SATA and IDE

June 19, 2009 at 07:26:42
Specs: Windows XP
I just bought a new barebones system and I need to have my old IDE hard drive because that is where my windows xp is located. I also got a new SATA hd and I wanted to try to load my information from my IDE drive to my new SATA drive and then I could remove my IDE drive. I currently have my system up and running with my IDE drive, in have installed my SATA drive and my computer will not recognize it as existing at this point. Can anyone help me?

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#1
June 19, 2009 at 08:01:15
Is the SATA drive partitioned & formated?

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#2
June 19, 2009 at 08:15:32
I can only guess that its not because I cannot get the computer to recognize it for me to see. I cannot format and partition the drive without being able to access it.

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#3
June 19, 2009 at 08:39:30
Is it recognized in the BIOS?

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Related Solutions

#4
June 19, 2009 at 09:06:50
I can see it in the bios but I cannot access it

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#5
June 19, 2009 at 09:28:15
Are you booting into WinXP from the IDE drive?

Is the SATA drive identified by BOTH model and full capacity in the POST screens at start up.

If so, then go to Disk management and see if the drive shows there. You can partition and format from Disk Management.

Why do you feel you need to have WinXP on the new SATA drive? What are the model numbers for both drives?


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#6
June 19, 2009 at 09:50:12
I am using the IDE drive because it has Win XP and all of my other information. I do not own any other operating system and that is why I want to transfer the info to my SATA drive. It is a seagate ST3250410AS and my IDE drive is a Western Digital WD32000AAKB-00UA0. Incidently I can see the Seagate drive in device manager and it says it is working correctly but I still cannot access it from my computer. I havent checked to see what is displayed in the boot record yet. I do not know where disk management is located.

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#7
June 19, 2009 at 10:28:05
Control Panel / Administrative Tools / Computer Management / Disk manager.

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#8
June 19, 2009 at 11:29:57
Thanks, I got it partitioned and I am formatting it now. Is there any way I can load WinXP on the SATA hard drive from my IDE hard drive? I do not have disks, Windows cam with my previous computer. Should I create a recovery CD from my IDE hd and then remove my IDE hd and boot from the recovery disk?

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#9
June 19, 2009 at 11:37:16
You should have gotten software with the new sata drive that will allow you to clone the new drive or copy the old to the new.

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#10
June 19, 2009 at 11:50:22
It didnt come with any software at all.

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#11
June 19, 2009 at 12:26:10
OK, go to seagate's site and download it from there.

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#12
June 19, 2009 at 13:43:33
What size is the Seagate drive? Seagate has ben have excessive failures with their larger drives lately. You may be better off staying with the IDE.

If you have not Windows CDs then you had better image the IDE drive as soon as you can. Acronis true image is a good imaging program. You can get it at the link below.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

See what operating systems you may need it to support and decide by that requirement.


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#13
June 20, 2009 at 07:42:45
I went to seagate and got their disk imaging software and I have been trying to clone my IDE hd to my SATA drive but it keeps coming up with the error: index corrupted. Any clues as to why? BTW my seagate is a 250gig. not a huge drive. I will try the Acronis True Image Home


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#14
June 20, 2009 at 08:41:45
the acronis was identical to what I got from seagate and it still says that the index is corrupted.

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#15
June 20, 2009 at 08:47:48
There may be no advantage to using the SATA drive. First point is this. SATA II drives have a slight advantage in real world application. However, that is only true is running in the native SATA II mode.

In order to do that you would need to install the SATA controller drivers at the time you install WinXP. So I am talking about a fresh installation.

In actuality that would be your best solution anyway. If you are like most users you have everything on one partition. That is not the best method to use IMO and in the opinion of many helpers here at CN.

I recommend partitioning that 250GB into at LEAST 3 partitions, possibly more. The reasons for that are many. First of all installing your operating system a a couple of key programs on the C partition keeps it small. That makes backups faster and easier and the OS will also run faster.

Installing the remainder of your programs on the D partition will allow backups of that partition at different intervals. The program partition will not change as often as the OS partition. The other reason is this. If you image both of those partitions separately and you need to restore the OS partition for some reason you won't need to reinstall all your programs and they will function correctly.

Finally, the E partition should be used to store your movies, music, photos, work docs, etc.

Again, these file will need backup at different intervals than the other partitions. The above make maintenance easier and go a long way to protect your personal files.

If you prefer you can still keep many personal files in the My Documents folder. Keeping files like movies that take a huge amount of space will eventually bloat your C partition.

Coincidentally, I am using a 250GB WDigital SATA as my primary hard drive. I have 3 partitions. C is 31.2 with 13.1 free. D is 58.6 with 51.8 free. E is the remainder.

My C partition stall has plenty of free space even though I have lots of junk in the My Documents folder.

The D partition is much larger than needed. I have a ton of programs and you can see they still only use about 7GB.

Using Ghost 2003 for imaging my C partition fits on 4 single layer DVDR disks. Acronis true image should be about the same. Typical compression for normal stuff is about 1 1/2 to 1.

Look at the link below for more information on partitioning.

BTW are you sure you can use a 250GB hard drive? WinXP will recognize the full capacity even if your BIOS doesn't Watch the POST screens at start up to verify the FULL capacity of the 250GB is recognized.

http://partition.radified.com/


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#16
June 20, 2009 at 09:41:05
I have a one terabyte external hard drive that i keep all of my media stuff on so that it doesnt bloat my internal hard drive. The partitioning that you mention makes sense but first I need to clone my IDE drive so that my SATA drive is bootable. I wish I had the WinXP disks and then I would just start fresh!

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#17
June 20, 2009 at 10:21:43
Do you have an OEM computer like a Dell, gateway, etc.? If so, you MAY be able to create restore disks, if they were never made before. Also, if the computer is not too old you may be able to buy a restore set from the manufacturer for like $25.

Why don't you have disks?


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#18
June 20, 2009 at 11:59:16
my old system is a dell but a restore disk uses files from the hard drive. It never came with any disks. There is a separate partition on the hard drive that has all the information to install windows from a recovery disk but you must have the original hard drive.

I got it up and going now though. Thanks everyone very much for all of your help


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