The new gtx 590

March 7, 2011 at 00:20:21
Specs: Windows XP/Seven, I3 2.9ghz 4GBram
The new Nvidia GTX 590 is coming out soon and I was wondering, seems the card has dual gpu chips, if you ran 4 cards in quad-sli, would this give you 8 GPU's or is there a driver limitation? Would make a pretty leathal CUDA machine! 4000 cores!

See More: The new gtx 590

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#1
March 7, 2011 at 04:14:01
First off You don't need 4 cards for a good gaming experience and only one is enough or if you want to go further you can get dual SLI.
Don't waste your money.

Tek Ideas Unlimited


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#2
March 7, 2011 at 04:34:51
It wasn't intended for use with gaming, more for applications that could harness the CUDA cores. I only wondered if it was possible. Seeing as the Evga classified 4-way motherboard can handle 4-way sli, I thought that maybe seems the single card has 2 chips already, if you got 4 cards, it would work in quad sli. Or, does one single card operate in sli mode as it is, to handle the extra GPU.
For the type of applications I was referring to anyway, you do not need an expensive dedicated CUDA card with all the fancies, such as the Telsa. So if the above could be done, you would have a very large bang-for-buck CUDA system.

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#3
March 7, 2011 at 05:06:22
I don't know why you would need that kind of graphics power, put you would have to invest several 1000's of dollars to build a system like that. Not only would you have the cost of multiple high end graphics cards at probably $500-700 each, but you would need a high end motherboard, loads of RAM, a top of the line CPU (to prevent bottenecking the cards), plus one helluva power supply to run it all. Do you have that kind of money to spend?

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#4
March 7, 2011 at 08:09:44
From all the photos I've seen, the 590 is just like all other nvidia dual-gpu cards in that it only has a single SLI connector. This means you can only physically plug no more than 2 590's together.
BUT
I found with my last SLI setup (2 8800GTXs) that the nvidia driver would still allow you to setup the cards in SLI without the SLI connector being connected at all. Furthermore it gave just about identical 3dmark scores to an SLI setup with the connector fitted. Before anyone suggests it, yes my SLI mode was around twice as fast as single GPU mode (so was working properly).
It seems the SLI connector does very little really and accounts for hardly any, if any extra performance at all.
It makes you wonder if the nvidia drivers still allow connectorless SLI and if so, then this (or maybe 2 groups of 2 connected cards) would be a viable route for running 4 590's
I drool just guessing what would be the actual performance of a rig with 4 590's (if you could even find a big enough PSU and motherboard with enough physical space and real PCIe-x16 connectors to support it).
Also can anyone else with an SLI setup confirm you find little/no performance difference when running SLI without the connector installed?
Maybe the SLI connector is really just some redundant nvidia marketing thing.


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#5
March 7, 2011 at 10:32:11
Ahh, thats interesting Niz. Would be interesting to see, like you said, if you can configure 4-way sli without the sli connector. As for power, I would have to run 2 power supplies. The system will need to be ultra reliable. And for motherboard, the EVGA Classified 4-way seems to be a fine contender.
I guess I will have to wait to see. No dout someone will get their hands on 4 590s and give it a go. Rumour is that it might be getting released 11th March so not to long to wait.
Id like to see the new Radeon 6990 running CAL++ in comparison to the GTX590 running CUDA

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