Turntable RCA outputs for the computer

March 6, 2011 at 01:39:04
Specs: Windows 7
hey,
im looking at getting a turntable that has an rca outlet and i need to plug it into my computer so i can sample from the vinyls on the turntable and save them onto my computer. so what do i need to plug rca cords into my computer?

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#1
March 6, 2011 at 01:41:06
a stereo mini plug to a y with 2 female rca's

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#2
March 6, 2011 at 01:50:10
could you link me some examples or something? bit of a noob

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#3
March 6, 2011 at 01:51:30
or maybe RCA to USB adapter with software such as Audacity (freeware) for the recording?

Alesis do a good one.

Edit: Look on Amazon ---->

http://www.amazon.com/Alesis-PhonoL...


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#4
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#5
March 6, 2011 at 13:18:20
XpUser4Real, those cables are good if you want to channel the audio from your PC into an amplifier or receiver of sorts.

The 3.5mm jack on a PC is an audio output port.

The OP has asked for a way they can take sound from a phonograph and send it to a PC to record or digitise samples.

The Alesis cable is exactly what is needed for quality phono-rips:

http://www.alesis.com/phonolink

There probably are cheaper options if you Google around, but if you live in the U.S the Amazon price is really good for what you get.


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#6
March 6, 2011 at 15:37:28
The 3.5mm jack on a PC is an audio output port.

I guess you have never seen a mic input which also serves as a line-in? Hmmmm, I use it all the time for importing cassette tapes, mixers etc and to my PC, I have no idea what you have on your PC.

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#7
March 6, 2011 at 16:21:43
Every sound card I have ever seen which includes the very first Sound Blaster card ever made back in the early 1990s had at least three 3.5 in sockets. One for Line In/Mic, One for Line Out and One for Speaker.

The only difference with current sound cards is that they have more speaker sockets for surround sound but they are still 3.5 inch sockets.

The RCA phone to 3.5 in plug would be the simplest and most reliable method to use as it avoids a further stage of conversion via USB. You just set your recording software to take its input from Line In.

Stuart


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#8
March 6, 2011 at 22:03:47
My apologies, I never considered the Mic input.



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#9
March 7, 2011 at 09:52:33
Do not use the Mic Input. Aside from the impedance being way off, all modern records use what is known as an RIAA eqaulization curve. The mic input will not compensate for this and the audio will sound horrible.

the device btk1w1 would be the simplest way to do it but you will still have issue with the audio sounding thin and tinny due to no RIAA EQ. you could doctor it up in an audio editing program like Audacity, but it would be trial and error.

The best method would be to run the phonograph into a phono input on a regular stereo receiver. All receivers/pre amps have the RIAA EQ built in. Then take the the recording output from the receiver and run it into your computer.


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#10
March 7, 2011 at 13:02:25
Do not use the Mic Input.
That is funny, I have mastered stereo midifiles to MP3 files through the mic/line input and they sound great, I'm really wondering if some of you have actually tried the inputs or if it is just reading and heresay.

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#11
March 7, 2011 at 16:33:56
When you say you've mastered through the mic/line input you were using the line if they we're MIDI or mp3. That is different from what I'm talking about.

I'm talking about using the mic input ( and respectfully the gain needed to drive a microphone signal) to drive a phono cartridge signal which as I decribed before is not the best way to do it.


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#12
March 7, 2011 at 16:53:40
no problems, there are adjustments on mic/line inputs, I have mastered from records to cassettes to video and have excellent quality. That's why I said...I HAVE DONE IT, and that's why I know it works, have you ever tried it?
Oh, I use Goldwave as my audio editing proggie, it's a real old version from my windows 98 days, and yes, it still works great in compatibility mode on windows 7.

When living in paradise you have to acquire many different types of income, so transfering records, etc is just another sideline I do besides my full time PC repair business.

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#13
March 7, 2011 at 17:49:04
Yes I have tried it and that is why I posted this information. The RIAA equalization is the biggest problem and leaves the audio in much need of bass enhancement.

Gold wave is a great program for editing. I was lucky and bought Cool Edit way back the the days when it was only $50. I was grandfathered in when Adobe bought it and turned it into Audition so I was able to upgrade for fairly cheap.


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#14
March 7, 2011 at 22:45:08
THX do you think you could post some links to the items you are talking about here:
The best method would be to run the phonograph into a phono input on a regular stereo receiver. All receivers/pre amps have the RIAA EQ built in. Then take the the recording output from the receiver and run it into your computer.



As for the mic input option im looking into it more deeply now.


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#15
March 8, 2011 at 07:29:14
Do a Google search for recording to a computer through a receiver. You will get plenty of hits.

But its really not hard at all. If you have a turntable, then chances are you also have a receiver you listen to it through. Just connect your stereo system the way you would normally listen to records. Then look on your receiver for recording outputs or auxiliary outputs and connect those to the audio input jacks on the computer.


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