S-ATA hdd can't boot with P-ATA one

January 16, 2010 at 01:37:22
Specs: Windows XP
PC with 2 hdd 80G P-ATA and 250G S-ATA ; both
are installed winxp sp3. The P-ATA hdd can boot with
S-ATA hdd . The S-ATA can't boot unless P-ATA's cable is unpluged. Any help ?

Mainboard Asus 865/ICH5


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#1
January 16, 2010 at 10:44:19
When you say boot, do you mean it can't be recognized? Do you have them set to cs on the jumpers? Do they both show up in the bios?

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#2
January 16, 2010 at 10:49:46
Were both instances of Windows installed while the hard drives were installed in this computer?

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#3
January 16, 2010 at 12:08:20
Of course, the hard drive you boot from must have an operating system installed on it in order for you to be actually able to boot from it.

"Were both instances of Windows installed while the hard drives were installed in this computer?"

I'm assuming each hard drive boots fine when connected by itself, and you don't have a dual boot situation.
....

Bioses have boot order defaults they adhere to. Those defaults can vary. Sometimes the defaults aren't suitable for your situation.

In your case for your bios, if there is a PATA hard drive, or a PATA and SATA hard drive, connected, the bios defaults to try to boot from a PATA hard drive first.
When you disconnect the PATA' drive, if a SATA drive is connected, then the bios finds no PATA hard drive and then tries to boot a SATA drive first.
Some bioses do the opposite by default - if a SATA and PATA hard drive are connected, it tries to boot a SATA drive first.


If the bios isn't booting the drive you want to boot, it's easy to change that.

When both drives data cables are connected, go into the bios Setup and find the Boot Order settings or similar.
Either
- if you have more than one hard drive connected, the hard drives are selectable in the boot order settings - e.g. HDD0, HDD1, etc., or the model numbers are there
- or - more commonly - the boot order has only one "hard drive" or similar listed, and, if you have more than one hard drive connected, there is a list of hard drives there near the boot order settings, usually listed by their model number.

In either case, make the hard drive that is the drive you want to boot from, in this case the SATA model, the first drive listed.
Save bios settings. Reboot.
.....

If you have more than one PATA or more than one SATA hard drive connected, the bios defaults to try booting what it sees as the first drive on the drive controller. If that isn't the drive you want to boot from, you would need to change first drive booted from settings in the bios for that too.
.....

Note that if you disconnect a data cable to a drive, then boot the computer before reconnecting it, or change the number of drives you have connected or where drives are connected, the bios may set itself back to defaults regarding which drive is booted from.
.....

Some older SATA controllers on mboards have some SATA connectors that a drive connected to it can be booted from (the drive is seen as master) , and some SATA connectors that a drive connected to it can NOT be booted from (the drive is seen as slave). Sometimes the two types of SATA connectors are different colors, sometimes they aren't - see the mboard's manual or the User's or Owner's manual for a brand name system.


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#4
January 17, 2010 at 06:56:27
I did choose Boot Priority for S-ATA drive, after that BSOD appeared and PC restarted;

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#5
January 17, 2010 at 12:12:38
You didn't mention any BSOD previously.
What did or does it say on it?

You have not said whether you still have a problem !

"Were both instances of Windows installed while the hard drives were installed in this computer?"

Answer that !

If Windows was installed on one or both drives when the hard drive was connected to a different mboard, if the mboard hardware (main chipset etc.) is more than a little different, Windows may NOT LOAD on this computer on the drive that had Windows installed when it was on a different mboard - you typically see the first bit of Windows graphics, then just a black screen with a blinking cursor - nothing further happens.
That situation can be recovered from, by running a "Repair" installation of Windows on that drive, without you losing the data already on the Windows partition.
.....

If Windows was installed on both of the drives when it or they were connected to this mboard....

If you installed Windows on (ran Setup on) one hard drive when another hard drive that already had Windows on it was NOT connected, then my instructions will work fine - both hard drives have an "active" partition to boot from.

If you installed Windows on (ran Setup on) one hard drive when another hard drive that already had Windows on it was connected, then Windows automatically makes a dual boot situation after Setup has finished. You are prompted to choose which operating system (and hard drive in this case) you want to boot from every time you boot. Whatever one you choose becomes the "active" partition that is booted from.
If you remove the connection of that second drive (that you ran Setup on second) , the other drive won't boot, because it's not "active" - it needs the info in the MBR on the drive you removed.
That can probably be recovered from too.
If the drive has only what Setup installed on it, or not much more than that, the easiest way is to run Setup on that drive again, when it is connected BY ITSELF.
You will also have to edit boot.ini on the drive that had the dual boot situation, so it no longer has a dual boot situation.



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#6
January 17, 2010 at 12:30:38
If both hard drives boot to an OS when connected alone then you MAY have an option to select which drive to boot from during the POST screens.

Watch for a screen that may say something like "hit Esc to select a boot device". If you have such an option what will happen is whatever boot device you select will be the first boot device the next boot cycle. So if most times you wish to boot to a certain drive you wouldn't need to make a selection.

Using the Windows boot manager is not the best method IMO when you have OSes installed on two different drives. By using the method I just described the OSes are totally independent and will work even if one or the other is removed. Unlike the Windows boot manager.


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