Running P4 at 25 C idle, is that normal?

June 19, 2010 at 11:59:06
Specs: Windows XP
I have a Intel Pentium 4 3.2 Ghz Prescott I am
about to be overclocking that has been running
around 42-45 C on average load and about 23 -
34 c idle.* I havn't tried playing any games yet, I usually play Oblivion and do alot of modding using Blender.* I have socket 478 biostar p4m900-
m4 mobo with a Asus heatsink with Artic
Silver ceramic thermal grease. Is this about
normal operating temp for this core or is this
running hot. I'd like to know before I start
overclocking so I dont fry the chip or overheat
my system...

Quick Specs
S478 P4 3.2 Ghz 800 Mhz FSB
2 Gigs Mem
2 x 120 WD 5400 or 7500 rpm IDE HDD
PCIE x16 GeForce 8600 GT OC *which i think also runs hot idle temp is at 63 C and underload it has gotten to 88 c so far using passmark benchmarking*
Win XP Home SP3
550 W PSU

two Case fans 120 rear exhaust, 80 front
intake

I think my HSF is blowing into the HS but I am
not for sure, and I have two fans in my PSU
bottem intake side exhaust which sits right
above my HSF


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#1
June 19, 2010 at 12:36:34
Not sure about the CPU temps, plenty of geeks in here can respond better than me regarding that; but exhaust fans, do what? Exhaust or blow out. They should ALWAYS blow out & away from the source.

I had to even reverse a case fan once because another ahem, "tech", installed it backwards and air was blowing INTO the case.

Just another stupid saying...


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#2
June 19, 2010 at 12:38:36
45 C under load is nothing to worry about, quite good in fact.

You only need start worrying when the temps creep into the high 50s and above 60C

88C for the graphics card is getting a bit warm.

I would try disconnecting the bottom front fan. I know it may sound silly but you might be surprised at the difference it could make. To much air being sucked in and nowhere to go can cause hot spots .

The HSF should be blowing onto the heat sink, Anything else and it is not doing its job.

Stuart


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#3
June 19, 2010 at 12:40:54
Exhaust = blowing out. I am actually a a big PC guru, my rig is a
custom built. But I live in Texas and we have been getting temps
of 102 my ac's just aint cuttin it. I am big on keeping my system
cool, and am about to over clock my cpu I just have never really
looked into the normal temp of a intel core before...

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Related Solutions

#4
June 19, 2010 at 12:45:49
45 C under load is nothing to worry about, quite good in fact.
You only need start worrying when the temps creep into the
high 50s and above 60C
88C for the graphics card is getting a bit warm.
I would try disconnecting the bottom front fan. I know it may
sound silly but you might be surprised at the difference it
could make. To much air being sucked in and nowhere to go
can cause hot spots .
The HSF should be blowing onto the heat sink, Anything else
and it is not doing its job.
Stuart


My front fan is adjustable it's one of those led 3 speed fans I
do have it on high. thanks for the info and I will also check on
my HSF see which direction it's actually blowing as for my
Vid Card maybe a extra fan would do better...


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#5
June 19, 2010 at 17:38:06
For a self-proclaimed "guru", you sure don't seem to be very knowledgable about temps & cooling.

Your CPU temps are excellent, especially for a Prescott. If you're using software for your temp readings, make sure they agree with the BIOS temps. And you don't have to worry about frying your CPU...it's impossible to overheat a P4 to death. You can kill it by overvolting, but not overheating.

As for the case cooling, all you really need is the PSU & a rear exhasut fan. Front intake fans are unnecessary & side intake fans disrupt the desired "front to rear" airflow. A fresh air duct for the HSF generally works well...just don't add a fan to it.

PC airflow and heat – a cooling guide

As for overclocking, I wouldn't expect a heck of a lot, but you *may* get lucky. Make sure to disable speedstep, C1E, all Spread Spectrum options & lock the PCIe at 100MHz. And keep the CPU:DRAM frequency ratio at 3:4. For example, with the CPU is at it's default 200MHz freq (800MHz FSB), the RAM should be at 266MHz (533MHz DDR). If you increase the CPU freq to 225MHz, the RAM should run at 300MHz, and so on.


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#6
June 19, 2010 at 21:54:56
Jam Thanks for the fresh info and yes I am a guru, just learning
something new thats all. never really paid attention to my temperatures before. and as for stuart's advice it has helped, I
have SIW running mos of the day and on idle my temps have
droped down to 19 c - average load 22 - 27 c and using a
benchtest only got to 39 c which is great I think.. thanks all for
the help and info lol now if I can just get my Graphics card to
cool down... lmao

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#7
June 19, 2010 at 22:52:09
Those are the lowest temps I've ever heard of for a Prescott core; makes me wonder about the accuracy of the temp readings.

When the first Prescott 2.8's came out, they idled at ~50°C on Abit motherboards like the IC7 and IS7 but the same exact processor showed 38°C idle on an Asus P4P800 board.

BIOS revisions were almost immediately released by both manufacturers to correct their temp readings; ABIT temps went down and ASUS temps went up. As lazyman said, all motherboards are not created equal...maybe he meant all BIOS writers aren't created equal. :-)

By the way, arrows are embossed on most fans showing fan rotation direction and airflow direction.

I think lazyman clocked his 2.8 to 245Mhz without raising vCore on the ABIT motherboards and with a slight vCore increase on the ASUS. I do remember him hitting 3.4Ghz with little trouble.

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#8
June 20, 2010 at 02:17:14
I'm using SIW's Sensor as I run prime95, I leave my rig running
basicly 24/7 unless I am cleaning the case out and such. been
having SIW run for almost 2 days since the last reboot and my
temps are Min - 19 c / max *so far* 42 c and as I type while
running a torture test with prime95 temp is steady at 41 c also
when I have ran other sensor programs ex. HWMonitor I had only
a degree or two differance...

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#9
June 20, 2010 at 03:29:07
I imagine BIOS temps, SIW and HWMonitor all agree within a ° or 2. Even if temp reporting was off by 20° (sure doubt that!), you'd still be in great shape. Don't be concerned if P4's vary 25-30° from idle to full load...it's just the nature of the beasts.

When Prescott cores hit the market 6 years ago, there was some pretty widespread panic among enthusiasts and motherboard manufacturers. 50-60° idle temps were commonplace and full load temps were outta sight at 75° and up.

The Prescott core processors I see nowdays seem to idle about 45-55° with stock heatsinks. Most of these machines are manufactured stuff like hp, Gateway, eMachines, etc. with fans running under 1,500 RPM. I've seen nothing in ~3 years with good aftermarket air cooling and haven't seen a water cooled P4 in 4 or 5 years.

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#10
June 20, 2010 at 08:50:41
Well that does make me feel alot better, my heat sink isn't stock
or atleast I don't think it is. It says asus on the fan, and the
Heatsink it's self has a copper core.

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#11
June 20, 2010 at 20:03:17
You realize that "guru" means "expert", right? You also realize that 19C is approx 66F, right? For your CPU to be at 19C, the room you have the PC in would have to be fairly cold.

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#12
June 20, 2010 at 21:53:35
OK if it will "straighten" things I am more of an enthusiast then a
guru... i cam here looking for answers about something I didnt
know not a battle of being politically correct. thanks now have a
nice day.

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#13
June 21, 2010 at 03:14:02
Actually Guru comes from the Sanskrit language and is used to describe someone who knowledge, wisdom and understanding of a subject is so great that other come to hear his wise words. The word is often used to describe a devout and learned member of the Hindu religion.

In other words a teacher, not simply a follower or an enthusiast.

Stuart


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