Sata hdd wont boot up correctly. Please help.

November 23, 2010 at 12:18:00
Specs: Windows Vista, AMD Sempron 3100+ / 1024mb DDR
Ok, so I just bought a new 1TB Internal WD caviar green Sata HDD(my first time having a sata). I also have a 120gb IDE HDD hooked up as my main drive that I've been using for years. The problem is when I hook up the Sata HDD is doesn't boot up, it stays stuck on a screen saying "Sil 3112A SATARaid Bios 4.2.49 Silicon Image, Inc.". It shows the name of the sata hdd but it doesn't proceed to the next screen but when I disconnect the Sata it boots up fine with no problem. I can't figure it out. If anyone could help that would be awesome. I don't know if my MoBo info will help but here it is... "System Manufacturer: RS480", System Model: AWRDACPI", "Bios: Phoenix-Award WorkstationBIOS v6.00PG", 'DirectX 10", "OS: Vista(32bit)", ATI Radeon 200xp Chipset ", "1997-2004". I just bought my harddrive 2 days and no one I know could help. I dont know if it could be updates or if I need to install something first. If anyone can help I would appreciate it very much. Thanks.

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#1
November 23, 2010 at 12:26:37
RS 480 is the model of your ECS mothrboard. Below is a link to the manual.

Are the SATA controllers enabled in the BIOS?

You may have two types of SATA controllers. The message you are seeing may refer to an onboard RAID controller. You may also have other SATA ports.

Consult your motherboard manual.

http://download.ecsusa.com/dlfileec...


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#2
November 23, 2010 at 12:50:34
You need to download and install the Vista RAID drivers for your motherboard. Link below.

http://www.ecsusa.com/ECSWebSite/Pr...


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#3
November 23, 2010 at 13:42:47
The SATA controllers must be enabled in the bios Setup - usually they are by default.

If your bios has the SATA controllers in a SATA mode, your operating system must have the SATA controller drivers installed in it. Windows shows SATA controllers as SCSI devices in Device Manager, if the drivers have been installed.

NOTE that if your SATA chipset supports RAID, if you are given more than one choice of which drivers to install when you provide the drivers, with nearly the same chipset model number otherwise, usually you must choose the RAID drivers even if you don't intend on using the RAID feature, because Windows won't accept the non-RAID drivers as valid. You DO NOT have to set up a RAID array - in most cases you must have at least two hard drives connected to the same RAID capable controller to set up a RAID array in any case - and the RAID drivers also support plain SATA use.
.....

If your bios has the SATA controllers in an IDE compatible mode of some sort, your operating system sees SATA drives as IDE compatible drives without needing SATA controller drivers, max burst data transfer speed is 133mb/sec, if your mboard supports IDE drives running at up to 133mb/sec.
......

Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.
........

According to the mboard manual at the link provided by OtheHill....
Your main chipset supports the original SATA specs (up to 150mb/sec burst data transfer speeds) , but NOT the SATA II specs (up to 300mb/sec burst data transfer speeds).
Your hard drive is probably a SATA II model (up to 300mb/sec burst data transfer speeds).
Some main chipsets that support only the original SATA specs WILL detect a SATA II drive, when it's in SATA II mode, as a SATA drive, and run it at SATA specs (up to 150mb/sec burst data transfer speeds).
However, some main chipsets that support only the original SATA specs WILL NOT detect a SATA II drive properly, when it's in SATA II mode, and in that case you must install a jumper on two pins on the drive to force the bios / main chipset to see it as a SATA (up to 150mb/sec burst data transfer speeds) drive, Some hard drives have the capability to do that and the pins (e.g. at least some Seagate models), some DO NOT have the capability (e.g. at least some Samsung models).
......

