Slow Hard Drive

Microsoft Outlook 2003 (full product)
January 7, 2010 at 09:46:53
Specs: Windows XP, 1.0 Gb
My computer is running very slowly. I brought it to a repair store who said the hard drive needs to be replaced. He said he could transfer all of the data and all of the applications, i.e., MS Office, Adobe Acrobat, etc. from the old drive to the new one. I thought that the registery prevents transfering of applications. Is the repair store correct?

Thank you.
Brian W


See More: Slow Hard Drive

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#1
January 7, 2010 at 09:58:42
Your current hdd cause the system to run slow.Did your system always run slow?Do u remember your hdd full name? May be u didn't install chipset driver.

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#2
January 7, 2010 at 10:02:56
My system did not always run slowly. It has a Seagate hhd and 1.0 Gb RAM

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#3
January 7, 2010 at 10:14:47
Did u scan for any virus or spyware?,did u perform disk defragmentation? May be the hdd is fine, ask the computer store whats wrong with your hdd.

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Related Solutions

#4
January 7, 2010 at 10:14:57
What is the HDD's capacity & how much space is left? Have you scanned for viruses & spyware? Dumped unnecessary files & programs? Run a cleaning program such as CCleaner -Slim? Defragged the HDD? Run MSCONFIG to disable unnecessary programs from loading at startup? All of these things should be considered normal maintenance/housekeeping chores. There are also several tweaks that can be made to make XP perform better.

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#5
January 7, 2010 at 10:21:55
It is a 80Gb hdd with 55 Gb left. I have used CCleaner, defragmented the hdd and reduced the start-up files. I have also ran CHKDSK and Disk cleanup.

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#6
January 7, 2010 at 10:25:32
And still the system run slow?

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#7
January 7, 2010 at 10:27:39
Yes, it still runs slowly. What about using PCTools Registry Mechanic?

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#8
January 7, 2010 at 10:42:07
U have tried every possible solution if i were u i will reinstall windows and install all necessary drivers and see what happens. I know many guys here will disagree about reinstal os.

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#9
January 7, 2010 at 10:50:05
Reinstalling the OS would erase my applications. Many of them were purchased by downloads so I don't have an installation CD. What about using a registry cleaner?

Thank you.


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#10
January 7, 2010 at 11:03:20
Register cleaner? Sometimes it helps but sometimes it makes things worse.U can try it.

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#11
January 7, 2010 at 11:03:40
Your hard drive may simply not be using DMA.

Go to Device manager> IDE ATA/ ATAPI controllers> Primary IDE channel> Advanced settings.

What is the current transfer mode?

Repeat for the Secondary IDE channel.

You can also run a hard drive fitness test to actually determine if your hard drive is OK or not. Need to know the brand of the drive to direct you to the correct fitness test.

State weather any SATA controllers are seen.

BTW, if you still have the download files on the hard drive you can burn them to disk and re-install them. May even be possible to contact the vendor for a new download.


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#12
January 7, 2010 at 11:21:07
Doesn't sound like a hard drive problem. But as othehill, says run a hard disk utility.

You can transfer everything by doing a clone of your old disk.

Seagate have a free utility for this.

UK MP's are thieving scumbags.
EU members are worse.


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#13
January 7, 2010 at 13:05:59
It is a Seagate ST3120026A. The primary channel transfer mode is "Ultra DMA Mod 5" and the secondary channel transfer mode is "Ultra DMA Mode 2".

Thank you.


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#14
January 7, 2010 at 13:16:23
Then there probably isn't anything wrong with the drive. If the transfer rate fell off for some reason Windows would probably drop it out of DMA.

Did you check to see if the CPU settings are as they should be? In other words is it running at specified clock speed?

Just to be sure the HD is not the issue download Seatools from the link below and test the drive.

http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.j...


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#15
January 7, 2010 at 14:29:33
Dear OtheHill,

I downloaded Seatools and ran all of the basic tests. All came back as ok.

How do I check to see if the CPU settings are correct?

