Upgrade PC

Custom / CUSTOM
May 7, 2010 at 08:20:12
Specs: Microsoft Windows 7, 3.108 GHz / 3327 MB
Does anybody see a problem in doing the following:

A friend has a Dell XPS 600. His motherboard clearly blew so I decided to get some parts together and build him a new one while keeping some parts if his old rig.

I'm only keeping his video, ram, hard drive and burner and getting all new Mobo, CPU, PSU and Case.

Could there be a problem? I'm thinking the video card COULD of went also but I won't know till i get new parts or put them in my computer to test them.

Thanks

Asus M4A78-EM
AMD Phenom II X2 550 @ 3.11
Patriot PC2-6400 4Gig
MSI R4830
Seagate 160Gig SATA
Seagate 320Gig SATA
External 1T


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#1
May 7, 2010 at 10:49:18
Brand name system cases often have one piece connectors for
- the front panel (power switch, power and hard drive leds, sometimes more)
- the USB header, usually for both of two front case ports
- sometimes other things

The wiring of those and which pin plugs into which hole in the female connectors won't necessarily work with the new mboard you install, and there may be no info in the Dell XPS 600 service manual about which wire is for what or which pin on the original mboard is for what.

You're usually better off getting a generic case that has individual, labelled, female connectors on the case wiring.
......

The power supply in brand name systems often is an el-cheapo model and usually has a minimal capacity, and that may not be enough for the new system.

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.

You can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS with the same capacity or greater.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
........

The existing ram may or may not be compatible with using it the new mboard.

See response 5 in this for some info about ram compatibilty, and some places where you can find out what will work in your mboard for sure:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...
Correction to that:
Mushkin www.mushkin.com

Once you know which module ID strings (part numbers) work in your mboard, you can get them from anywhere you like that has ram with those ID strings.

If you have brand name ram, it is usually easy to look up whether it's ID string is in a list of compatible modules found by using your mboard or brand name system model number.
If the ram is generic, that may be difficult or impossible.


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#2
May 8, 2010 at 07:07:52
Thanks for the quick reply. Very informative. I'll make sure to look into the parts I buy.

Asus M4A78-EM
AMD Phenom II X2 550 @ 3.11
Patriot PC2-6400 4Gig
MSI R4830
Seagate 160Gig SATA
Seagate 320Gig SATA
External 1T


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#3
May 8, 2010 at 07:50:20
In addition to the above your OEM version of Windows will most likely not run on a new motherboard.

How do you know his motherboard clearly blew?


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Related Solutions

#4
May 8, 2010 at 08:52:34
Many blown capacitors on the mobo. When pressing the power button, the computer does not stay on for more then half a second then shuts down.

Asus M4A78-EM
AMD Phenom II X2 550 @ 3.11
Patriot PC2-6400 4Gig
MSI R4830
Seagate 160Gig SATA
Seagate 320Gig SATA
External 1T


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#5
May 9, 2010 at 08:08:37
"....your OEM version of Windows will most likely not run on a new motherboard."

The Recovery disk(s) that came with the computer, or that you made in Windows by using a brand name supplied program to make it(them), may check the bios version of the mboard when you boot with it (or the first one) - if the mboard does not have that brand name's bios version, or possibly it might check whether the mboard is one of certain mboard models, the Recovery program quits.
......

Some mboards develop that problem - electrolytic capacitors were installed on them that were not properly made, and they fail eventually - the mboard manufacturer didn't know they were improperly made at the time the mboard was made.

This was the original bad capacitor problem - has some example pictures.
History of why the exploding capacitors and which mboard makers were affected:
http://members.datafast.net.au/~dft...

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/


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