Some bioses default to try booting from an IDE hard drive first if one is connected; some bioses default to try booting from an SATA hard drive first if one is connected.
If the proper hard drive does not boot by default when you have both an IDE and SATA hard drive connected (or two IDE hard drives, or two SATA hard drives, etc.), the bios will NOT try to boot from another hard drive if the first one it detects is not bootable. In that case, you need to go into the bios Setup and find either.....
- a list of hard drives - it's often near the Boot Order or similar settings - and make the hard drive model you want to boot from the first one in the list, Save bios settings.
- or - less likely - the Boot Order or similar settings lists more than one hard drive - make the hard drive model or designation you want to boot from the first one in the list, Save bios settings.


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Related Solutions

#4
November 23, 2010 at 16:27:26
I downloaded the Vista RAID drivers and set the Sata Bios to Sata controller 0(if thats right or not. The default was Both.) The Sata type was defalut Raid Controller with IDE and Other as the other options. My mBoard is kind of old. I think I got it in '06 or '07. After i set the Bios it still does the same thing screen freeze. I don't even know the difference between SATA and SATA II. If i have to use the jumper, my harddrive didnt come with that little plastic/metal piece that you use for it. Im rather sure the HDD is Sata and not Sata II. I guess I don't know as much as I thought about computer. lol. Is there any video's on this subject that you of? I also heard other people saying stuff about formating. I dont want to format. Im gonna keep sifting through both of your posts and see if I can fix the problem. If I cant figure it out i'll post again or if you have different solutions.

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#5
November 23, 2010 at 17:59:15
If your SATA drive is 1TB then it is either SATA II or possibly even SATA III. All jumpers work the same way regardless of color, etc. Just get a jumper from somewhere and place it according to the manual.

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#6
November 23, 2010 at 18:05:28
OK, thanks OtheHill and Tubesandwires. I'm going to see if I can find any old hard drives. I don't know if I have any.

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#7
November 23, 2010 at 18:27:57
See the part about checking your SATA data and SATA power cable end connectors above.
If in doubt, use a different SATA data cable.

You should not be messing with bios settings unless you know what you're doing.
The only thing we asked you to do is to see if the SATA controllers are enabled - they probably are by default.
The bios defaults are probably fine for what you need, unless it won't boot from the drive you want to boot from with default settings (see above) .
I'm going to look at your manual - it probably has Bios Setup settings info in it.

NOTES
You can't boot from a new drive, or a used drive that has been wiped of it's data, because it has no data and no operating system on it.
The blank drive must be software partitioned (using the FAT, FAT32, or NTFS organization) and formatted in order for Windows to be able to see it.
The bios will not find that the SATA II drive is bootable until an operating system has been installed on it.
If the bios detects a non-bootable hard drive first, it WILL NOT try to boot from the next hard drive if there is one. See above for how to fix that when at least one hard drive is bootable, at least one hard drive is not bootable.
......

If you just want to use the SATA II drive for data, the computer needs to boot Windows from the IDE hard drive, then you can make one or more partitions and software partition and format them in Disk Management in Windows.
......

If you want to to install Windows on the SATA II drive, you need a Windows CD, you boot the computer from the CD, and the first thing you do is to make at least one partition on the hard drive - two or more is better - then the first partition is software partitioned and formatted - then you run Setup.
NOTE that if you want to have C assigned to the Windows partition, on the SATA II drive, you need to DISCONNECT the IDE hard drive's data cable, or unplug it's power connector, while running Setup !

If that's what you want to do, then you need more info - tell me if that's want you want to do !
........................................................................

"My mBoard is kind of old. I think I got it in '06 or '07."

The computer I am typing this on has a mboard made in Aug. 1999. Your mboard may not be new but it certainly isn't very old yet.

"Im rather sure the HDD is Sata and not Sata II."

Your drive is SATA II.

Probably ALL 1TB conventional hard drives are SATA II.
Probably ALL new SATA conventional hard drives are SATA II.

It's very easy to look that up.