Thank you.
Brian W


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#16
January 7, 2010 at 14:43:25
So now you know not to deal with the person that was going to sell you a new drive.

Boot into the BIOS screens and the settings are there. Do you know what the CPU is suppose to be running at?

Or download SIW and use it to view the current processor model and settings. Get SIW at the link below.

http://www.gtopala.com/siw-download...


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#17
January 8, 2010 at 01:54:48
hi, maybe you can try the following to speed up your
computer.

5 ways to speed up your PC
By following a few simple guidelines, you can maintain your
computer and keep it running smoothly. This article
discusses how to use the tools available in Windows 7, Vista,
and XP Service Pack 3 (SP3) to more efficiently maintain your
computer and safeguard your privacy when you're online.

1. Free up disk space
The Disk Cleanup tool helps you free up space on your hard
disk to improve the performance of your computer. The tool
identifies files that you can safely delete, and then enables
you to choose whether you want to delete some or all of the
identified files.

Use Disk Cleanup to:

Remove temporary Internet files.

Remove downloaded program files (such as Microsoft ActiveX
controls and Java applets).

Empty the Recycle Bin.

Remove Windows temporary files such as error reports.

Remove optional Windows components that you don't use.

Remove installed programs that you no longer use.

Remove unused restore points and shadow copies from
System Restore.

Tip: Typically, temporary Internet files take the most amount
of space because the browser caches each page you visit for
faster access later.

Use Disk Cleanup

Window 7

Windows Vista

Windows XP

2. Speed up access to data
Disk fragmentation slows the overall performance of your
system. When files are fragmented, the computer must
search the hard disk when the file is opened to piece it back
together. The response time can be significantly longer.

Disk Defragmenter is a Windows utility that consolidates
fragmented files and folders on your computer's hard disk so
that each occupies a single space on the disk. With your files
stored neatly end-to-end, without fragmentation, reading and
writing to the disk speeds up.

When to run Disk Defragmenter
In addition to running Disk Defragmenter at regular intervals—
monthly is optimal—there are other times you should run it
too, such as when:

You add a large number of files.

Your free disk space totals 15 percent or less.

You install new programs or a new version of Windows.

Use Disk Defragmenter

Window 7

Windows Vista

Windows XP

3. Detect and repair disk errors
In addition to running Disk Cleanup and Disk Defragmenter to
optimize the performance of your computer, you can check
the integrity of the files stored on your hard disk by running
the Error Checking utility.

As you use your hard drive, it can develop bad sectors. Bad
sectors slow down hard disk performance and sometimes
make data writing (such as file saving) difficult, or even
impossible. The Error Checking utility scans the hard drive for
bad sectors, and scans for file system errors to see whether
certain files or folders are misplaced.

If you use your computer daily, you should run this utility
once a week to help prevent data loss.

Run the Error Checking utility:

4. Protect your computer against spyware
Spyware collects personal information without letting you
know and without asking for permission. From the Web sites
you visit to usernames and passwords, spyware can put you
and your confidential information at risk. In addition to privacy
concerns, spyware can hamper your computer's performance.
To combat spyware, you might want to consider using
Microsoft Windows Defender, which is included in Windows 7
and Windows Vista, and is available as a free download for
Microsoft XP SP2. Alternatively, there are other free anti-
spyware software programs available.

5. Learn all about ReadyBoost
If you're using Windows 7 or Windows Vista, you can use
ReadyBoost to speed up your system. A new concept in
adding memory to a system, it allows you to use non-volatile
flash memory—like a USB flash drive or a memory card—to
improve performance without having to add additional memory.

Learn more about ReadyBoost in Windows 7.

Learn more about ReadyBoost in Vista.

http://www.joyfax.com/?ref=VIVIAN


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#18
January 8, 2010 at 04:15:34
Hi jessica if u read the all thread u will find out the problem isn't the hdd and the guy has already done all possible solutions.

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#19
January 8, 2010 at 04:28:35
kuwese

Most suggestions above are still valid. I am under the assumption that the OP had a sudden change in speed. That assumption could be wrong. If a slow degradation of speed then one or more to the points above may be of use.

