Solved to hook up s-ata optcal drives

December 26, 2014 at 22:02:58
Specs: Windows 7
No 40 pin plug for my s-ata optical drives . I think? Do I just use just use s-ata cables? just leave the 40 pin slot open?

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✔ Best Answer
December 27, 2014 at 23:01:41
Do you need more than 6 SATA ports? I would use an add-on PCI card if you do rather than this IDE to SATA one. But 6 is enough for most people.


#1
December 26, 2014 at 23:04:01
A SAtA optical drive won't have a 40-pin connector.

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#2
December 26, 2014 at 23:13:32
SATA devices don't have a 40-pin data connector, only PATA/IDE devices have those.
Use a SATA cable and hook it up to one of the SATA ports on the motherboard.

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#3
December 26, 2014 at 23:37:06
Yeah, just leave the 40-pin IDE port open if you have nothing to connect there and as already mentioned use the SATA port for the drive.

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Related Solutions

#4
December 27, 2014 at 08:52:02
Is this a trick question?

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#5
December 27, 2014 at 10:15:58
but I am looing at a powered converter forty pined and pqoered with 2 sata coming out. now that would leave me the rest of my motherboard ports open .

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#6
December 27, 2014 at 11:23:47
not meant to be there is a converter.

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#7
December 27, 2014 at 11:25:07
the question is will it mess with bios.... you think?

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#8
December 27, 2014 at 16:16:06
This is going all over the place.
Please explain more clearly.
If it is a SATA drive then it has a slot for a SATA connector and no IDE connector (40 pin). Use it with a Sata cable. If the drive have an IDE connector then use that. If the motherboard does not have the IDE connector and you still want to use the drive, you need an add on card or an adapter. Any unused connectors should remain open and will be available if you ever need them for other drives. Most modern motherboards no longer have IDE ports, but for a few years, they did so those with legacy components could still use them, if you don't, don't worry about the port, its like your appendix if you don't mess with it and it does not get infected (the real one), its Ok to leave it alone.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
December 27, 2014 at 20:09:24
First; I like your "You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane."
board:nforce780i sli
I am have s-ata drives. on the MB I have 6 s-ata connections and the 40 pin ata.
on the market now is a powered converter. with that it plugs in the ata (40pin) and gives you 2 more S-ata ports for your disk drives leaving me all 6 sata MB ports for what ever. I guess what I was wondering how the bios will see that. sure will be updating the bios any way this one has been on the shelf for a couple years. hope I did not confuse ya to much. just wanted to see if it has been don before.
Thanks for your feed back.

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#10
December 27, 2014 at 23:01:41
✔ Best Answer
Do you need more than 6 SATA ports? I would use an add-on PCI card if you do rather than this IDE to SATA one. But 6 is enough for most people.

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#11
December 28, 2014 at 00:51:34
The SATA to PATA/IDE converter does not add 2 SATA ports.
The converter can be used in 2 directions:

1. MB (40 pin) IDE to SATA HDD, use the SATA connecter labeled "IDE to SATA HDD"

2. MB SATA to IDE HDD (40 pin on the HDD) use the SATA connector labeled "SATA to IDE HDD.


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#12
December 28, 2014 at 01:31:17
you are right. but leaves open the 2 out of the 6 on the board for more drives or what ever Yes they are meant for drives..
With this adapter you can convert IDE to SATA and SATA to IDE: it's bidirectional! It can be plugged into your drives or your motherboard. Can be used to upgrade an older computer, optical drive, or hard drive. Or, use it to make a newer drive backward-compatible! Package includes 12"/30cm SATA cable, power adapter cable, and adapter bridge. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...

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#13
December 28, 2014 at 01:53:44
There's no need to copy and paste the description. You sound like a sales brochure. Just say you were thinking about using it and post the link.

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#14
December 28, 2014 at 01:58:10
sorry the last post seemed like he understood wheat it did. my bad will not happen again

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#15
December 28, 2014 at 02:40:51
Not a big deal, but when it's posted like that it sounds like spam and sometimes they remove it because of that.

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#16
December 28, 2014 at 05:20:47
Two drawbacks of the converter:
First, it will be slower than a SATA port on the motherboard or add on card and be limited by the speed of the IDE port.
Second, It may not be fully recognized until Windows and it's drivers load so it may not be bootable.
I would use the onboard SATA ports until/if you need them, then I would use an add on card (as above) but not for a bootable device, for a storage drive, back up drive, or secondary optical drive if needed.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#17
December 28, 2014 at 05:33:50
funny part is it a $5 bill,, you know ,, That what I was concerned with was the bios, speed 1.5 gig a sec, I do remember the old days when you waited 3 minutes before you started worrying
they are designed for sata optical that are attached
to the mother board.
what the heck 5 bucks I'll get back to you.. thanks

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#18
January 1, 2015 at 11:12:24
You have unused SATA ports & a SATA optical drive, why would you even consider using a converter? It's a complete waste of time & money, even if it is only $5.

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