Solved SSD and Regular Maintenance

December 8, 2013 at 08:11:12
Specs: Windows 8.1, 4 GB Pentum 4
Recently I bought a Samsung 840Pro and as I'm new to this format I have some doubts.
Considering that memory is not renewable in SSD, Id like to know if it makes any sense to carry out all the usual maintenance procedures you regularly do with non SSD, like clean up and defragmentation.
Id appreciate your opinions.

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#1
December 8, 2013 at 08:46:02
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2047...

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
December 8, 2013 at 09:53:17
guapo - interesting article and thank you for link...

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#3
December 8, 2013 at 11:52:21
✔ Best Answer
That article really isn't surprising. The two biggest factors that slow a traditional disk is the rotational speed of the disks, and moving the heads into position. Defrag helps the latter by reducing the amount of movement the heads need to do.

SSDs neither rotate, nor have heads to move. Defrag might help if moving the file put it in the same page as the rest of the file, but the modern OSes will align file system clusters with SSD pages. I'm not saying it's impossible to happen; disk or volume cloning software will gladly not align the clusters to the pages, but at that point defrag is a lot like putting a small band-aid on a large gash. It technically helps, but you won't see much improvement.

That entire article is as silly as an article talking about the airspeed of cars.

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#4
December 8, 2013 at 15:38:08
Ok, so much for defragmenting, but how about cleaning unused or useless files, is it worth doing in SSD?

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#5
December 8, 2013 at 15:52:17
I understand that turning off defrag and indexing will extend the life of an SSD, though occasionally a disk clean up should not hurt, though avoid doing it too often (maybe 4 times a year should not make any significant difference in drive life).
Look on the SSD drive manufacture's site for optimizations for your new SSD to keep it up to max performance and right under warranty as long as possible.
Another good practice is to make an image of the SSD and store it on your regular hard drive in case you do ever have a problem. For an operating system and major programs only, the image probably needs to be updated two to four times a year with regular back ups of your normal data that is on your regular hard drive (at least weekly).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
December 8, 2013 at 16:19:48
In normal operation, I do file cleaning whenever I'm running low on free space, and never before.

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