"1TB Internal WD caviar green Sata"
Search the web sing: WD caviar green Sata 1TB
(All Caviar models are 3.5" desktop drives)

WD Caviar Green
Desktop Hard Drives
1 TB, 32 MB Cache, SATA 3 Gb/s
Model: WD10EADS
http://www.wdc.com/en/products/prod...

Yours may not be exactly the same model, but the installation and jumper info is the same as this....

Go here:
http://wdc.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/wdc...

Click on:
3. How to physically install, set jumper settings, and setup a SATA, EIDE, or SSD hard drive in Windows.....

Jumper settings for SATA 3.0 gb/sec 3.5" drives

Opt1 Enabled

Either your hard drive has the pins, or it doesn't.
The jumper info, or no jumper info, is probably also on the label on the top of the SATA II drive.

Sometimes the jumper is there but in a storage position. If it's not there you can probably get a jumper that fits from a local place that builds custom computer systems, or a smaller place that sells lots of computer parts.

I'm not saying you MUST use the jumper with your main chipset - I don't know - but if the drive is not detected after you have tried everything else, then that's probably what you need to use.
.......

"I don't even know the difference between SATA and SATA II."

I've already told you a bit about that.

SATA vs SATA II
http://www.cdrinfo.com/Sections/Rev...

SATA II SATA
Buffer To Host (Serial ATA) 300 MB/s (Max) 150 MB/s (Max)

The terminology is confusing.
E.g. for a SATA II drive
The max. burst data transfer speed 3.0gb/second rating is in gigaBITS per second.
The hard drive uses 10 BITS per BYTE.
Divide 3.0 gBITS per second by 10 - you get the max burst data transfer rate in BYTES.
The 300mb/sec rating is megaBYTES per second
Last post here:
http://forums.storagereview.com/ind...
"......serial protocols like SATA use 10b8b encoding so every byte transfered on the line consists of 10 bits, not 8. After decoding the channel can provide a hypothetical 300MB/s or 150MB/s transfer rate depending on the SATA generation used. The raw speed though is 3.0 Gb/s or 1.5Gb/s."



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#8
November 23, 2010 at 18:29:56
I hope im not bothering anyone by asking so many questions, but I found some jumper shunts and I took a snap shot of the jumper settings. What would be the one you think might work, and if I place it on the wrongs ones could it damage my hard drive? Here is the snap shot... http://i51.tinypic.com/2nv6mc3.png

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#9
November 23, 2010 at 18:41:50
Yea, I didn't want to boot from this hard drive, i think i messed up by saying i didnt boot up, it just wouldn't start up correctly after i connected it. I get mixed up sometimes. I just wanted to use it as a second drive. A 120gb just isn't a big enough drive. So I might have to partition the drive then? Yea I just got it the other day and just hooked it up, that could be the problem.

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#10
November 23, 2010 at 18:59:04
Regarding your response 8 and 9, see my response 7. I have added more to response 7.

"So I might have to partition the drive then"

When it has no data on it, you MUST partition, software partition (most people use NTFS) , and format the drive.

Check the SATA data and power cable end connectors.

If there's nothing wrong with it / them...

If it stills stalls while booting, see the last part of response 3 - make sure your IDE hard drive is the one you're trying to boot from, Save bios settings.

If that doesn't help, then the next logical thing to try is installing the jumper on the SATA II drive.


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#11
November 23, 2010 at 20:08:44
I've tried to partition my drive but it wouldn't even get past the Raid Utility screen.

Quick question. Would a Bi-Directional SATA to IDE Adapter work? From what the adapter says, it says it converts it into a IDE or something like that. http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?in...

Thanks for the help.


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#12
November 24, 2010 at 07:26:42
You DO NOT NEED to press a key and go into the RAID utility screen !

"Would a Bi-Directional SATA to IDE Adapter work? From what the adapter says, it says it converts it into a IDE or something like that."

If I were you I would try to find an appropriate jumper locally. Phone them up.