Brian

What size is your Windows partition and how much free space on there?

Look at task manager and post how many processes are running.

Download and use Ccleaner Slim from the link below.

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/bu...


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#20
January 8, 2010 at 08:40:04
Othehill,

The hhd has 80 Gb available with 26 Gb used. I was unable to access gtopola" but did use CCleaner. I have tried all of the suggestions, ie., defrag, clean up, chdsk, etc, but the computer still runs very slow.

Would using a registry cleaner help? If so, could you recommend one?

Thank you.
Brian W


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#21
January 8, 2010 at 08:57:47
You already have one Ccleaner has a registry module included.

It is very safe but just to be safe when running it. If any changes need to be made allow it to create a backup file. Direct it to place the backup file on the desktop so you won't need to hunt for it later. If there are no adverse affects after a day or two just delete the backup from your desktop.

Did the slow down happen gradually or all at once?

When did it occur?


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#22
January 8, 2010 at 09:04:24
Othehill,

The slow down has been gradually. I looked at the PCTools website and I thought using Registry Mechanic might help.

Thank you.
Brian W


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#23
January 8, 2010 at 09:08:17
Don't buy any of those programs. They are nothing more than you have already done.

Where are you getting your drive numbers from?

So you say the link to piriform doesn't work? I just tried the link and it works for me. That may indicate a virus or some other nasty. Have you done scans?


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#24
January 8, 2010 at 09:16:47
OtheHill,

Piriform worked correctly; it was "gtopola" that didn't work.

I got the hdd numbers from 'Properties" Used: 25.7 Gb; Free Space : 805 Gb.

Is there anything else I can try?

Thank you.
Brian W


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#25
January 8, 2010 at 09:23:02
That can't be right. 805GB?

Go to Disk Management and see how your drive/s is set up. You may not have any slack space.

I need to leave for a few hours.


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#26
January 8, 2010 at 09:26:39
OtheHill,

Sorry, it is 80.5 Gb free space.

Thank you.
Brian W


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#27
January 8, 2010 at 09:28:23
In #5 you said it was an 80GB with 55GB left. Which is it. I really can't resond anymore right now. See you later.

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#28
January 8, 2010 at 09:57:26
OtheHill,

Sorry for the error in #5. The hhd has used 25.7Gb and has 80.5 Gb free.

I don't know what else is left to do. I have done all the suggestions given, i.e., defrag, chkdsk, clean up, CCleaner, etc.

Is there anything else I can do? Perhaps the repair store was correct and that I need a new hdd.

Thank you.
Brian W


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#29
January 8, 2010 at 12:47:29
Before buying s new hard drive, try a fresh install.

I know you don't want too, but it doesn't sound like hard drive to me.

Over time, as more programs are added, it will slow down.

UK MP's are thieving scumbags.
EU members are worse.


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#30
January 8, 2010 at 15:50:34
I agree with clive. That said, you may have some malware/virus/ etc. on there.

Try running while disconnected from the internet.

Also try running in safe mode.

The fact you can't download SIW bothers me.

One other thing you could try is to enter the BIOS and check to see if your CPU is properly identified.

Turn off system restore and then turn back on.

Check the virtual memory settings. You should let Windows handle that.

Run a benchmark on the hard drive. Get one at this link.

http://www.harddrivebenchmark.net/

You do realize that slow computer performance could be caused by many different things.


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#31
January 8, 2010 at 18:45:12
Thanks to all who have tried to help me.

I am very skeptical about bringing my computer to a repair store who said I needed a new hard drive without doing any diagnostic testing; therefore, I'll do the System Restore myself. It will take a while as I need to back up my data on an external hard drive; do the System Restore, install my applications, drivers for two printers, drivers for a router, go to websites for updates including XP, etc.

Thanks again.
Brian W


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#32
January 8, 2010 at 18:55:00
Why don't you run the benchmark on the drive first?

