Two HP printers, each with an empty cartridge

System manufacturer / System name
February 11, 2011 at 18:09:36
Specs: Microsoft Windows XP Home, 1.5 GHz / 1023 MB
I have two HP printers. Each has a color cartridge that the printer says is empty. And each printer insists that the color cartridge be replaced before it will proceed.

The two printers are OfficeJet Pro 8500 inkjet and CP1518 LaserJet.

Is there any workaround that would let me to use these printers for black on white printing? Seems to me that an empty color cartridge should not preclude monochrome (black) printing.

Is it common for printers in general to stop printing when a color cartridge is empty? Or is it just HP?

Thanks.

Steve

Steve


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#1
February 11, 2011 at 18:21:51
"Is there any workaround that would let me to use these printers for black on white printing?"

Almost always, No.The option to be able to do that has to be built into software for the printer .

I've never heard of an HP printer's software being able to do that.

Some of the older Lexmark two cartridge inkjet printers could do that.

"Is it common for printers in general to stop printing when a color cartridge is empty? Or is it just HP?"

Yes. No.

They make most of their profits from printers by you having to buy toner or ink cartridges for the printer from them.
However, you can often get toner cartridges or ink cartridges refilled locally, or on the web, or you can often buy already refilled original toner cartridges, for about half the price of the new brand name one, or you can buy new clones that cost far less, locally or on the web.


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#2
February 13, 2011 at 12:57:36
Thanks Tubesandwires for the advice.

One more question please: Do the cartridges "expire" after some period of time whether they are empty or not?

Thanks.

Steve


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#3
February 13, 2011 at 13:18:49
For toner cartridges ? I don't think it matters - the toner is dry .

For ink cartridges, you're supposed to use all the ink in them within a year or so after you buy them, or at least within a year or so after you first use them, but you can often be okay with them if the time is longer than that. The ink does tend to break down eventually if it's a pigment based ink rather than a dye based ink and form precipitate that is large enough to clog the nozzles in the print head.

I have been re-filling Canon's BC-20 and BC-02 black ink cartridges for years - they use a dye based ink - I've never had a problem with that ink breaking down, for bulk ink as old as 3 or 4 years or so. I've refilled the same cartridge as many as a dozen times before something else failed on the cartridge.
Most ink for Canon printers is dye based, except for the PG ink tanks and cartridges. I currently have a Canon printer that uses 4 CLI-8 and one PG ink tanks and I've refilled them all at least three or four times each.

Most cartridges for recent printers that are ink tanks have a chip that counts how many times it has been used, as well as detecting the ink level, and there is a maximum count for that after which the cartridge can't be used, but that's not a problem unless the cartridge is refilled, and places that refill them usually have a chip re-setter, or if you refill them yourself you can buy a chip re-setter cheaply.


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#4
February 19, 2011 at 13:59:19
One more question please . . . well, maybe just one more :)

I bought replacement cartridges for the CP1518 LaserJet. Ended up having to replace all three color cartridges. The odds that all three would run out of toner at the same time is about nil. How can they all run out of toner at the same time? Am I right to think there is a time limit that drives replacement? A need for HP cash flow? Surely there is toner still in at least one or two of those cartridges.

The three color cartridges are the ones that came with the printer new in late 2009.

Aggravates me.

Steve


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#5
February 19, 2011 at 14:42:31
"I bought replacement cartridges for the CP1518 LaserJet. Ended up having to replace all three color cartridges."

It has 3 cartridges, not 4 (one black) ?

"How can they all run out of toner at the same time?"

It depends on what you're been printing. If you print a lot of black, you have only 3 cartridges, they will probably have similar amounts of toner left.They may be more or less all out of toner at about the same time, they may not be.

What I would have done when the software is telling you all three need to be replaced is....
- use something to weigh each of the original ones, compare than to the new one.If the cartridges are identical that will give you an idea whether the other two have more toner in them.
- if the weights indicate there is still significant toner in the other two, un-install the HP software for the printer, install it again.

"Am I right to think there is a time limit that drives replacement?"

I have never heard of that for toner cartridges.
If they DO have a chip that keeps track of the total time the cartridges have been used,or the number of times they have been used, or similar, there would be visible electrical contacts (more than two) on the outside of the cartridges somewhere that connect to contacts in the printer when you install them, and in that case there are probably cheap chip re-setters available on the web.
If the total time the cartridges have been used is kept track of on the hard drive in the printer's software, which I doubt, un-installing the HP software and re-installing it should get rid of that info after the chips have been re-set.


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#6
February 19, 2011 at 16:27:57
Yes, there are four cartridges. I replaced the black last year.

When I bought this printer, I anticipated a good bit of color printing. Turns out that was not a good assumption and I have printed very little color stuff with it. Seems to me that the original color cartridges should have toner left in them.

When the printer decided the yellow cartridge was empty, it said replace that cartridge. It was not until I replaced the yellow that it said replace the blue. And then it wanted the red.

Don't think I have anything accurate enough to make meaningful weight comparisons between new and allegedly empty cartridges.

Steve


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#7
February 20, 2011 at 07:45:35
My Canon IP-4200 uses it's larger black cartridge for text, the smaller black one for images and photos. Perhaps yours uses the black one for text, all three color ones for black for images and photos.

At the very least it costs you less per page when you use a laser printer than it does when you use an inkjet printer.

Did you buy new HP cartridges or new clones or refilled ones ?


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#8
February 20, 2011 at 10:17:11
I bought new HP cartridges for both printers.

Most of my printing is text, pretty rare that I print images and never photos.

Thanks for your help with all this.

Steve


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#9
February 20, 2011 at 11:11:54
6 cartridges ??

You could have saved yourself a little or a lot of money by searching for and buying alternative cartridges or by having them refilled locally.

"Most of my printing is text, pretty rare that I print images and never photos."

You would probably be better off with a mono (black only) laser printer in that case.

Thanks for the thanks.


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