Selection - LCD display

January 12, 2010 at 17:30:21
Specs: Vista, AMD 955
Hi folks,


OS - mainly Linux/Unix


I need a 23"/24" LCD display for computer with following essential requirement:
height adjusting
resolution - 1920 x1080
AVG and DVI input


I found following models:-

Philips 23" 230C1HSB LCD(12000:1,2ms,USB,DVI,HDMI,Spk,Full HD)
Philips 23" 230E1HSB LCD (12000:1,DVI,HDMI,Spk,Full HD)

and

Philips 24" 244E1SB LCD(25000:1,2ms,USB,DVI,HDMI,Spk,Full HD)
Philips 24" 241E1SB LCD (25000:1,DVI) black


Their price are acceptable to me.


Please shed me some light on follows;
Full HD - what is it for?
25000:1,2ms and 12000:1 - would the former be better with faster refresh rate ?

Built-in speaker is NOT important to me.


Acturally I prefer 23" model because of the computer table size. But I found the price for 23" and 24" LCD displays are almost the same.


Please comment. Are there any other suggestions on makers and models. There are NOT many LCD displays with height adjustment on market. TIA


B.R.
satimis


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#1
January 12, 2010 at 19:40:27
"height adjusting"

What do you mean by that?

"AVG and DVI input"

Do you mean VGA and DVI input?

As far as I have seen, if it has both, you can only use one of them, not both of them, at any one time. You may be able to connect both, but you probably can only actually use one of them at a time (see the monitor's manual).

"Full HD - what is it for?"
It's1080i HD video rather that 720p.
For a video input other than from a regular computer monitor output or a composite output.
E.g. some standalone DVD players have full HD output via a HDMI connection; some more recent video adapters on computers have full HD output via a HDMI connection.
(I have no idea whether that looks better than a regular computer monitor display, but it certainly looks better than a a regular composite - or S-Video display. )

"25000:1,2ms and 12000:1 - would the former be better with faster refresh rate ?"

25000:1 and 12000:1 are contrast ratio (range) ratings - the ratio of the dimmest to the brightest the display can display - those have nothing to do with any refresh rate. They are a subjective rating made by the manufacturer and relate directly to how black a black is that can be displayed - if the black is blacker, the ratio is higher. The user doesn't see much difference except the black is blacker on the higher ratio ones.

1.2ms (milli seconds) is how long it takes, minimum, for a display frame to change from one frame to the next one - the smaller / faster it is the better fast moving video looks. CRT displays are much faster than LCD displays regarding that - so much so, they have no similar rating; Plasma displays are much better than any LCD displays regarding that. 120HZ LCD display technology is better than 60HZ LCD display technology regarding that; 240HZ LCD display technology is better than 120HZ LCD technology displays regarding that.

The legacy vertical and horizontal refresh rate are something else altogether, expressed in Hz (per second) - the higher that is, the better fast moving video looks.

The current top of the pile as far as how good motion looks are the 1080i plasma displays, and the recently introduced LCD LED displays, which have individulal LEDs for the pixels, but both are too expensive for most people.
~42" Plasma 720p displays are currently selling at a good discounted price - 620HZ display technology.


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#2
January 13, 2010 at 07:35:26
Hi Tubesandwires,


Thanks for your advice.

> "height adjusting"
> What do you mean by that?

I meant the display can be raised or lowered above the table for easy viewing rather than adjusting the seat height.

> "AVG and DVI input"
> Do you mean VGA and DVI input?
Yes, sorry for my mistake

> ~42" Plasma 720p displays are currently selling at a good
> discounted price - 620HZ display technology.
It won't be suitable for me. What I need is a desktop display/monitor for computer.

Others noted. Thanks

B.R.
satimis


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#3
January 13, 2010 at 13:04:24
Okay.

"~42" Plasma 720p displays are currently selling at a good
discounted price - 620HZ display technology."

I should have mentioned that's a TV that can also be used as a computer monitor.
TVs these days can also be used as an excellent computer monitor and are a good alternative, especially for those who would like a larger display, and they have multiple types of inputs, including VGA or DVI or both, and HDMI.


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Related Solutions

#4
January 13, 2010 at 17:30:46
Hi Tubesandwires,

If the price of the LCD-TV display is more or less the same as a LCD display with similar spec then I will consider the LCD-TV display.