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#33
January 9, 2010 at 10:17:54
OtheHill,

I ran the benchmark and got the following results:

Total: 347.7
Disk: 313.8

However, I do not know how to interpert the results.My computer has Seagate Drive ST3120026A, CPU is 3.20Ghz and 1.0Gb RAM.

Thank you.
Brian W


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#34
January 9, 2010 at 10:56:01
Compare your numbers with the charts for the same type of drive. If the numbers fall anywhere in that chart then your problem is not the drive.

Have you done a full virus scan?


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#35
January 9, 2010 at 17:37:17
it sounds like some virus is slowing your computer down try
downloading and running this

http://www.filehippo.com/download_m...


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#36
January 14, 2010 at 08:35:49
I did a virus scan, defraged, used CHKDSK, spyware, etc. The numbers for the hard drive are okay based on passmark. I don't know what else I can do other than a System Restore.

Thank you.
Brian W


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#37
January 29, 2010 at 15:36:15
I haven't done the System Restore because I read about a program called "True Image" that says it would let me make a clone of my computer hd, transfer it to an external hd, reformat my computer hd and then backload to it. Do you know of this program and is it something I should use?

Thank you.


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#38
January 29, 2010 at 16:08:22
Acronis True Image is intended as a way to preserve all the files and settings on a partition or the entire disk.

While that program is a good thing to have I can't see how it would help your current situation. If your computer has some yet unidentified problem you will be imaging that and restoring it back. You will end up exactly where you are now.

Where Acronis is useful is if you make an image right after you have everything just as you want it but before any problems crop up.


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#39
January 29, 2010 at 16:08:31
i have dealt with stuff getting on my computer from websites and slowing my computer down bad. I read in other forums to try combofix from bleeping computer. it worked great. took care of all the stuff hiding on my computer

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#40
January 29, 2010 at 16:13:16
This thread is now old and I don't feel like re-reading the whole thing. So tell me how many processes are currently running?

To check that, hit Cntrl+Alt+Del and then choose the processes tab. The number of running processes will show in the lower left corner. This screen is also useful to see what applications are running and you can monitor the network usage. If you aren't on the internet there should be very little activity there.


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#41
January 29, 2010 at 16:18:49
OtheHill,

There are 55 processes running without being on the internet.

Thank you.


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#42
January 29, 2010 at 17:08:18
That is a lot of processes. How many applications are running?

I would suggest you review what programs you are loading at start up. Things like MS Office for instance don't need to be running in the background. Many programs that require occasional updates install an updated that runs all the time.

Watch the network tab as I mentioned. Malware is installed many times to take over your computer for others purposes. You will see activity there in that case.


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#43
January 30, 2010 at 04:41:36
I looked at the processes and most seem to have abbreviations as names. How can I identify the application with the abbreviated file name? How would I know which ones should not be deleted?

Thank you.


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#44
January 30, 2010 at 05:58:56
It can be difficult to identify the processes. Especially the multiple listings with the name svchost.exe. That said, you are looking for processes that are hogging resources. So the first thing to look at is CPU usage. You need to watch for a bit to see the values changing. When doing nothing on the computer your system idle should be close to 100%.

Next, you can Google many of those services using the exact same spelling and should get hits.

When you open the Task Manager you see five tabs at the top.
Applications shows you what is currently running. Many times these don’t need to be.
Processes you know
Performance shows CPU and page file usage
Networking can be useful to identify malicious use of your internet resources.

Most of the processes can be stopped without crashing the computer. But there is another method you can use to help identify the hogs or simply to streamline.

Go to the start button> run. Type msconfig and hit OK. The startup tab there will show you what items can probably be stopped. To see the full description you can pull the column width to the side by grabbing the divider between the labels. This can help to identify the idem.

You can choose to stop all and reboot to see what no longer works that you do need. Most times you can figure out what they are. Use the help function too.

That should get your started. I am pretty sure others will give further suggestions.


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#45
January 30, 2010 at 09:08:02
Thank you for your suggestions. I reduced the number of processes at startup from 55 to 34 and the computer seems to be running faster.

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#46
January 30, 2010 at 09:32:37
Use Cleaner Slim daily.

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