Apparently, they don't work in every situation on every computer, and if they do , your max burst data transfer speed would be 133 mbytes/sec, if your mboard supports that for IDE drives, rather than 150 mb/sec, although that isn't much of a difference.
On web sites such as www.newegg.com or www.tigerdirect.com you can find user reviews in the ad that you can read to get clues about how good a particular adapter is. Or on www.newegg.ca or www.tigerdirect.ca if you're in Canada.
You can probably buy such an adapter locally.


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#13
December 1, 2010 at 00:38:25
Quick question. When you spoke about the Sata contollers and if they where enabled, how many are there? Because I was looking through Device Manager and I see 3 controllers. Ati 4379 Serial ATA(enabled), ATI 437A(Disabled) Microsoft iSCSI Initiator(enabled). Does 437A Serial ATA have to be enabled?

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#14
December 1, 2010 at 08:13:27
As OtheHill said in response 1

"You may have two types of SATA controllers."
"Consult your motherboard manual."

The download link where you get the manual is in response 1.

If your mboard has two SATA controllers, then it has some SATA data headers for one SATA controller, some for the other one.

ATI 4379 Serial ATA -a Serial ATA (SATA) controller - it has a Silicon Image chipset - it appears it does not support RAID arrays.

ATI 437A - a serial SATA Raid controller - also has a Silicon Image chipset, it supports RAID arrays.

If you don't want to use a RAID array (usually you must have at least two hard drives connected to the same RAID capable controller in order to be able to have a RAID array in any case)
- you don't need to connect a SATA drive to a data header for that controller, and that controller does need to be enabled in the bios Setup
- if you DO connect a SATA drive to a data header for that controller, that controller must be enabled in the bios Setup, and the RAID drivers for it you load in Windows also support plain SATA use.

See your mboard manual !

If your SATA drive is connected to a header for the ATI 4379 Serial ATA you don't need to have the ATI 437A controller enabled in the bios.


Your problem when the SATA II drive is connected to a mboard SATA header that has an enabled controller is probably entirely due to you needing to have your SATA II drive (max300 mbytes/sec) recognized as a SATA drive (max 150 mbytes/sec) by the main chipset / bios.

Have you found an appropriate jumper yet ?

As I recall, I DID have to install such a jumper on a SATA II drive on a mboard with an ATI RS480 main chipset.
....

Info - Microsoft iSCSI Initiator Service
http://wiki.blackviper.com/wiki/Mic...



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#15
December 1, 2010 at 08:24:20
One other setting in the BIOS that may help, if it is available, is a setting to allow more time for the BIOS to configure the drives. Look for it. If available set to the max. which is usually 5 seconds. This will slow the boot time down by 5 seconds but may allow the BIOS to configure the drive, even without the jumper. Worth a try.

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#16
December 1, 2010 at 21:07:09
I found a jumper shunt but it doesn't really do anything. On pins 1-2, when i start up it doesn't read the sata during the Raid stuff screen. It starts up now I think because of the Southbridge stuff but it didn't start up before that it just froze during the Raid screen just before it starts up windows. It also randomly freezes up after its start with jumpers pins 1-2 / 5-6 / 7-8 but it only freezes for like 20 -30 seconds or so but it does it often. On pins 3-4, it reads it at the Raid screen during start up before it starts windows but like normal it doesnt read it after windows is running. Also when no jumper is on it also randomly freezes like pins 1-2 / 5-6 / 7-8.

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#17
December 1, 2010 at 21:32:15
WHY did you randomly try jumpering the pins !!

What a bonehead thing to do !!

You may have fried something !!

I've already shown you where you jumper the drive's pins !!

See the part starting here in response 7 !! :

"Yours may not be exactly the same model, but the installation and jumper info is the same as this.... "

Try connecting the drive to a computer that DOES support recognizing SATA II (300mbytes/sec) drives.
If it doesn't work with no jumper installed, then you have probably fried the drive's board !!