What will be the difference in function between a LCD and LED displays. What will be the difference in function between a LCD and LED displays. I found Dell
G2410 24 inch Full HD LED Widescreen Flat Panel Monitor

Overview
http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/...

Tech Specs
http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/...


It is price is acceptable to me.

Resolution: 1920 x 1080 at 60 Hz
Contrast Ratio: 1000:1 upto 1,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio
Max Viewing Angle: 160deg/170deg (vertical/horizontal)

Unfortunately I can't find height adjustment.

What will be your comment? Thanks

B.R.
satimis


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#5
January 14, 2010 at 16:01:36
The primary difference between a LCD display and a LCD / LED display (a.k.a. a LED display) is the white light source (backlight(s)) in behind the LCD (liquid crystal display) grid of pixels. (I was wrong saying each pixel is an individual LED.) The primary advantage in theory is LEDs last a lot longer than the legacy CCFL (cold cathode florescent lamp) used in LCD displays - like all florescent bulbs, it (they; some have more than one) burns out eventually, and that's usually what eventually makes a legacy LCD display stop displaying (no picture at all, eventually).
In theory LEDs last a long, long time - in practice, I've never seen an LED that was burnt out, even on old computers.
The reason they have only come out recently is the white leds necessary were not bright enough until someone figured out how to make them brighter a few years ago.

The links you supplied don't work - I get "The product you have selected is not currently available for online purchase in the segment you have selected." for both.

FYI sometimes links to a web page won't work if you try to use them directly, when you paste them here. This site uses a program that shortens longer links to have them take up less space on the pages - what you see on this site is a shortened link with three dots at it's end that is supposed to be a link to the real link, but sometimes the program makes mistakes.

I found the info you pointed to anyway, by searching using : Dell G2410 24 inch Full HD LED Widescreen Flat Panel Monitor

Tech spec excerpts:

Max Resolution:
1920 x 1080 at 60 Hz
(I couldn't find specs for the Phillips models you quoted that tell me whether they are 1920 x 1080 at 60 Hz, but going by their price on the web, they are probably 1920 x 1080 at 60 Hz too ( 60HZ technology monitors are the cheapest, of the 60, 120, and 240 HZ technologies.)

Contrast Ratio:
1000:1 standard contrast ratio (typical)
Up to 1,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio (typical)
(As I said that's subjective according to a particular manufacturer's ratings, and that has not been standardized - it's probably fine.)

Response Time:
5 ms (typical) (That's slower than the 1.2ms you quoted for the one Phillips model. By the way, where did you find that quoted?)

So - if how good fast video looks (e.g. in games) is important to you, you will get a little more blurring of the image with the LED monitor because it's 5ms instead of 1.2ms, but in both cases your 1920 x 1080 being @ 60hz is also a limitation regarding that. The display should be good in either case, but they're not excellent regarding how good fast moving video will look.

"Unfortunately I can't find height adjustment."

Dell has a user manual available.

http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

It appears it's not height adjustable, but it can be wall mounted, and you could do what people do with most monitors - if it isn't high enough, either adjust you chair height, and/or stick something underneath it's base.
Tilt is adjustable.
"Max Viewing Angle: 160deg/170deg (vertical/horizontal)"
That's not bad - that indicates it doesn't have to be directly in front of you and square to you to look okay.

If how good fast video looks (e.g. in games) is very important to you, you need to get a monitor that has at least 120HZ technology, so you could have at least 1920 x 1080 at 120 Hz.
......

Of course, whatever graphics adapter you have has to support aresolution of 1920 x1080 or greater.

"AMD 955"

AMD Phenom II X4 955, 3.2ghz

I assume you do have a graphics adapter that will, since that cpu requires you have a fairly recent mboard.
.....

I found a mention that the Philips monitors you quoted have a 4 year warranty, rather than the 3 year warranty most decent LCD monitors and TVs have. However, it's a good idea to read the warranty. Often the CCFL itself (the backlight) is warrantied for only one year - the rest of the monitor has the longer rating.



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#6
January 14, 2010 at 16:15:30
HDTVs are usually 16:10 screen ratio and wide screen computer monitors are normally 16:9. This means the image may be distorted because the graphics card resolutions are not written for 16:10.

Samsung makes some LCD displays with height/tilt/swivel adjustment. You need to read the specs. IMO Samsung makes some of the best LCD displays.

http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/...


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