Solved Time for a new laptop?

June 30, 2015 at 13:10:25
Specs: Idk, Idk
NTI Backup Now EZ says "There is no hard disks in your PC to restore". Laptop doesn't boot at all with or without the Toshiba back up drive plugged in. Time for a new laptop?

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✔ Best Answer
July 1, 2015 at 04:55:22
Well, the hard drive's probably the third easiest part to replace, so there's that. Look at the bottom of your laptop for a symbol that'll either look like a cylinder, or 3 disks stacked one over the other. Remove that panel, remove the screws holding the HDD in, push the HDD away from the connector, then lift out, and remove the cradle from around the HDD. Congratulations, you just removed the HDD. Installing is the reverse of that. Then, it's just a question how good your backups are.

For the replacement drive, it needs to be 2.5", and it needs to be some variation of SATA / Serial ATA. I'd recommend solid state, because SSDs handle movement better than traditional disks; I'd recommend a 250GB drive, since that's what your old drive was.

Or just skip the hassle and get a new laptop. Lenovos used to be built like a tank, but I can't recommend them these days.

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#1
June 30, 2015 at 13:18:11
"Time for a new laptop?"

You didn't list a make/model or any specs, so it's difficult to say whether you should get a new laptop or not. It's possible that all you need is a new hard drive.


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#2
June 30, 2015 at 13:29:31
It's a Lenovo that came with Windows Vista, but is probably running on Windows 7. I don't know much else.

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#3
June 30, 2015 at 13:34:42
You need a new hard drive. Whether a new laptop is attached to the drive is more dependent on your satisfaction of the laptop.

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message edited by Razor2.3


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Related Solutions

#4
June 30, 2015 at 13:40:06
That's a good point. Definitely happy with it. More research to do.

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#5
June 30, 2015 at 16:20:28
After you purchase a new hard drive you will need recovery disk set. If you did not make the set that was available when the machine was new and did not make an image of the hard drive (another option for recovery). then you will either need to get from the mfg. a recovery disk set which should be available for a small fee for your system or a new Vista or Windows 7 install disk. If you go with a new install disk then you will have to download all of the drivers for the machine as well. If it came with Vista and you decide to go with Windows 7, make sure that drivers are available for it first.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
June 30, 2015 at 17:53:51
I found the original box with owner's manual. Figured out how to run hard drive test. Surface scan test failed. I tried to update my specs, but it hasn't shown up on this thread. It is a Lenovo G350, 4446-24U. Still not sure about which Windows it is using, other than I know I up graded from Vista and I have no idea about the RAM or anything else. Since the cooling fan runs really noisy, should I go ahead and replace it, too? Thanks for all of the help so far!

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#7
June 30, 2015 at 18:48:52
That's running a little old, especially if you're planing to put Windows 10 on it. That said, a new SSD 256GB is only running for about $100. I assume this "NTI Backup Now EZ" can do complete system restores?

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#8
June 30, 2015 at 18:51:11
If you can afford to buy a new laptop I would go for it.
I think this model is more than 5 years old.
The harddisk gave up, the fans are getting noisy and most likely the battery is dead by now unless you have changed it over time.

Donate I to a young computer geek... ;-)


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#9
June 30, 2015 at 20:16:54
Yes, it's supposed to, but I will have to read up on how to do that with a new hard drive...

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#10
June 30, 2015 at 20:21:56
The battery hasn't held a charge for quite a few years, but it hasn't been a problem. It probably is time for a new one, but this one has been very reliable! This is the 'hardest' problem I've encountered in 5 years. Thanks again for the help!

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#11
July 1, 2015 at 04:55:22
✔ Best Answer
Well, the hard drive's probably the third easiest part to replace, so there's that. Look at the bottom of your laptop for a symbol that'll either look like a cylinder, or 3 disks stacked one over the other. Remove that panel, remove the screws holding the HDD in, push the HDD away from the connector, then lift out, and remove the cradle from around the HDD. Congratulations, you just removed the HDD. Installing is the reverse of that. Then, it's just a question how good your backups are.

For the replacement drive, it needs to be 2.5", and it needs to be some variation of SATA / Serial ATA. I'd recommend solid state, because SSDs handle movement better than traditional disks; I'd recommend a 250GB drive, since that's what your old drive was.

Or just skip the hassle and get a new laptop. Lenovos used to be built like a tank, but I can't recommend them these days.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#12
July 1, 2015 at 16:08:49
I have to agree, changing the hard drive is not too hard but you should make an image of the drive if that is possible still before removing it, unless you have one already. Restoring from recovery disks followed by Windows Update, followed by restoring your back up is also possible. Replacing the fan is generally much more difficult on most lap tops because nearly everything needs to be disassembled before you can do this so it is not for everyone. In general, replacing is probably a better option, easier, and with the price of laptops now, you can usually upgrade to a much better one and still pay less than you did back when it was new (there are still expensive performance ones out there, but not everyone really needs one of those).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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