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#18
December 1, 2010 at 22:26:05
When I first connected the drive, it didnt have the jumper shunt and it didnt read it when windows was running. I have it on pins 3-4 right now on the drive and it still reads the drive at the Raid screen on start up but not when windows is running. Im not sure which pins it should be on anyways if any. I might have to look up videos on youtube or take my computer to bestbuy.

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#19
December 2, 2010 at 04:47:44
If the SATA drive is being configured in the BIOS screens that is good. Look for the SATA drive in Windows Disk Management. If it shows there you need to partition and format it. If it is NOT showing there then you need to install SATA drivers into Windows. You may be able to just run the files downloaded from the motherboard site. Or you may need to manually install the SATA controller using the install new hardware wizard.

Below from the information at the ECS site;
"The Southbridge integrates a Serial ATA host controller that
is SATA v1.0 compliant, supporting four SATA ports with maximum transfer rate up to 150
MB/s each".

So it seems you only have one type of SATA controller. You may have one or more controller. SATA controllers normally control 2 SATA ports. If you have only 2 ports then you have 1 SATA controller to deal with. Download the RAID drivers for your OS from the link below.

http://www.ecsusa.com/ECSWebSite/Pr...


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#20
December 2, 2010 at 21:33:35
Thanks. I think I've downloaded the Southbridge Raid Drivers. In my Bios its says Southbridge so I'm sure I've downloaded it and installed it already. As for my motherboard, I have four data slots for sata hdd's, also is anything different between a "mATA" or and "ATA" motherboard? Because mine isn't a micro. If I where to download the Southbridge Raid Driver again and install it would it mess up my comp if it was already installed? Cause I think that's the Driver I installed.

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#21
December 2, 2010 at 23:09:21
When my computer starts up, the first screen it says ATI rradeon xp chipset. Its a Logo of the chipset. After that it goes to the next screen that shows stuff like Raid utility setup. Press F4 or ctrl+del to enter raid. Im not sure if thats the correct thing it says to enter raid but its something like that I forget. I've never tried entering Raid but on that screen it shows the same few lines twice. During the second set of lines is where it reads the sata drive but it says the name then it says 0mbs next to it. Now, thats the only spot where I've seen it read the drive. I know a few things about bios, not much I do have to use fail-safe bootup some times so I am a little familiar with it. But most of the time I just look through. In the bios would the sata drive be under the southbridge part or under the spot where it shows what order stuff will boot up, cd-rom, hdd, etc. or in another spot. I really dont want to buy another mobo but its sorta looking that way. I just don't want to buy another mobo and have the same problem. I just want a extra drive for storage why does this have to be so difficult. lol. and I dont have another computer so I can't try the sata drive on another pc. Hmm I just clicked the download link you post posted above for the raid driver and I don't think I've installed that one. But in the folder it says RS460, mine is RS480.

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#22
December 3, 2010 at 03:42:54
First answer is mATX & ATX are form factors (sizes). That has nothing to do with the components on the board except for the fact that mATX usually has fewer options for expansion but more integrated features.

The boot screens you are seeing are used to set up a RAID array. I am not sure if you have selected something in the BIOS that is causing that screen but you don't want RAID and need more than one hard drive to use RAID.

OK, I reviewed your manual. You need to set the SATA drive to run in IDE mode.

Go to the screen for South on chip PCI devices. Set the following:
Auto
Enabled
Disabled
Enabled
IDE mode
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled

That should stop the RAID screens from showing

Elsewhere in earlier screens find listings for LOGOS. Disable all logos. This will allow you to see the hardware being configured.

Try those now and report back. Hopefully that will get you over the hump.

Of course I believe the boot order was addressed before. CD first, hard drive second. You also need to make a selection for WHICH hard drive first. There is a screen with that choice on it. Keep your present drive as first unless your intent is to install Vista to the new drive. Post back with your intent about that.


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