I linked to, you can pretty much bet that you've got an ATX power supply.

So the old PS works even with the new video card installed?

WinSimple Software


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#8
April 11, 2009 at 20:57:52
Yes, it works perfectly, but i haven't run any games on it yet (I'm still wary of that). What do you think would be the worst case scenario if my old PSU can't handle the extra load?

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#9
April 11, 2009 at 21:49:13
Usually random restarts is the first sign. Then it just gets worse and finally you can then start hearing squeaking noises and stuff when you do moderately intense stuff with the PC. If you catch it in time, you can avoid damaging your motherboard and other components. There are some times when your PS can just go out suddenly without any warning at all, but that's more common with EMachines systems.

WinSimple Software


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#10
April 11, 2009 at 22:13:37
"What do you think would be the worst case scenario if my old PSU can't handle the extra load?"

You're putting way too much stock in the 6200....it's a low end card. It doesn't consume much more power than onboard graphics.

http://techreport.com/articles.x/74...


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